4 results in English
Vienna 1, Parliament
Rudolf von Alt (1812–1905) was an Austrian painter, draughtsman, and printmaker known for his city scenes, landscapes, and interiors. Shown here is Alt’s ink drawing with white heightening of the parliament building in Vienna, signed and dated 1885 in the lower right-hand corner. Located in the Innere Stadt (Inner City), or the first district of Vienna (“Vienna 1”), the neoclassical structure was built in 1874–83 by Danish architect Baron Theophil Edvard von Hansen (1813–91). It served as the meeting place of the two chambers of the ...
Contributed by Austrian National Library
Hutsul Wedding
This pen-and-ink drawing of a late-19th-century Hutsul wedding is by Thaddäus Rybkowski (1848–1926), a Polish artist whose work featured scenes of rural life in Galicia and Poland. Born in Russian Poland, Rybkowski was educated at the Krakow School of Art. He later came to Vienna, where he studied in the studio of Professor Leopold Löffler-Radymno. The Hutsuls are a seminomadic ethno-cultural group that for centuries has inhabited the region of the Carpathian Mountains. The Hutsul language is considered to be a dialect of Ukrainian, strongly influenced by Polish and ...
Contributed by Austrian National Library
View of Sarajevo
Gyula (Julius) Háry (1864–1946) was a Hungarian painter and graphic artist, best known for his detailed watercolors of picturesque scenes in Austria-Hungary and Italy. He was born in Zalaegerszeg, in western Hungary, and studied art at the Budapest School for Applied Arts. Háry first went to Sarajevo, the capital and largest city of Bosnia and Herzegovina, in 1884, six years after control of the province was transferred from the Ottoman Empire to Austria-Hungary under the terms of the 1878 Treaty of Berlin. He made several return visits to Sarajevo ...
Contributed by Austrian National Library
A Ruthenian Lyrist
This signed oil sketch by the illustrator and painter Sigismund Ajdukiewicz (1861–1917) depicts a scene from Ruthenia, a region located south of the Carpathian Mountains in present-day Ukraine, which was part of the Austro-Hungarian Empire and ruled by Hungary until 1918. Ajdukiewicz, also known by his Polish name Zygmunt Ajdukiewicz and by its Austrian variant, Sigismund von Ajdukiewicz, was born in Witkowice (present-day Poland). As a young man he studied art at the Vienna Academy and in Munich. From 1885 until the end of his life, he lived and ...
Contributed by Austrian National Library