The Pantheon and the Rue Soufflot, Paris, France
This photochrome print is part of “Views of Architecture, Monuments, and Other Sites in France” from the catalog of the Detroit Publishing Company (1905). Located in the Fifth Arrondissement (district) of Paris near the Luxembourg Gardens, the Panthéon was described in the 1900 edition of Baedeker's Paris and its Environs, with routes from London to Paris: Handbook for Travellers as standing “on the highest ground in the quarters of the city on the left bank, occupying the site of the tomb of Ste. Genevieve (422–512), the patron saint ...
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Place de la Republique, Paris, France
This photochrome print of Paris is part of “Views of Architecture, Monuments, and Other Sites in France” from the catalog of the Detroit Publishing Company (1905). The 1900 edition of Baedeker's Paris and its Environs, with routes from London to Paris: Handbook for Travellers described the Place de la République, formerly known as the Place du Château-d’Eau, as “one of the finest squares in Paris.” The square was redesigned and restructured to its present state in the 1850s by Baron Georges-Eugène Haussmann (1809–1891), who is known for ...
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The Dome des Invalides, Paris, France
This photochrome print of Paris is part of “Views of Architecture, Monuments, and Other Sites in France” from the catalog of the Detroit Publishing Company (1905). The Dôme des Invalides comprises a section of the Eglise Saint-Louis des Invalides (Church of Les Invalides), which contains the tomb of Emperor Napoleon I. Les Invalides, which occupies about 12 hectares of land, was founded by Louis XIV in 1670. It was designed by Libéral Bruant (circa 1635–97) in the classical French architectural style as a facility to provide elderly, injured, or ...
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The Trocadero, Exposition Universal, 1900, Paris, France
This photochrome print is part of “Views of Architecture, Monuments, and Other Sites in France” from the catalog of the Detroit Publishing Company (1905). Located in the 16th Arrondissement (district), the Trocadéro area of Paris occupies a height above the River Seine and is named in honor of the 1823 Battle of Trocadéro, in which French forces intervened in neighboring Spain to restore the rule of King Ferdinand VII. Shown here is the Palais du Trocadéro, which the 1900 edition of Baedeker's Paris and its Environs, with routes from ...
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Eiffel Tower, Full-view Looking Toward the Trocadero, Exposition Universal, 1900, Paris, France
This photochrome print of the Eiffel Tower is part of “Views of Architecture, Monuments, and Other Sites in France” from the catalog of the Detroit Publishing Company (1905). Built by Gustave Eiffel in 1887–89 as the centerpiece of the Exposition Universelle (Universal Exhibition) of 1889, the 10,000-ton, 300-meter iron structure is one of the best known monuments in Paris. The 1900 edition of Baedeker's Paris and its Environs, with routes from London to Paris: Handbook for Travellers: Paris and its Environs declared the tower “the loftiest monument ...
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Champs de Mars, Exposition Universal, 1900, Paris, France
This photochrome print of the Champs de Mars in Paris is part of “Views of Architecture, Monuments, and Other Sites in France” from the catalog of the Detroit Publishing Company (1905). The Champs de Mars stretches between the Eiffel Tower and the imposing Ecole Militaire in Paris’s Seventh Arrondissement (district). The 1900 edition of Baedeker's Paris and its Environs, with routes from London to Paris: Handbook for Travellers described the park as “a large sandy space, 1100 yds. in length and 550 yds. in breadth,” which until 1889 ...
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Notre Dame, and St. Michael Bridge, Paris, France
This photochrome print of Paris, part of “Views of Architecture, Monuments, and Other Sites in France” from the catalog of the Detroit Publishing Company (1905), offers a view of Notre Dame Cathedral and the Pont St. Michel. Located on the Ile-de-la-Cité in the River Seine, the cathedral is known for its magnificent Gothic architecture, stained glass windows, and statuary depicting figures and scenes from the Bible. Construction of Notre Dame began in 1163, on the site of a fourth-century church. The most distinctive features of the church, the two Western ...
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The Madeleine, Paris, France
This photochrome print of the Madeleine, or L'Eglise Sainte-Marie-Madeleine (Church of St. Mary Magdalene) in Paris is part of “Views of Architecture, Monuments, and Other Sites in France” in the catalog of the Detroit Publishing Company (1905). Construction of a church on the site of the Madeleine began in 1764 under the direction of chief architect Pierre Contant d'Ivry (1698–1777), but was halted during the French Revolution of 1789–97. In 1806, the Emperor Napoleon I ordered the original church to be razed and commissioned Pierre-Alexandre Barthélémy ...
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The Louvre, Paris, France
This photochrome print of the Louvre is part of “Views of Architecture, Monuments, and Other Sites in France” from the catalog of the Detroit Publishing Company (1905). The 1900 edition of Baedeker's Paris and its Environs, with routes from London to Paris: Handbook for Travellers characterized the Louvre as "the most important public building at Paris, both architecturally and on account of its treasures of art . . . , a palace of vast extent, rising between the Rue de Rivoli and the Seine." Baedeker explained that “it is usually supposed that Philip ...
