4 results in English
Cartridge Factory on Avenue Rapp after the Explosion
The Franco-Prussian War was brought about by rising tensions between France and Prussia in the 1860s. France, under Emperor Napoleon III, was determined to check the growth of Prussian power and avenge what it saw as a series of diplomatic humiliations. Prussia, under Chancellor Otto von Bismarck, believed that a Prussian-led war of the German states against France would be a decisive act leading to creation of a unified German empire. The conflict began on July 19, 1870, when France declared war. The French army proved woefully unprepared and suffered ...
Cartridge Factory on Avenue Rapp after the Explosion
The Franco-Prussian War was brought about by rising tensions between France and Prussia in the 1860s. France, under Emperor Napoleon III, was determined to check the growth of Prussian power and avenge what it saw as a series of diplomatic humiliations. Prussia, under Chancellor Otto von Bismarck, believed that a Prussian-led war of the German states against France would be a decisive act leading to creation of a unified German empire. The conflict began on July 19, 1870, when France declared war. The French army proved woefully unprepared and suffered ...
Rapp Cartridge Factory After the Explosion: Avenue Rapp
The Franco-Prussian War was brought about by rising tensions between France and Prussia in the 1860s. France, under Emperor Napoleon III, was determined to check the growth of Prussian power and avenge what it saw as a series of diplomatic humiliations. Prussia, under Chancellor Otto von Bismarck, believed that a Prussian-led war of the German states against France would be a decisive act leading to creation of a unified German empire. The conflict began on July 19, 1870, when France declared war. The French army proved woefully unprepared and suffered ...
The War of Munitions. How Great Britain Has Mobilised Her Industries
This 1917 poster, showing 14 vignettes of the British armaments industry and armed forces, provides detailed information about the mobilization of national human and industrial resources by Great Britain during World War I. It notes that there “are 2 ½ million persons engaged on Government work in Munition trades, of whom nearly half a million are women.” Figures are given regarding huge increases in the production of bombs, machine guns, ammunition, and heavy guns, and in the number of national arsenals. The poster also provides information about the growth and ...
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