17 results
La Grande Place, the Old Houses, Brussels, Belgium
This photochrome print of the Grande Place in Brussels is part of “Views of Architecture and Other Sites in Belgium” from the catalog of the Detroit Publishing Company (1905). This square is the traditional center of Brussels, the location of city hall and the city’s market place. Its present appearance has not changed since around 1695, when the French army under Louis XIV destroyed its older structures, which had been built in the Middle Ages. The houses shown here reflect a Gothic–Baroque style of architecture, popular in the ...
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St. Hubert's Gallery, Brussels, Belgium
This photochrome print of the Royal Galleries St. Hubert in Brussels is part of “Views of Architecture and Other Sites in Belgium” from the catalog of the Detroit Publishing Company (1905). Located at the city center, this shopping arcade was designed by the architect Jean-Pierre Cluysenaar (1811–80) and opened in 1847 under the reign of King Leopold I to celebrate Belgium's independence in 1830. The arcade consists of two main sections, the King's Gallery and the Queen's Gallery, which are separated by a colonnade. With its ...
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St. Bavon Abbey, the Cloister, Ghent, Belgium
This photochrome print of the cloister in the St. Bavon Abbey is part of “Views of Architecture and Other Sites in Belgium” from the catalog of the Detroit Publishing Company (1905). According to Baedeker’s Belgium and Holland including the Grand-Duchy of Luxembourg (1905), “the abbey, traditionally said to have been founded about 630 by St. Amandus and restored in 651 by St. Bavon (d. 654), was one of those bestowed upon Eginhard, the biographer of Charlemagne, and after its destruction by the Northmen (851) was restored with great splendour ...
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Ghent Gate, Bruges, Belgium
This photochrome print of the Ghent gate in Bruges is part of “Views of Architecture and Other Sites in Belgium” from the catalog of the Detroit Publishing Company (1905). The gate, otherwise known as Gentpoort or Porte de Gand, is one of only four remaining medieval gates in Bruges. It was designed by the Flemish architect Jan van Oudenaarde (died 1412) and initially served as a fortification and as a point of exchange for merchants. Bruges was one of Europe’s major commercial centers from the 12th to the 15th ...
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Entrance to Port, Ostend, Belgium
This photochrome print of the port in Ostend is part of “Views of Architecture and Other Sites in Belgium” from the catalog of the Detroit Publishing Company (1905). Located in West Flanders on the coast of the North Sea, Ostend is one of Belgium’s main port cities. Baedeker’s Belgium and Holland including the Grand-Duchy of Luxembourg (1905) called Ostend “the second seaport and the most fashionable sea-bathing resort of Belgium.” Visible to the right is the Western Pier, which was built in 1837 to accommodate the city’s ...
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The Calvary, St. Paul's Church, Antwerp, Belgium
This photochrome print of St. Paul’s Church in Antwerp is part of “Views of Architecture and Other Sites in Belgium” from the catalog of the Detroit Publishing Company (1905). The Church of Saint Paul was built in 1540–71 on the site of a former 13th-century church that had been continually threatened by flooding. The Gothic-style church is known for its numerous sculptures, many of which are featured in the depiction of Calvary, the site where Jesus was crucified, on one side of the church. This composition, which consists ...
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Brabo Monument, Antwerp, Belgium
This photochrome print of the Brabo Monument in Antwerp is part of “Views of Architecture and Other Sites in Belgium” from the catalog of the Detroit Publishing Company (1905). Dedicated to the legendary hero Salvius Brabo, the monument was designed by Jef Lambeaux (1852–1908) and is located on the Grand Place in Antwerp. As described in Baedeker’s Belgium and Holland including the Grand-Duchy of Luxembourg (1905), Brabo was “a mythical hero who defeated and cut off the hand of the giant Antigonus. The giant used to exact a ...
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The Beach and the Sea, Blankenberghe, Belgium
This photochrome print of the beach and sea in Blankenberghe, Belgium, is part of “Views of Architecture and Other Sites in Belgium” from the catalog of the Detroit Publishing Company (1905). Blankenberghe was known in the late 19th century as a seaside resort. Baedeker’s Belgium and Holland including the Grand-Duchy of Luxembourg (1905) noted: “As a sea-bathing resort, Blankenberghe has become a rival of Ostend, being visited by 35,000 persons annually, half of whom are Germans.” The wheeled beach cabins lining the shore were an innovation adopted from ...
