17 results in English
Cathedral of SS, Peter and Paul, St. Petersburg, Russia
This photochrome print of the Cathedral of Saints Peter and Paul, the patron saints of St. Petersburg, is part of “Views of Architecture and Other Sites Primarily in Poland, Russia, and the Ukraine” from the catalog of the Detroit Publishing Company (1905). Construction of a wooden church on the site of the cathedral began in 1703, one month after the city of St. Petersburg was officially founded. The church was consecrated on April 1, 1704. The stone cathedral was built between 1712 and 1733, under the direction of the Swiss-Italian ...
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The Winter Palace Place and Alexander's Column, St. Petersburg, Russia
This photochrome print of the Winter Palace and Alexander’s Column in St. Petersburg is part of “Views of Architecture and Other Sites Primarily in Poland, Russia, and the Ukraine” from the catalog of the Detroit Publishing Company (1905). The Winter Palace was built between 1754 and 1762 for Empress Elizabeth, the daughter of Peter the Great (1672-1725), and served as the residence of the Russian tsars from the 1760s until the revolution of 1917. The Baroque-style building measures more than 17,000 square meters and is distinguished by its ...
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The Newsky, (i.e., Nevskii), Prospekt and the Admiralty, St. Petersburg, Russia
This photochrome print of the Nevsky Prospect and the Admiralty in St. Petersburg is part of “Views of Architecture and Other Sites Primarily in Poland, Russia, and the Ukraine” from the catalog of the Detroit Publishing Company (1905). In his novel, Nevsky Prospect, Gogol wrote of the street, “Step into it, and you step into a fairground.” Named for Alexander Nevsky (1220–63), the 13th-century hero who led Russian armies to victory over German and Swedish invaders, Nevsky Prospekt was planned by Peter the Great (1672-1725) and designed by the ...
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Peter the Great Place, St. Petersburg, Russia
This photochrome print of Peter the Great Place in St. Petersburg is part of “Views of Architecture and Other Sites Primarily in Poland, Russia, and the Ukraine” from the catalog of the Detroit Publishing Company (1905). The statue, which stands beside the Neva River, just before St. Isaac's Cathedral (visible in the background), is famous as the “Bronze Horseman” of Alexander Pushkin's narrative poem of 1833. The statue was commissioned by Catherine II (1762–96) to honor Peter I. A model was made by French sculptor Etienne Maurice ...
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Kasan Cathedral, St. Petersburg, Russia
This photochrome print of the Kazan Cathedral, also known as the Cathedral of Our Lady of Kazan, in St. Petersburg, is part of “Views of Architecture and Other Sites Primarily in Poland, Russia, and the Ukraine” from the catalog of the Detroit Publishing Company (1905). The cathedral takes its name from Our Lady of Kazan, the most venerated icon of the Russian Orthodox Church, and was designed by the Russian architect Andrey Voronikhin (1759–1814). According to Baedeker’s Russia with Teheran, Port Arthur, and Peking (1914), the cathedral is ...
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The Isaac Cathedral from Alexander's Garden, St. Petersburg, Russia
This photochrome print of St. Isaac’s Cathedral in St. Petersburg is part of “Views of Architecture and Other Sites Primarily in Poland, Russia, and the Ukraine” from the catalog of the Detroit Publishing Company (1905). Named after St. Isaac, the presumed patron saint of Peter the Great (1672-1725), the cathedral was commissioned by Alexander I (1777–1825) and was built between 1819 and 1858 under the direction of the French architect Richard de Montferrand (1786–1858). It is the largest cathedral in Russia. According to Baedeker’s Russia with ...
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Monument of Catherine II, St. Petersburg, Russia
This photochrome print of the Catherine II monument in St. Petersburg is part of “Views of Architecture and Other Sites Primarily in Poland, Russia, and the Ukraine” from the catalog of the Detroit Publishing Company (1905). Empress Catherine II, also known as Catherine the Great, ruled Russia from 1762 to 1796. She was much admired, particularly by the Russian nobility, who benefited from the reforms she instituted. The monument, erected in 1873, stands in a square just off of St. Petersburg’s main thoroughfare, Nevsky Prospekt. It was designed by ...
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Peterhof from Castle, St. Petersburg, Russia
This photochrome print of the palace of Peterhof in St. Petersburg is part of “Views of Architecture and Other Sites Primarily in Poland, Russia, and the Ukraine” from the catalog of the Detroit Publishing Company (1905). Based on a design by the French architect Alexandre Jean-Baptiste LeBlond (1679–1719), Peterhof is regarded as the Russian Versailles. It was built by Peter the Great (1672–1725) as a summer residence. Located on the shore of the Neva Bay (or Gulf of Kronstadt), the palace offers a view of Kronstadt, the city ...
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The Kremlin towards the Place Rouge, Moscow, Russia
This photochrome print of the Moscow Kremlin is part of “Views of Architecture and Other Sites Primarily in Poland, Russia, and the Ukraine” from the catalog of the Detroit Publishing Company (1905). The Kremlin is the seat of the Russian government. The word kremlin comes from the Russian for “fortification” or “citadel.” The first settlement on this site, a wooden fort, was built by the founder of Moscow, Yuri Dolgoruky, in 1147, but the structure was not given the name Kremlin until 1331. As described by Baedeker’s Russia with ...
