16 results
Vitebsk. Part of the City with the Western Dvina
At the beginning of the 20th century, the Russian photographer Sergei Mikhailovich Prokudin-Gorskii (1863–1944) used a special color photography process to create a visual record of the Russian Empire. Some of Prokudin-Gorskii’s photographs date from about 1905, but the bulk of his work is from between 1909 and 1915, when, with the support of Tsar Nicholas II and the Ministry of Transportation, he undertook extended trips through many different parts of the empire.
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Library of Congress
Dvinsk. General View of the Embankment of the Western Dvina River
The town of Dvinsk, located on the Western Dvina River, was founded by the Livonian Order in 1275 as the Dünaburg castle. As a result of the 1772 partition of Poland, the town was absorbed into the Russian Empire and became an important garrison defending the southwestern approaches to Saint Petersburg. In early July 1812 a secondary French force approached the town but was defeated. In 1893 Alexander III renamed the town Dvinsk, and by the time of this photograph it had become a regional industrial center by virtue of ...
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Library of Congress
Railroad Bridge across the Western Dvina River Near Dvinsk
At the beginning of the 20th century, the Russian photographer Sergei Mikhailovich Prokudin-Gorskii (1863–1944) used a special color photography process to create a visual record of the Russian Empire. Some of Prokudin-Gorskii’s photographs date from about 1905, but the bulk of his work is from between 1909 and 1915, when, with the support of Tsar Nicholas II and the Ministry of Transportation, he undertook extended trips through many different parts of the empire.
Contributed by
Library of Congress
Western Dvina near the City of Drissa
At the beginning of the 20th century, the Russian photographer Sergei Mikhailovich Prokudin-Gorskii (1863–1944) used a special color photography process to create a visual record of the Russian Empire. Some of Prokudin-Gorskii’s photographs date from about 1905, but the bulk of his work is from between 1909 and 1915, when, with the support of Tsar Nicholas II and the Ministry of Transportation, he undertook extended trips through many different parts of the empire.
Contributed by
Library of Congress
Site of the Source of the Western Dvina near the Village of Kariakino Three Versts from Lake Peno in Tver Province, Ostashkov District. Volga River Region
At the beginning of the 20th century, the Russian photographer Sergei Mikhailovich Prokudin-Gorskii (1863–1944) used a special color photography process to create a visual record of the Russian Empire. Some of Prokudin-Gorskii’s photographs date from about 1905, but the bulk of his work is from between 1909 and 1915, when, with the support of Tsar Nicholas II and the Ministry of Transportation, he undertook extended trips through many different parts of the empire.
Contributed by
Library of Congress
The Ķegums Hydro Power Plant and the Temporary Bridge over the Daugava, November 1936
Eduards Kraucs (1898–1977) was a renowned Latvian photographer and cinematographer who, between 1936 and 1940, documented the construction of the Ķegums Hydro Power Plant on the Daugava River in central Latvia. This photograph, taken in November 1936, shows the temporary wooden bridge over the river and workers building the concrete supports for a new bridge. The historic buildings along the right bank of the river, before the reservoir was created, can be seen in the background. The plant was a unique engineering structure for the Baltic countries and Northern ...
Contributed by
Latvenergo AS Power Industry Museum
The Temporary Dam for the Ķegums Hydro Power Plant, December 10, 1936
Eduards Kraucs (1898–1977) was a renowned Latvian photographer and cinematographer who, between 1936 and 1940, documented the construction of the Ķegums Hydro Power Plant on the Daugava River in central Latvia. This photograph, taken on December 10, 1936, depicts the construction of a temporary dam on the right bank of the river. The plant was a unique engineering structure for the Baltic countries and Northern Europe, involving a collaborative effort of Latvian and Swedish engineers. Technological solutions new to Europe were used in its construction. The plant had great ...
Contributed by
Latvenergo AS Power Industry Museum
View of the Ķegums Hydro Power Plant Construction Site, August 19, 1937
Eduards Kraucs (1898–1977) was a renowned Latvian photographer and cinematographer who, between 1936 and 1940, documented the construction of the Ķegums Hydro Power Plant on the Daugava River in central Latvia. This photograph, taken on August 19, 1937, shows the construction site with the new metal bridge over the river in the foreground; part of its architectonic shape was preserved until September 1986. Housing for engineers and workers can be seen in the background, on the right bank. The plant was a unique engineering structure for the Baltic countries ...
Contributed by
Latvenergo AS Power Industry Museum
Construction of the Daugava Bridge and the Ķegums Hydro Power Plant, October 28, 1937
Eduards Kraucs (1898–1977) was a renowned Latvian photographer and cinematographer who, between 1936 and 1940, documented the construction of the Ķegums Hydro Power Plant on the Daugava River in central Latvia. This photograph, taken on October 28, 1937, shows the construction of the metal frame and permanent supports for the bridge over the river. The plant was a unique engineering structure for the Baltic countries and Northern Europe, involving a collaborative effort of Latvian and Swedish engineers. Technological solutions new to Europe were used in its construction. The plant ...
