157 results in English
It is Nice in the Surf but What about the Men in the Trenches? Go and Help
This 1917 Australian poster is representative of many used to recruit volunteers to serve with the British forces in World War I. Australian recruitment drives were highly successful and resulted in more than 400,000 men enlisting from a population of fewer than five million. Posters such as this one appealed to the Australian value of “mateship” or comradeship, while others appealed to patriotism. In addition to the young man swimming in the surf, the poster features the emblem of the Win the War League, an organization founded in 1917 ...
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Australia has Promised Britain 50,000 More Men; Will You Help Us Keep that Promise
In World War I, all sides used posters as tools to mobilize their populations for the war effort. Australia fought on the side of its “mother country,” Great Britain. Australian soldiers suffered heavy casualties in the Gallipoli campaign and in the trenches on the Western front. Casualties led to recruiting drives intended to attract new enlistments. This poster by an unidentified artist appeals to the strong sense of loyalty to Britain felt by the Australian people. It shows a kangaroo in front of number 50,000 and in the background ...
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Subscribe to the 8th War Loan
In World War I, all sides used posters as tools to mobilize their populations for the war effort. This poster, published in Vienna in 1918, shows a little girl reaching through a number "8" to deposit a coin into a pile below, an advertisement for the eighth war loan being raised by Austria-Hungary, Germany’s chief ally in the war. The artist who designed the poster was Alfred Offner. Born in Czernowitz in 1879, Offner was a painter and graphic artist who was associated with the Vienna Secession, a group ...
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Union Bank, 8th War Loan; Peace Through Victory
In World War I, all sides used posters as tools to mobilize their populations for the war effort. This poster, published in Vienna in 1918, is an advertisement for the eighth war loan being raised by Austria-Hungary, Germany’s chief ally in the war. It shows a young woman offering a bowl of coins at an altar decorated with the Austrian coat of arms. The artist was Thomas Fasche, who created several other World War I posters, but about whom little is known.
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National War Relief Exhibition
In World War I, all sides used posters as tools to mobilize their populations for the war effort. This poster, published in Pozsony (present-day Bratislava, Slovakia) in 1917, shows a disabled veteran with a prosthetic arm using a scythe to harvest wheat. The text announces the National War Relief Exhibition in Pozsony. The poster was created by Pal Sujan, a popular artist whose portraits and other paintings were widely shown in the Austro-Hungarian Empire. Sujan was born in Budapest in 1880, studied art, and worked as an art teacher in ...
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Now Slovakia Arises. It's Pulling off Its Shackles
This World War I poster showing soldiers and the Slovak coat of arms is one of a series by Czech artist Vojtěch Preissig (1873–1944) urging Czech and Slovak volunteers living in the United States to fight with the Czechoslovak Legion against Germany and Austria-Hungary. The Czech lands and Slovakia were at that time part of Austria-Hungary and leaders of the national independence movement believed that the cause of an independent Czechoslovak state could be furthered by fighting on the Allied side. In December 1917, the government of France approved ...
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French-Canadians: Enlist!: Re-form the Salaberry Riflery Regiments
In World War I, all sides used posters as tools to mobilize their populations for the war effort. This recruitment poster from Canada was directed at French-speaking Canadians, with the warning that “England, bulwark of our liberties, is threatened.” The call to re-form the Salaberry rifle regiments refers back to the War of 1812 between Britain and the United States, when Major Charles de Salaberry, a member of a distinguished Quebec family, was given command of a new regiment, recruited from among French Canadians, to defend against a possible American ...
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Bushmen and Sawmill Hands Wanted. Join the 224th Canadian Forestry Battalion
In World War I, all sides used posters as tools to mobilize their populations for the war effort. This poster by an unknown artist appeals to men with logging and sawmill experience to join a new military unit being formed in Canada. In 1916, the British government asked the government of Canada to recruit a specialized forestry battalion for service in Britain and France, where forestry skills were in short supply. In a period of six weeks, over 1,600 men were recruited for the unit, which was assigned such ...
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Fight for Her. Come with the Irish Canadian Rangers Overseas Battalion, Montreal
In World War I, many Irish immigrants to Canada volunteered to serve in the Canadian armed forces. To assist with recruitment, the Canadian government established a purely Irish battalion, the Irish Canadian Rangers 199th Overseas Battalion. Based in Montreal, the unit began signing up volunteers in the winter of 1915–16. Also known as the Duchess of Connaught's Own Irish Rangers, after their royal patron, wife of Prince Arthur, Duke of Connaught and the governor-general of Canada, the rangers sailed for Europe in December 1916, and made a triumphal ...
