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Blue Grotto, Capri Island, Italy
This photochrome print of the Blue Grotto (Grotta Azzurra) is part of “Views of Architecture and Other Sites in Italy” from the catalog of the Detroit Publishing Company (1905). Located on the island of Capri off the southern coast of Italy, the grotto is a natural wonder known for the brilliant and mystical blue hue of the walls and the water within. The grotto is approximately 50 meters long and 30 meters wide, its entrance formed by a two-meter square opening in a rock wall. The cavernous interior, known as ...
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Royal Museum, the Court (i.e. Bargello Museum, the Courtyard), Florence, Italy
This photochrome print of the court of the Royal Museum in Florence is part of “Views of Architecture and Other Sites in Italy” from the catalog of the Detroit Publishing Company (1905). Construction of the building, which was intended to be a palace, began in 1255, based on a design by the architect Lapo Tedesco (died circa 1280). From the late 13th century to the early 16th century, the building was known as the Palazzo del Popolo (Palace of the People), and was home to the podestà, or the city ...
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Church of the Annunciation, Interior, Genoa, Italy
This photochrome print of the nave of the Church of the Annunciation (Chiesa dell’Annunciazione) in Genoa is part of “Views of Architecture and Other Sites in Italy” from the catalog of the Detroit Publishing Company (1905). The Church of the Annunciation, or the Basilica della Santissima Annunziata del Vastato, is widely considered the most beautiful church in Genoa. Construction was begun by Franciscan monks in 1520. In 1591, a prominent Genoese family, the Lomellinis, undertook an expansion and renovation of the church. The family commissioned the Italian painter Giovanni ...
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Piazza of the Cathedral, Milan, Italy
This photochrome print of the cathedral square (Piazza del Duomo) in Milan is part of “Views of Architecture and Other Sites in Italy” from the catalog of the Detroit Publishing Company (1905). The Duomo di Milano (Cathedral of Milan) is one of the largest Christian churches in the world. Construction of the cathedral began in 1386 on the site of two older basilicas under the patronage of the prominent Visconti family. The cathedral took nearly five hundred years to complete. Nicolas de Bonaventure (active circa 1390), Jean Mignot (active circa ...
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The Arch of Peace, Milan, Italy
This photochrome print of the Arch of Peace (Arco della Pace) in Milan is part of “Views of Architecture and Other Sites in Italy” from the catalog of the Detroit Publishing Company (1905). This 23-meter marble structure stands in the Piazza Sempione, at one end of the Simplon Road, the strategic route through the Alps taken by Napoleon I when he invaded northern Italy in 1800. Napoleon later commissioned the arch to commemorate his victories. Construction began in 1806 under the direction of the architect Luigi Cagnola (1762–1833), but ...
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The Leaning Tower, Pisa, Italy
This photochrome print of the Leaning Tower in Pisa is part of “Views of Architecture and Other Sites in Italy” from the catalog of the Detroit Publishing Company (1905). Also known as Il Campanile, the marble and granite structure was built to serve as the bell tower (campanile) of the Cathedral of Pisa. Construction began in 1174 according to a design by the architect Bonnanno Pisano, but was interrupted numerous times. The tower was not completed until 1350, nearly two hundred years later. Fifty-seven meters high, the tower is built ...
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Vesta's Temple, Rome, Italy
This photochrome print of the Temple of Vesta in Rome is part of “Views of Architecture and Other Sites in Italy” from the catalog of the Detroit Publishing Company (1905). The temple is dedicated to Vesta (in Greek, Hestia), the goddess of the hearth. Located on the eastern side of the Roman Forum, the temple originally was built in circa the third century BC with reeds and a straw roof, the style of many Latin dwellings of the period. Because of its susceptibility to fire, the temple was rebuilt around ...
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Interior of Coliseum, Rome, Italy
This photochrome print of the inside of the Coliseum is part of “Views of Architecture and Other Sites in Italy” from the catalog of the Detroit Publishing Company (1905). In 64–68 AD the Emperor Nero built an extravagant palace in the center of Rome. After he died, his successor, Vespasian (Titus Flavius Vespasianus), had an amphitheater built on the site of the lake within Nero's palace. Construction began around 70 AD and was completed circa 82 AD under Vespasian's son Titus. The structure consists of three levels ...
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Exterior of the Coliseum, Rome, Italy
This photochrome print of the Coliseum is from the “Views of architecture and other sites in Italy” section from the catalog of the Detroit Publishing Company (1905). In 64–68 AD the Emperor Nero built an extravagant palace in the center of Rome. After he died, his successor, Vespasian (Titus Flavius Vespasianus) had an amphitheater built on the site of the lake within Nero's palace. Construction began around 70 AD and was completed circa 82 AD under Vespasian's son Titus. The structure consists of three levels of arcades ...
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The Vatican I, Rome, Italy
This photochrome print of Vatican City is part of “Views of Architecture and Other Sites in Italy” from the catalog of the Detroit Publishing Company (1905). Shown is Saint Peter’s Square (Piazza di San Pietro), which adjoins Saint Peter’s Basilica, one of the world’s largest Christian churches. The church and square are named for the Apostle Peter, the first Bishop of Rome and the first pope. Saint Peter is buried beneath the altar of the basilica. The square, designed by Gian Lorenzo Bernini (1598–1680), features two ...