Contributed by
Latvenergo AS Power Industry Museum
Construction of the Ice-breaking Wall at the Ķegums Hydro Power Plant, May 20, 1938
Eduards Kraucs (1898–1977) was a renowned Latvian photographer and cinematographer who, between 1936 and 1940, documented the construction of the Ķegums Hydro Power Plant on the Daugava River in central Latvia. This photograph, taken on May 20, 1938, shows the blocks for concreting the ice-breaking wall at the plant. The plant was a unique engineering structure for the Baltic countries and Northern Europe, involving a collaborative effort of Latvian and Swedish engineers. Technological solutions new to Europe were used in its construction. The plant had great importance in Latvia ...
Contributed by
Latvenergo AS Power Industry Museum
Construction at the Ķegums Hydro Power Plant Dam, September 16, 1938
Eduards Kraucs (1898–1977) was a renowned Latvian photographer and cinematographer who, between 1936 and 1940, documented the construction of the Ķegums Hydro Power Plant on the Daugava River in central Latvia. This photograph, taken on September 16, 1938, shows the blocks for concreting the supports of the new metal bridge over the river and ice cutters at the power plant dam. The perspective makes clear the massive scale of the project. The plant was a unique engineering structure for the Baltic countries and Northern Europe, involving a collaborative effort ...
Contributed by
Latvenergo AS Power Industry Museum
Flooding at the Ķegums Hydro Power Plant Dam, February 10, 1939
Eduards Kraucs (1898–1977) was a renowned Latvian photographer and cinematographer who, between 1936 and 1940, documented the construction of the Ķegums Hydro Power Plant on the Daugava River in central Latvia. This photograph, taken on February 10, 1939, shows ice buildup during flooding of the river at the construction site. The plant was a unique engineering structure for the Baltic countries and Northern Europe, involving a collaborative effort of Latvian and Swedish engineers. Technological solutions new to Europe were used in its construction. The plant had great importance in ...
Contributed by
Latvenergo AS Power Industry Museum
Building the Ķegums Hydro Power Plant Dam, February 24, 1939
Eduards Kraucs (1898–1977) was a renowned Latvian photographer and cinematographer who, between 1936 and 1940, documented the construction of the Ķegums Hydro Power Plant on the Daugava River in central Latvia. This photograph, taken on February 24, 1939, shows the building of the power plant dam. The plant was a unique engineering structure for the Baltic countries and Northern Europe, involving a collaborative effort of Latvian and Swedish engineers. Technological solutions new to Europe were used in its construction. The plant had great importance in Latvia as a symbol ...
Contributed by
Latvenergo AS Power Industry Museum
View of the Ķegums Hydro Power Plant and Floodgates, April 20, 1939
Eduards Kraucs (1898–1977) was a renowned Latvian photographer and cinematographer who, between 1936 and 1940, documented the construction of the Ķegums Hydro Power Plant on the Daugava River in central Latvia. This photograph, taken on April 20, 1939, shows the dam and floodgates from the reservoir side at the power plant. The plant was a unique engineering structure for the Baltic countries and Northern Europe, involving a collaborative effort of Latvian and Swedish engineers. Technological solutions new to Europe were used in its construction. The plant had great importance ...
Contributed by
Latvenergo AS Power Industry Museum
Reinforcing the Daugava River Dam at the Ķegums Hydro Power Plant, June 15, 1939
Eduards Kraucs (1898–1977) was a renowned Latvian photographer and cinematographer who, between 1936 and 1940, documented the construction of the Ķegums Hydro Power Plant on the Daugava River in central Latvia. This photograph, taken on June 15, 1939, shows the reinforcement of the earth dam slopes on the right bank of the river. Construction of the power plant building and ice-breaking wall can be seen in the background. The plant was a unique engineering structure for the Baltic countries and Northern Europe, involving a collaborative effort of Latvian and ...
Contributed by
Latvenergo AS Power Industry Museum
Bridging the Daugava River at the Ķegums Hydro Power Plant, October 1936
Eduards Kraucs (1898–1977) was a renowned Latvian photographer and cinematographer who, between 1936 and 1940, documented the construction of the Ķegums Hydro Power Plant on the Daugava River in central Latvia. This photograph, taken in October 1936, shows the construction of the first temporary wooden bridge across the river. The plant was a unique engineering structure for the Baltic countries and Northern Europe, involving a collaborative effort of Latvian and Swedish engineers. Technological solutions new to Europe were used in its construction. The plant had great importance in Latvia ...
Contributed by
Latvenergo AS Power Industry Museum