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Deposit Your Gold for France. Gold Fights for Victory
This World War I poster, published in Paris in 1915, urges French citizens to deposit their gold coins “for France,” using the slogan “Gold fights for victory." Gold was needed by the French government to purchase wartime supplies from the United States and other countries, hence the appeal for citizens to transform their gold coins into bank deposits. The focal point of the poster, the gold coin embossed with the emblematic and iconic Gallic rooster (le coq gaulois) shown to be crushing a German soldier, epitomizes this idea. The poster ...
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My Dear Home, I Love You, You’re a House for Each of Us and Home for All of Us
This World War I poster, published in 1918, shows a Young Men’s Christian Association (YMCA) hut set in the woods, with soldiers outside relaxing and playing games. A red and blue YMCA sign is visible over the door. At the bottom of the poster is a quotation, “My dear home, I love you, you’re the house for each of us and home for all of us,” which is attributed to a poilu (French slang for a front-line soldier). The YMCA was founded in 1844 by George Williams, a ...
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Let's Take Care of the Poultry. I am a Fine War Hen. I Eat Little and Produce a Lot
This small poster, produced in France in 1918, features a hen sitting atop a pile of eggs beneath the caption, "Let's take care of the poultry," and above the main caption which reads: "I am a fine war hen. I eat little and produce a lot." The aim of the poster was to encourage the French population to conserve food and other scarce goods in order to support the war effort. Unlike many posters, which were produced by professional artists, this work was designed by a 16-year-old student, who ...
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Subscribe to the War Loan! The Army and Navy Expect it from You!
In World War I, all sides used posters as tools to mobilize their populations for the war effort. This 1917 poster, created by the influential German designer and graphic artist Lucian Bernhard, appeals to German citizens to help finance the war with their savings. Bernhard was born in 1883, and his original name was Emil Kahn. After studying at the Munich Art Academy, he moved to Berlin where he worked as a commercial artist. He was best known for his innovative advertising posters for German companies. Bernhard emphasized simplicity as ...
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Tonhalle: Exhibition of Works by German Prisoners of War Interned in Switzerland
This poster advertises an exhibition of artwork by interned German prisoners of war at the Tonhalle in Zurich, Switzerland, in May–June 1918. The location, times of opening, and the entry fee of 20 pfennigs are indicated. Exhibition proceeds were to benefit a Bavarian organization that assisted prisoners of war. The poster features the image of a German soldier who seems to be lost in thought, seated in front of the symbol for the Red Cross. Under arrangements worked out by the Red Cross in late 1914 and implemented starting ...
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Plant Oils! Plant Sunflowers and Poppies, and You Then Create German Oils and Serve the Fatherland!
This World War I poster shows a sign, with a songbird perched on it, in a bed of poppies and sunflowers. The text on the sign encourages the planting of sunflowers and poppies to produce oil and provides the address in Berlin of the War Committee for Oils and Fats, where seeds and instructions for planting can be obtained. Germany suffered severe shortages of food during the war because of the British blockade, which sharply cut imports of food and fertilizers. Efforts were made to increase domestic production to make ...
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For the Country, My Eyes. For Peace, Your Money
This World War I poster, published in Turin, shows a blinded Italian soldier with bloodstained bandages wrapped around his eyes. Like most belligerents in World War I, Italy had to raise funds to support its war effort by issuing war bonds, which were essentially interest-bearing loans that citizens made to the government. The appeals to patriotism and to the sacrifices by the soldiers at the front are typical of war bond posters produced in Italy and other countries. This poster was created by artist Alfredo Ortelli and advertises the Consolidated ...
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"A Happy New Year to Our Gallant Soldiers!" You Can Make It Certain If You Join Now
This poster created in early 1915, designed and printed by Johnson, Riddle & Company for the Parliamentary Recruiting Committee in the United Kingdom, shows British soldiers marching toward victory in World War I. After Britain declared war on Germany on August 4, 1914, posters such as this were used to encourage men to enlist in the armed forces. The optimistic visual imagery promised victory in the new year, provided enough men joined the fight. In the early months of the conflict, many people in Britain believed that the war would be ...
