5 results in English
Selected Poems with Postscript, 1907–1914
This volume is a collection of poems written in 1907–14 by the Russian futurist Velimir Khlebnikov (born Viktor Khlebnikov, 1885–1922). It includes Khlebnikov’s famous poem “Bobeobi,” in which the poet attributes colors to letters to create a portrait of a face. The book also contains a postscript with reflections on language, history, and numbers and their role in the cycles of history. Illustrations by Pavel Filonov and Kazimir Malevich are included. Khlebnikov was born in Astrakhan Province and lived most of his life in Kazan. He attended ...
Roar! Gauntlets, 1908–1914
This work is a collection of poems, plays, and essays by the Russian futurist Velimir Khlebnikov (born Viktor Khlebnikov, 1885–1922). It opens with Khlebnikov’s statement on the unity of Slavs in the aftermath of the annexation of Bosnia and Herzegovina by Austria-Hungary in 1908. The book includes a segment of his poem “The Wood Nymph and the Goblin,” the play Asparuh, and the drama in verse Marquise Dezes. It concludes with Khlebnikov’s reflections on railroads. The volume is illustrated by Kazimir Malevich and Vladimir Burliuk. Khlebnikov was ...
Wilhelm's Merry-Go-Round: "Outside of Paris My Army Is Being Defeated…"
This World War I propaganda poster, designed by Kazimir Malevich (1878–1935), depicts the German army defeated by the Allies on the outskirts of Paris in the fall of 1914. On the right, German soldiers are seen dying under a barrage of artillery. Gunfire belches from behind the city walls of Paris, visible in the top-left corner. In the center the figure of Kaiser Wilhelm II helplessly observes the collapse of the German offensive. The verse under the picture by Vladimir Mayakovsky reads: “Outside of Paris my army is being ...
What Crackle, What Thunder
This World War I propaganda poster by Kazimir Malevich refers to a battle near Lomza (present-day Poland), where despite initial success, the Russians suffered heavy losses. A heroic Russian peasant figure slashing German soldiers with his scythe dominates the view. His traditional dress and lapti (woven bark shoes) seem to epitomize Russia’s strength and invincibility. German soldiers are running away or lie dead. Under the picture is a verse by Vladimir Mayakovsky that reads: “What crackle, what thunder there was from the Germans at Lomza!” In the early stages ...
A Sausage Maker Came to Lodz. We Said to Him: "Welcome, Sir!...”
This World War I propaganda poster, by Kazimir Malevich in collaboration with Vladimir Mayakovsky, depicts a Russian peasant and the German Army he is portrayed as having defeated. The oversized peasant on the left panel is greeting the German emperor, who moves towards him with his army of cheerful soldiers, confident of victory. On the right side, the peasant walks away after having crushed the enemy. With his army destroyed, the emperor is dismayed. The verse by Mayakovsky below the images reads: “A sausage maker came to Lodz. We said ...