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A Most Accurate Picture of Brazil
This early map showing Bahia state in Brazil is the work of Henricus Hondius (died 1638), a member of a famous Dutch mapmaking family. His father, Jodocus Hondius (1563-1612), acquired the plates for Gerard Mercator’s Atlas in 1604, and in 1606 published a new edition of this work. Henricus and his brother-in-law, Jan Jannson (died 1664), published the Novus Atlas (New atlas) in 1637. Dutch maps of the 16th century were marked by illustrated inserts, as seen on this map, and were generally the work of mapmaking families.
Contributed by
National Library of Brazil
Venezuela with the Southern Part of New Andalusia
This 17th-century map of Venezuela and a part of New Andalusia, provinces of the Spanish Empire located in present-day Venezuela, is a copy of an earlier map published in Amsterdam by Henricus Hondius (1597–1651). Hondius was the son of Jodocus Hondius (1563–1612), a Flemish cartographer and engraver who settled in Amsterdam in about 1593 and established a business that produced globes and the first large maps of the world. In 1604 Hondius acquired the plates for Mercator’s world atlas and in 1606 published a new edition of ...
Contributed by
Columbus Memorial Library, Organization of American States
Venezuela Together with the Southern Part of New Andalusia
Henricus Hondius (1597-1651) was the son of Jodocus Hondius (1563-1612), a Flemish cartographer and engraver who settled in Amsterdam in about 1593 and established a business that produced globes and the first large maps of the world. In 1604, Hondius acquired the plates for Mercator’s world atlas and in 1606 published a new edition of this famous work. Following Hondius’ death in 1612, Henricus and his brother Jodocus carried on the family business. With his brother-in-law Johann Jansson, Henricus continued publication of what became known as the Mercator-Hondius atlas ...
Contributed by
Library of Congress
The Situation of the Promised Land Accurately Reveals a Knowledge of the Holy Bible
This copperplate engraving of the Holy Land is the first in a series of reprints of a map by Christiaan van Adrichem (1533-85) by Dutch publishers in the 17th century. Adrichem was a Roman Catholic priest and biblical scholar, and the map depicts the Holy Land as Adrichem conceived it, based on his study of the scriptures. The map was printed in Amsterdam in 1633 by Henricus Hondius (1597-1651), and was included in a new edition of the Atlas ou representation du monde universel (Atlas, or universal representation of the ...
Contributed by
National Library of Israel