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"The Child at Your Door." 400,000 Orphans Starving, No State Aid Available. Campaign for $30,000,000
The American Committee for Armenian and Syrian Relief was established in 1915 with the cooperation of the United States Department of State, for the purpose of providing humanitarian relief to Armenians forcibly deported from Anatolia to other parts of the Ottoman Empire during World War I. The Ottoman parliament passed a law by which privately collected funds from the United States could be distributed to displaced Armenians via the U.S. Embassy in Constantinople. The committee, which raised millions of dollars at public rallies and churches, issued this poster as ...
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"Times Are Hard Your Majesty - You Leave Us Nothing to Do"
This U.S. World War I propaganda poster shows a devil, accompanied by two smaller devils, telling Kaiser Wilhelm II of Germany that he was leaving them with no work to do. On the left is shown the home of the devils, a cave with its opening covered with cobwebs, over which hangs a sign, “To Let.” Using a word from the Hebrew Bible identified with Hell, the cave is called the “Gehenna Apartments.” The Kaiser has a bloody sword extending from beneath his cape. Also shown is the Kaiser ...
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Kościuszko, Pułaski—They Fought for Liberty in America
This Polish-language poster, produced in Brooklyn, New York, in 1917, shortly after the United States entered World War I, was aimed at the many Polish-speaking immigrants living in the United States at that time. The message— “Kościuszko, Pułaski fought for liberty in America. Can you help America fight for freedom in Poland? Eat less sugar, wheat, meat, fats so that we can support our brothers fighting in the allied armies”—invokes the names of two Poles. Tadeusz Kosciusko and Kazimierz Pulaski fought on the American side in the Revolutionary War ...
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1914! The Murderers!
This poster, designed by the graphic artist Maurice Louis Henri Neumont (1868–1930) and produced in Paris in 1914 by Maison d’édition, depicts Kaiser Wilhelm II (1859–1941), emperor of Germany during World War I, and Franz Joseph I (1830–1916), emperor of Austria-Hungary until the third year of the war, as “murderers.” Each carries a knife, and behind them is a looming image of the imperial eagle of Germany, dripping blood. The papers on the ground show the international agreements and principles of international law that the emperors ...
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3 A.M. in a London Station Hut
This poster, produced by an unknown publisher in England in 1915, shows a Young Men’s Christian Association (YMCA) facility for soldiers, with men sleeping on couches, in chairs, and on the floor in the middle of the night. The YMCA was founded in 1844 by George Williams, a worker in the London drapery trade who was concerned about the welfare of his fellow workers. The YMCA spread to other British cities in the 1840s and became a global organization in the 1850s. During World War I, the YMCA provided ...
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3,000,000 Belgians are Destitute in Belgium. They Must Not Starve. Support the Local Fund
This poster, designed by British illustrator John Hassall (1868–1948) and issued in 1915 for the National Committee for Relief in Belgium (London), depicts a personified image of Britannia offering solace to a mother and her children. The text calls attention to three million destitute Belgians and urges British citizens to contribute to their relief. In the early weeks of World War I, the German military marched through Belgium on its way into France. Germany soon occupied most of Belgium, a densely populated country that relied on imports for most ...
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4 Reasons for Buying Victory Bonds
This World War I poster, produced in Canada in 1917, depicts “4 reasons for buying Victory Bonds.” The “reasons” are the four most important German civilian and military leaders, whose faces would have been familiar to many Canadians from news reports: Kaiser Wilhelm II, the German emperor; Field Marshal Paul von Hindenburg, the chief of the German General Staff; Crown Prince Wilhelm, the son of the emperor and heir to the throne; and Grand Admiral Alfred von Tirpitz, commander of the German Navy. Canada, a dominion within the British Empire ...
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A Woman Stands Disconsolate, as Another Bends over a Dead Soldier; A House Burns in the Background
This 1915 poster by Welsh artist Gerald Spencer Pryse (1882–1956) depicts a disconsolate woman, a second woman bending over a dead soldier, and a house burning in the background, all before a colorless, empty sky. Pryse created many lithographic posters based on his experiences in the British army in France and Belgium during World War I, where he served as a dispatch rider and became a decorated British officer. He later gained an official appointment as a war artist, although he had been producing lithographs all along. Pryse witnessed ...