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View of the Forum, Rome, Italy
This photochrome print of the Roman Forum is part of “Views of Architecture and Other Sites in Italy” from the catalog of the Detroit Publishing Company (1905). Located between Palatine Hill and Capitoline Hill, the Forum was the nexus of political, business, and social life in ancient Rome. It contained a marketplace, temples, a senate house, and law courts. Visible on the left, on the west end of the Forum, are the massive ruins of the Temple of Saturn, the oldest temple in the Forum, dedicated to the Roman god ...
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Fountain of Trevi, Rome, Italy
This photochrome print of the Trevi Fountain (Fontana di Trevi) is part of “Views of Architecture and Other Sites in Italy” from the catalog of the Detroit Publishing Company (1905). The fountain, 26 meters long by 20 meters wide, stands against the south side of the Palazzo Poli, a Baroque palace that was altered by Luigi Vanvitelli (1700–73) to accommodate the fountain and serve as its backdrop. The fountain dates back to ancient Rome, when this location was the terminal point for the Aqua Virgo aqueduct, which was commissioned ...
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Castle and Mediaeval Market Town, Turin, Italy
This photochrome print of a medieval castle and market town is part of “Views of Architecture and Other Sites in Italy” from the catalog of the Detroit Publishing Company (1905). Situated along the Po River in the Piedmont region of northern Italy, Turin was the site of the 1884 Esposizione Generale Italiana Artistica e Industriale (Italian General Art and Industrial Exhibition). The exhibition featured a medieval castle, the Castello Mediaevale, and the medieval marketplace, Borgo Mediaevale, which were intended to convey to visitors an impression of life in the Middle ...
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The Bridge of Sighs, Venice, Italy
This photochrome print of the Bridge of Sighs (Ponte dei Sospiri) in Venice is part of “Views of Architecture and Other Sites in Italy” from the catalog of the Detroit Publishing Company (1905). Made of white limestone and containing two stone-barred windows, the 11-meter-wide bridge was built in 1595–1600 by Antonio Contino (1566–1600). Greatly admired for its decorative Italian Renaissance architecture, the bridge connects the interrogation rooms and prison in the Palazzo Ducale with a newer prison, the Palazzo delle Prigioni, located across the Rio di Palazzo. The ...
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Feeding Pigeons in St. Mark's Place, Venice, Italy
This photochrome print of Saint Mark’s Square (Piazza San Marco) in Venice is part of “Views of Architecture and Other Sites in Italy” from the catalog of the Detroit Publishing Company (1905). The square, or piazza, is framed by the Saint Mark’s Basilica, the marble Doge's Palace, the Procuratie, and the library of Saint Mark's. The basilica, shown here, was originally built in 832, shortly after the remains of Saint Mark the Evangelist, the patron saint of Venice, were said to have been brought to the ...
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Concert in St. Mark's Place, Venice, Italy
This photochrome print of Saint Mark’s Square (Piazza San Marco) in Venice is part of “Views of Architecture and Other Sites in Italy” from the catalog of the Detroit Publishing Company (1905). The basilica, shown here, was originally built in 832, shortly after the remains of Saint Mark the Evangelist, the patron saint of Venice, were said to have been brought to the city from Alexandria, Egypt by two Venetian merchants. The church was destroyed in a fire, rebuilt at the end of the 10th century, and again in ...
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Interior of St. Mark's, Venice, Italy
This photochrome print of the nave of Saint Mark’s Basilica in Venice is part of “Views of Architecture and Other Sites in Italy” from the catalog of the Detroit Publishing Company (1905). The interior of Saint Mark's is a breathtaking architectural and artistic marvel that features Renaissance paneling, more than 8000 square meters of marble, gilded mosaics on the walls and ceilings depicting legends of the apostles, Byzantine reliefs from the 10th–12th centuries depicting the Virgin Mary, scenes from the Passion of Christ, and images of Saint ...
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The Grand Canal, View I, Venice, Italy
This photochrome print of the Grand Canal in Venice is part of “Views of Architecture and Other Sites in Italy” from the catalog of the Detroit Publishing Company (1905). The Grand Canal, or the Canalazzo, is a 3.8-kilometer long waterway that flows from northwest to southeast Venice. The 1903 edition of Baedeker's Italy: Handbook for Travellers called it "the main artery of the traffic of Venice." "Handsome houses and magnificent palaces rise on the banks, for this is the street of the Nobili, the ancient aristocracy of Venice ...
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Pitti Palace, Royal Residence, Florence, Italy
This photochrome print of the Palazzo Pitti in Florence is part of “Views of Architecture and Other Sites in Italy” from the catalog of the Detroit Publishing Company (1905). Situated on the south side of the Arno River, the palace was designed by the Renaissance architect Filippo Brunelleschi (1377–1466) around 1458, for Luca Pitti (1398-1472), a friend and servant of the Medici family. The palace was still unfinished when Pitti died. In 1550, nearly 80 years after Pitti's death, Eleonora de Toledo, the wife of Grand Duke Cosimo ...
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Via Roma, Naples, Italy
This photochrome print of the Via Roma in Naples is part of “Views of Architecture and Other Sites in Italy” from the catalog of the Detroit Publishing Company (1905). Stretching more than two kilometers from south to north, the Via Roma is one of the city's main thoroughfares. According to the 1909 edition of Baedeker's Italy from the Alps to Naples: Handbook for Travellers, "the noisy out-of-door life of the Neapolitans is picturesque and entertaining. . . . From morning to night the streets resound with the rattle or vehicles, the ...
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