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Place du Chatelet, Paris, France
This photochrome print of the Place du Châtelet in Paris is part of “Views of Architecture, Monuments, and Other Sites in France” from the catalog of the Detroit Publishing Company (1905). This public square is located on what was once the site of the medieval fortress of Grand Châtelet, which was built around 1130 by King Louis VI to defend the Ile de la Cité, the island in the River Seine that constitutes the historic center of Paris. Later in the 12th century, the fortress became a prison, which it ...
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Hôtel de Ville, Paris, France
This photochrome print of the Hôtel de Ville, or Paris city hall, is part of “Views of Architecture, Monuments, and Other Sites in France” from the catalog of the Detroit Publishing Company (1905). The building depicted is the reconstructed version of the original Hôtel de Ville, which was built in 1533 and destroyed in 1871 during the upheavals of the Paris Commune. The reconstruction, undertaken by the French architects Theodore Ballu (1817–85) and Edouard Deperthes (1833–98), took place between 1876 and 1884 and resulted in an enlarged and ...
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The Tuileries Garden, Paris, France
This photochrome print of the Jardin des Tuileries in Paris is part of “Views of Architecture, Monuments, and Other Sites in France” from the catalog of the Detroit Publishing Company (1905). Located next to the palace of Louvre, the Tuileries is the site of a palace and royal residence with a large garden originally built for Catherine de Medici in 1564. During the reign of Louis XIV, the celebrated landscape gardener André Le Nôtre (1613–1700) laid out the basic features of the garden, which included a grand allée that ...
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The Luxembourg Palace, Paris, France
This photochrome print of the Palais du Luxembourg is part of “Views of Architecture, Monuments, and Other Sites in France” from the catalog of the Detroit Publishing Company (1905). This palace, which today is the seat of the French Senate, was built between 1615 and 1620 by the French architect Salomon de Brosse (1571–1626) on the site of an older palace, the Hotel du Luxembourg. According to the 1900 edition of Baedeker's Paris and its Environs, with routes from London to Paris: Handbook for Travellers, the palace “bears ...
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Place de la Bastille, Paris, France
This photochrome print of Place de la Bastille in Paris is part of “Views of Architecture, Monuments, and Other Sites in France” from the catalog of the Detroit Publishing Company (1905). The Bastille (“little bastion”), formally known as the Bastille Saint-Antoine, was built between 1370 and 1383 as a fortress to protect the city of Paris during the Hundred Years’ War. The fortress was converted into a prison in the early 17th century, and the storming of the Bastille by an enraged crowd on July 14, 1789 marked the beginning ...
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The Opera House, Paris, France
This photochrome print of the Palais Garnier in Paris is part of “Views of Architecture, Monuments, and Other Sites in France” from the catalog of the Detroit Publishing Company (1905). In 1858, Emperor Napoleon III ordered the construction of a new opera house to accommodate the Paris opera and ballet companies. The building was designed by Charles Garnier (1825–98) in the Beaux-Arts style and was constructed between 1862 and 1874. The 1900 edition of Baedeker's Paris and its Environs, with routes from London to Paris: Handbook for Travellers ...
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Arc de Triomphe, de l'Etoile, Paris, France
This photochrome print of the Arc de Triomphe is part of “Views of Architecture, Monuments, and Other Sites in France” from the catalog of the Detroit Publishing Company (1905). Standing at one end of the Champs-Elysées, the Arc de Triomphe was commissioned by Napoleon I to honor the French army. Construction began in 1806, but was halted after the Bourbon restoration of 1815. It was resumed in the 1830s by King Louis-Philippe and completed in 1836. The three architects associated with the project were Jean Chalgrin (active 1806-11), L. Joust ...
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Champs Elysees, an Avenue, Paris, France
This photochrome print of the Champs-Elysées in Paris is part of “Views of Architecture, Monuments, and Other Sites in France” from the catalog of the Detroit Publishing Company (1905). The area of the Champs-Elysées originally consisted of fields and market-gardens. In 1616, Marie de Medici (1575–1642), the widow of Henri IV, extended the Tuileries gardens to create a walkway flanked by trees. The pathway was further extended in 1667 by the landscape architect André Le Nôtre (1613–1700). The avenue, now nearly two kilometers long, stretches between Place de ...
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Place de la Concorde, Paris, France
This photochrome print of the Place de la Concorde is part of “Views of Architecture, Monuments, and Other Sites in France” from the catalog of the Detroit Publishing Company (1905). The 1900 edition of Baedeker’s Paris and its Environs, with routes from London to Paris: Handbook for Travellers informed its readers that this famous square was 390 yards long and 235 yards wide, and was bounded on the south by the River Seine, on the west by the Champs-Elysees, on the north by the Ministère de la Marine and ...
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