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Maison du Franc, Bruges, Belgium
This photochrome print of the Maison du Franc in Bruges is part of “Views of Architecture and Other Sites in Belgium” from the catalog of the Detroit Publishing Company (1905). The Maison du Franc, also known as Landhuis van het Brugse Vrije (Palace of the Liberty of Bruges) was built in the 1720s, on the basis of the designs of the architect Jan van der Cruycen, and stands at the center of Bruges on the site of an older, 16th-century building. The structure, whose architecture reflects classical and baroque elements ...
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The Library, Bruges, Belgium
This photochrome print of the municipal library in Bruges is part of “Views of Architecture and Other Sites in Belgium” from the catalog of the Detroit Publishing Company (1905). The library, which houses the municipal archives of Bruges, was restored by the Belgian architect Louis de la Censerie (1838–1909) in 1877–81. Its neo-Renaissance architecture, which recalls a 17th-century aesthetic, is reflected in the use of the stepped-gable façades on the roof. According to Baedeker’s Belgium and Holland including the Grand-Duchy of Luxembourg (1905), “the Municipal Library, which ...
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St. Croix Gate, Bruges, Belgium
This photochrome print of the St. Croix gate in Bruges is part of “Views of Architecture and Other Sites in Belgium” from the catalog of the Detroit Publishing Company (1905). The St. Croix Gate, or Kruispoort, was originally built in 1366–68 and then rebuilt around 1402 by the Flemish architect Jan van Oudenaarde (died 1412), who is also credited with the Ghent Gate (Gentpoort). The gate, which was constructed with white sand–lime bricks, formed a section of Bruges’s defense wall and was the main entrance to the ...
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Quai Vert, Bruges, Belgium
This photochrome print of the Quai Vert (Green quay) in Bruges is part of “Views of Architecture and Other Sites in Belgium” from the catalog of the Detroit Publishing Company (1905). The Quai Vert is a picturesque waterway that flows through Bruges, alongside some of the city’s best-known buildings, including the Maison du Franc (Palace of the Liberty of Bruges). In his Land and People of the World, the British writer and explorer Sir Harry Hamilton Johnston (1858–1927) observed: "The Green Quay is well-named. It is a paradise ...
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Palace of the Nation, Brussels, Belgium
This photochrome print of the Palace of the Nation in Brussels is part of “Views of Architecture and Other Sites in Belgium” from the catalog of the Detroit Publishing Company (1905). The Paleis der Natie, or Palais de la Nation, is a neoclassical building that faces the Royal Palace, or Palais Royal, and that has served as the seat of the Belgian parliament since the country’s independence in 1830. The building was constructed in 1779–83 for the assemblies of the old Council of Brabant, according to a design ...
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Brouckere Place and Anspach Monument, Brussels, Belgium
This photochrome print of Brouckère Place and the Anspach Monument in Brussels is part of “Views of Architecture and Other Sites in Belgium” from the catalog of the Detroit Publishing Company (1905). The monument was erected in 1897 to honor Jules Victor Anspach (1829–79), a former mayor of Brussels who championed urban development to benefit the city’s working class, and who was one of the chief promoters of Brussels’s boulevards. The monument features a large fountain designed by Emile Janlet (1839–1919), with sculptures by Paul de ...
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Waterloo, the Tombs, Belgium
This photochrome print of the tombs at Waterloo is part of “Views of Architecture and Other Sites in Belgium” from the catalog of the Detroit Publishing Company (1905). Located approximately 12 kilometers south-southeast of Brussels, Waterloo is the site of the great battle of June 1815 between the French army of Napoleon I and the armies led by the Duke of Wellington of England and General Blücher of Prussia. On February 26, 1815, Napoleon secretly left the Mediterranean island of Elba, where he had been exiled by the victorious allies ...
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The Kursaal, (i.e., Cursaal), Ostend, Belgium
This photochrome print of the Kursaal in Ostend is part of “Views of Architecture and Other Sites in Belgium” from the catalog of the Detroit Publishing Company (1905). Built in 1875 alongside the Albert I promenade that overlooks the North Sea, this concert hall was one of the main attractions of the seaside resort of Ostend. Baedeker’s Belgium and Holland including the Grand-Duchy of Luxembourg (1905) described the hall as the “principal resort of visitors during the bathing-season . . . open to subscribers only. The day ticket . . . admits to the restaurant ...
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Chateau des Comtes, Namur, Belgium
This photochrome print of the Château des Comtes in Namur is part of “Views of Architecture and Other Sites in Belgium” from the catalog of the Detroit Publishing Company (1905). Located in central Belgium, about 65 kilometers from Brussels, the town of Namur is known for its military history and its key role in Belgium’s defense. The town was founded on a rocky spur, at the confluence of the Sambre and the Meuse rivers. A main feature of the town is its stone citadel, which was built by the ...
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