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The Place Iljinka, (i.e., Il'inka), Moscow, Russia
This photochrome print of Place Ilinka in Moscow is part of “Views of Architecture and Other Sites Primarily in Poland, Russia, and the Ukraine” from the catalog of the Detroit Publishing Company (1905). Place Ilinka is located in Kitai-Gorod, an area near Red Square. As described in Baedeker’s Russia with Teheran, Port Arthur, and Peking (1914), “[the] central and main street of the Kitai-Gorod, almost exclusively occupied by wholesale houses and banks, is named the Ilyinka.” Kitai-Gorod was one of Moscow’s commercial centers, as evidenced by the construction ...
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Tworskoi (i.e., Tverskoi) Place, Moscow, Russia
This photochrome print of Tverskoi Place (Tverskaiaa Ploshchad) in Moscow is part of “Views of Architecture and Other Sites Primarily in Poland, Russia, and the Ukraine” from the catalog of the Detroit Publishing Company (1905). It provides a view from the back of the famous statue of the poet Alexander Pushkin (1799–1837) by the Russian sculptor Alexander Mikhailovich Opekushin (1838–1923). Made of bronze and standing on a marble plinth, the statue was funded by public subscription and unveiled in 1880.
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From the Ramparts of the Kremlin, Nigni-Novgorod, (i.e., Nizhnii Novgorod), Russia
This photochrome print of the ramparts of the Kremlin (fortress) in Nizhnii Novgorod is part of “Views of Architecture and Other Sites Primarily in Poland, Russia, and the Ukraine” from the catalog of the Detroit Publishing Company (1905). Located at the confluence of the Oka and Volga rivers in western Russia, Nizhnii-Novgorod was the capital of the Nizhnii-Novgorod principality from 1350 onward. The Kremlin constituted the political and historical center of the city. As described in Baedeker’s Russia with Teheran, Port Arthur, and Peking (1914), the Kremlin “occupies the ...
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St. Wladimir's (i.e., Vladimir's) Monument, Kiev, Russia, (i.e., Ukraine)
This photochrome print of St. Vladimir’s Monument in Kiev is part of “Views of Architecture and Other Sites Primarily in Poland, Russia, and the Ukraine” from the catalog of the Detroit Publishing Company (1905). The bronze monument, erected in 1853, stands atop Vladimirskaya Hill and towers over the Dnieper River. It is dedicated to Prince Vladimir Svyatoslavich (958–1015), or St. Vladimir, who brought Christianity to Kievan Rus in 988. The 20-meter monument was designed by sculptor Vasily Demuth-Malinovsky (1779–1846). The statue, which comprises only five meters of ...
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The Iron Bridge, Warsaw, Russia (i.e. Warsaw, Poland)
This photochrome print of Warsaw is part of “Views of Architecture and Other Sites Primarily in Poland, Russia, and the Ukraine” from the catalog of the Detroit Publishing Company (1905). It depicts the 512-meter bridge, previously known as the Alexander Bridge, constructed by Stanislaw Kierbedz (1810–99) in 1859–65. The first iron bridge to span the Vistula River, Kierbedz’s work was an early manifestation of Warsaw’s urbanization and industrialization. Baedeker’s Russia with Teheran, Port Arthur, and Peking (1914) described the structure as “an iron girder-bridge supported ...
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Monument of Alexander II, Helsingfors, Russia, i.e., Helsinki, Finland
This photochrome print of the statue of Alexander II in Senate Square in Helsinki is part of “Views of Architecture and Other Sites Primarily in Poland, Russia, and the Ukraine” from the catalog of the Detroit Publishing Company (1905). Alexander II (1818–81) was the tsar of the Russian Empire from 1855 to 1881. Finland became a grand duchy within the Russian Empire in 1809 and achieved independence from Russia only in 1917. This statue, which was designed by the Finnish sculptor Walter Runeberg (1838–1920) and completed in 1894 ...
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Military Road. Fortress in the Dariel Ravine, Caucasus, Russia
This photochrome print of the military road and fortress in the Dariel Ravine (or Gorge) in the Caucasus is part of “Views of Architecture and Other Sites Primarily in Poland, Russia, and the Ukraine” from the catalog of the Detroit Publishing Company (1905). In 1799–1863, the Russian military constructed the 220-kilometer Georgian Military Highway through the Dariel Pass in the rugged Caucasus Mountains. The road stretched from Vladikavkaz in Russia to Tbilisi in eastern Georgia. The Dariel Fortress (or the Fortress of Vladikavkaz), at the northern end of the ...
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Railway Bridge, Riga, Russia (i.e., Latvia)
This photochrome print of a bridge in Riga, Latvia (at the time part of the Russian Empire) is part of “Views of Architecture and Other Sites Primarily in Poland, Russia, and the Ukraine” from the catalog of the Detroit Publishing Company (1905). Constructed in 1871-72, the bridge was the first iron railway bridge to cross the Daugava River. Baedeker’s Russia with Teheran, Port Arthur, and Peking (1914) described it as “an iron Girder Bridge . . . 1/2 M. long, supported by eight granite piers,” which led to the Mitau suburb ...
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