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Help Us Win! The Commercial Bank of Italy
Published in Milan, Italy, sometime between 1915 and 1918, this poster shows an Italian soldier holding his bayoneted rifle in one hand and pointing off to the viewer’s right with the other. Behind him a fire rages. The text urges citizens to “Help us win!” and advertises the latest subscription for war bonds sold through the Commercial Bank of Italy. Like most belligerents in World War I, Italy had to raise funds by issuing war bonds, which were essentially interest-bearing loans that citizens made to the government. Campaigns supported ...
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All in One with the Irish Canadian Rangers 199th Overseas Battalion
In World War I, many Irish immigrants to Canada volunteered to serve in the Canadian armed forces. To assist with recruitment, the Canadian government established a purely Irish battalion, the Irish Canadian Rangers 199th Overseas Battalion. Based in Montreal, the unit began signing up volunteers in the winter of 1915–16. Also known as the Duchess of Connaught's Own Irish Rangers, after their royal patron, wife of Prince Arthur, Duke of Connaught and Governor-General of Canada, the rangers sailed for Europe in December 1916 and made a triumphal tour ...
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American Library Association, Library War Service
When the United States entered World War I in 1917, the American Library Association established a Committee on Mobilization and War Service Plans, which was invited by the Department of War’s Commission on Training Camp Activities to provide library services to U.S. soldiers and sailors in the United States and overseas. ALA's wartime program became known as the Library War Service and was directed by Herbert Putnam, Librarian of Congress. Between 1917 and 1920, ALA mounted two financial campaigns and raised $5 million from public donations, erected ...
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America's Answer: The Second Official United States War Picture
This World War I poster advertises the film America’s Answer, which was made by the Division of Films of the Committee on Public Information, a government body established in the United States to foster public unity and generate support for the war. The committee was headed by muckraking journalist George Creel (1876–1953). The film, which was released in U.S. theaters on July 14, 1918, is a documentary (part of the Following the Flag to France series) about the arrival in France of the first half-million American troops ...
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America's Tribute to Britain
This poster, showing a bald eagle placing a victory wreath on a lion's head, is from 1917, the year that the United States entered World War I on the side of Great Britain. The lion is a traditional symbol of England, the largest of the countries that make up the United Kingdom (the others being Scotland, Wales, and, at this time, Ireland). The symbol goes back to the 12th century, when King Richard I (1157–99), known as Richard the Lionheart, chose three lions as his symbol in battle ...
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Appeal to Women. Make Every Penny Do the Work of Two. Put Your Savings in the War Loan
During World War I, the British government relied heavily on loans to finance the cost of the war. The Treasury issued its first war loan in November 1914 at an interest rate of 3.5 percent, followed by a second loan in June 1915 at 4.5 percent. Citizens were exhorted to forgo consumption and put their savings into the loans. This 1915 poster, showing ribbons linking Wedgewood-style plaques that depict soldiers and military scenes, appears aimed at affluent women with savings to spare. The poster was issued by the ...
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Are YOU in This?
This 1915 poster, published in London for the Parliamentary Recruiting Committee, shows soldiers and other citizens busy with war work, as a well-dressed man looks on pensively. The man is clearly being urged to enlist. Until March 2, 1916, when the Military Service Act introduced conscription, Great Britain’s World War I army was comprised entirely of volunteers, and many of the most famous wartime posters were recruitment appeals. The Parliamentary Recruiting Committee was set up following the outbreak of war in August 1914. A cross-party organization chaired by the ...
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Weapons for Death -- Weapons for Life! Subscribe to the Victory Loan
This World War I poster from Italy shows two young men working at a forge, making a plow. The caption calls on Italians to subscribe to the victory loan. Like most belligerents in World War I, Italy had to raise funds by issuing war bonds, which were essentially interest-bearing loans that citizens made to the government. Campaigns supported by posters such as this had two purposes. One was to urge citizens to lend money to the government to finance the war. The other was to promote patriotic fervor in support ...
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At the Front! Every Fit Briton Should Join Our Brave Men at the Front. Enlist Now
Until March 2, 1916, when the Military Service Act introduced conscription, Great Britain’s World War I army was comprised entirely of volunteers. Many of the most famous wartime posters were recruitment appeals. This 1915 poster, published in London for the Parliamentary Recruiting Committee, shows cavalry in battle, with horses reacting to an explosion in the foreground. It calls upon every physically and mentally fit Briton to enlist. The Parliamentary Recruiting Committee was set up following the outbreak of war in August 1914. A cross-party organization chaired by the prime ...
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Attention! The German Viper is Taken. It is Now Necessary to Pull Out the Poisonous Teeth!
This 1919 poster, made in Italy just after the close of World War I, shows a hand strangling a snake decorated with the German Iron Cross. The text reads: “Attention! The German viper is taken! It is now necessary to pull out the poisonous teeth!” Italy and Germany were allies during World War II, but they were enemies during World War I. Italy entered the war on the side of Britain and France on May 23, 1915, by declaring war on Austria-Hungary. Under the terms of a secret treaty concluded ...
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The Boys are Doing Splendidly in Egypt, Mesopotamia, France. Another Bahamas Contingent Will be Sailing Soon. Roll Up Men. Make it the Best. God Save the King!
This World War I poster, published in Kingston, Jamaica in 1915, was used to recruit volunteers for the British West Indies Regiment (BWIR), which was established late that year by the British War Office. The regiment ultimately was composed of 12 battalions, which served in different theaters of the war, including Egypt and Palestine, Mesopotamia, France and Flanders, and Italy. The poster appeals to imperial patriotism by showing a small portrait of King George V, who supported formation of the regiment. A total of 397 officers and 15,204 men ...
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Back Them Up. Invest in the War Loan
This 1915 poster issued in London by the Parliamentary War Savings Committee shows a well-dressed, prosperous man reaching into his pocket as he watches soldiers and artillery pass by in the background. The caption reads: "My duty." During World War I, the British government relied heavily on loans to finance the cost of the war. The Treasury issued its first war loan in November 1914 at an interest rate of 3.5 percent, followed by a second loan in June 1915 at 4.5 percent. The Parliamentary War Savings Committee ...
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Battles Give Way to Sports in A.E.F.
This World War I recruiting poster shows scenes of military life in France, featuring sporting and recreational events with soldiers of the American Expeditionary Forces (AEF). The text states: “How would you like to be with Uncle Sam's privileged tourists? Why worry about the hot weather or a job? Take a cool and comfortable ocean voyage. See Hawaii, Panama, or the Philippines, and better yourself by attending the Vocational Schools. Earn - Learn - Travel. Enlist in the U.S. Army.” The photographs show pole vaulting, boxing, swimming, a mule race ...
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Images and Sketches from Turkey in the World War
This World War I poster advertises an exhibition of artwork from Turkey by the Austro-Hungarian artist Wilhelm Victor Krausz (1878–1959), organized to benefit soldiers wounded in the war. The poster shows a mosque on a hillside in the distance, surrounded by trees. Krausz was active in Turkey, an ally of Austria-Hungary and Germany, during the war, and is known for his portraits of Turkish officers and Turkish scenes, including his portrait of Colonel Mustafa Kemal Bey, the future President Kemal Atatürk. This poster is from the Rehse-Archiv für Zeitgeschichte ...
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God Strikes at an Injustice with a Thunderbolt, and a Young Man with Bullets
This World War I poster showing a man with an axe and a rifle joining a battle is one of a series by the Czech artist Vojtěch Preissig (1873–1944) that encouraged Czech and Slovak volunteers living in the United States to join the Czechoslovak Legion to fight against Austria-Hungary and Germany. The Czech lands and Slovakia were at that time part of Austria-Hungary and leaders of the national independence movement believed that the cause of an independent Czechoslovak state could be furthered by fighting on the Allied side. Preissig ...
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Boys to the Farm. Bring Your Chum and Do Your Bit
In World War I, Canada established a Soldiers of the Soil corps under which boys aged 15 to 19 were asked to volunteer their summers to work on farms, replacing farmhands who had enlisted for military service. In all, 22,385 boys signed up as farm “soldiers.” This poster, issued by the Canada Food Board, is an appeal for farm labor. It shows a boy wearing a Soldiers of the Soil uniform blowing a bugle to summon others to the corps. In the background, other boys wearing the uniform of ...
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Britain Expects Every Son of Israel to do His Duty
This 1918 World War I recruiting poster was designed to encourage Jewish immigrants to Canada to enlist in the Canadian armed forces to help the Allied war effort against Germany and Austria-Hungary. Underlining British sympathy for the oppressed Jewish populations of central and eastern Europe, the poster shows a soldier cutting the bonds from a Jewish man, who strains to join a group of soldiers running in the distance and says, "You have cut my bonds and set me free—now let me help you set others free!" The message ...
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