28 results in English
Syr Darya Oblast. City of Tashkent. Views from the Garden Located at the Home of the Regional Chief Official
This photograph is from the ethnographical part of Turkestan Album, a comprehensive visual survey of Central Asia undertaken after imperial Russia assumed control of the region in the 1860s. Commissioned by General Konstantin Petrovich von Kaufman (1818–82), the first governor-general of Russian Turkestan, the album is in four parts spanning six volumes: “Archaeological Part” (two volumes); “Ethnographic Part” (two volumes); “Trades Part” (one volume); and “Historical Part” (one volume). The principal compiler was Russian Orientalist Aleksandr L. Kun, who was assisted by Nikolai V. Bogaevskii. The album contains some ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Zeravshan Okrug. Waterfall in the Village of Pandzhshambe Siab
This photograph is from the ethnographical part of Turkestan Album, a comprehensive visual survey of Central Asia undertaken after imperial Russia assumed control of the region in the 1860s. Commissioned by General Konstantin Petrovich von Kaufman (1818–82), the first governor-general of Russian Turkestan, the album is in four parts spanning six volumes: “Archaeological Part” (two volumes); “Ethnographic Part” (two volumes); “Trades Part” (one volume); and “Historical Part” (one volume). The principal compiler was Russian Orientalist Aleksandr L. Kun, who was assisted by Nikolai V. Bogaevskii. The album contains some ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Itamaraty Waterfall
The Thereza Christina Maria collection is composed of 21,742 photos assembled by Emperor Pedro II (1825-91) throughout his life and donated by him to the National Library of Brazil. The collection covers a wide variety of subjects. It documents the achievements of Brazil and Brazilians in the 19th century and also includes many photographs of Europe, Africa, and North America. This photograph shows the Cascata do Itamaraty (Itamaraty Waterfall) on the Piabanha River near Petrópolis. The waterfall still exists, but is known today as the Cascata de Bulhões. Most ...
Cascatinha do Retiro
This photograph is from Vistas de Petrópolis (Views of Petrópolis), an album created in the 1860s by Pedro Hees (1841–80), one of Brazil’s most important early photographers. Petrópolis was founded by government decree on March 16, 1843, and named after Emperor Pedro II (1825–91, reigned 1831–89). The decree provided for the construction of the Imperial Palace and its dependencies and gardens, which formed the Quinta Imperial de Petrópolis (Imperial farm of Petrópolis). Called the Imperial City for its associations with the royal family, Petrópolis served as ...
The Uganda Journal, Volume I, Number 1, January 1934
The Uganda Literary and Scientific Society was established at Entebbe, Uganda Protectorate, in 1923. Its main activity consisted of the reading of papers and the delivery of lectures on topics relating to Uganda. In 1933 the society moved its headquarters to Kampala and decided to issue a regular publication, The Uganda Journal. The journal’s declared aim was “to collect and publish information which may add to our knowledge of Uganda and to record that which in the course of time might be lost.” Four issues per year were published ...
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Ovrelerfos, Trondhjem, Norway
This photochrome print from the “Landscape and Marine Views of Norway” section in the catalog of the Detroit Publishing Company shows a noted tourist destination in Norway as it would have appeared in the last decade of the 19th century. The Lille (Lower) Lerfos and Store (Upper) Lerfos are picturesque waterfalls on the Nid River, several kilometers south of the city of Trondheim. The 1892 edition of Baedeker’s Norway, Sweden and Denmark: Handbook for Travellers advised that the best view of the falls “is from one of the windows ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Jajce, Bosnia, Austro-Hungary
This photochrome print is from “Views of the Austro-Hungarian Empire,” a selection of photographs of late-19th century tourist sites in Eastern and Central Europe (formerly the Austro-Hungarian Empire) in the catalog of the Detroit Publishing Company. It depicts the town of Jajce, which, according to Baedeker’s Austria, Including Hungary, Transylvania, Dalmatia, and Bosnia (1900), is “an old town picturesquely situated on the left bank of the Vrbas, on the slope of Gola Planina.” Shown here is the “superb Waterfall of the Pliva, which is precipitated from the Lake of ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
General View of Niagara Falls from Bridge
This Detroit Publishing Company photographic print from around 1901 shows Niagara Falls, the spectacular natural wonder on the Niagara River, which forms part of the border between Canada and the United States. The photograph is a cyanotype, a process that was invented in 1842 by the British astronomer and photography pioneer Sir John Herschel (1792-1871) and came into widespread use in the 1880s. Herschel discovered that water-soluble iron salts, when exposed to sunlight, form the compound known as Prussian Blue (a complex molecule that contains the compound cyanide, hence the ...
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Detail of the Kivach Waterfall. Suna River
Recent research indicates that this photograph shows the Pog-Porog Waterfall on the Suna River, located in the Kondopoga region of Karelia (the original caption is incorrect). The several-second exposures required by the photographer’s equipment render the turbulent water as a white mass. On the far bank is a dense forest of fir, birch, and pine. A simple log cabin stands at the edge of a path from the forest, while the roof of another cabin is visible on the left. The jagged boulders of the rapids have trapped a ...
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Kivach Waterfall. Suna River
The Murmansk Railroad was built by the Russian government during World War I to connect Petrograd (Saint Petersburg) to the ice-free port of Romanov-on-Murman (now Murmansk). Construction lasted from 1914 to the spring of 1917 when the line was completed. Seen here along the route is Kivach Waterfall on the Suna River in the Kondopoga district of Karelia. Because of the multiple exposures required by the photographer’process, the water appears as a boiling white mass. Obscured on the right by a grove of birch and pine is a wooden ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Kivach Waterfall. Suna River
The Murmansk Railroad was built by the Russian government during World War I to connect Petrograd (Saint Petersburg) to the ice-free port of Romanov-on-Murman (now Murmansk). Construction lasted from 1914 to the spring of 1917 when the line was completed. Seen here along the route is Kivach Waterfall on the Suna River in the Kondopoga district of Karelia. Because of the multiple exposures required by the photographer’s process, the water appears as a boiling white mass. Visible on the right is a wooden dacha (resort building) set within a ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Pavilion near the Kivach Waterfall. Suna River
This photograph shows the Kivach Waterfall on the Suna River, located in the Kondopoga region of Karelia. On the bank above the waterfall is a wooden gazebo set against a background of birch, fir, and other conifers. The image is by Russian photographer Sergei Mikhailovich Prokudin-Gorskii (1863–1944), who used a special color photography process to create a visual record of the Russian Empire in the early 20th century. Some of Prokudin-Gorskii’s photographs date from about 1905, but the bulk of his work is from between 1909 and 1915 ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Pavilion near the Kivach Waterfall. Suna River
This photograph shows the Kivach Waterfall on the Suna River, located in the Kondopoga region of Karelia. On the bank above the waterfall is a wooden gazebo set against a background of birch, fir, and other conifers. The image is by Russian photographer Sergei Mikhailovich Prokudin-Gorskii (1863–1944), who used a special color photography process to create a visual record of the Russian Empire in the early 20th century. Some of Prokudin-Gorskii’s photographs date from about 1905, but the bulk of his work is from between 1909 and 1915 ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Side View of the Kivach Waterfall. Suna River
The Murmansk Railroad was built by the Russian government during World War I to connect Petrograd (Saint Petersburg) to the ice-free port of Romanov-on-Murman (now Murmansk). Construction lasted from 1914 to the spring of 1917 when the line was completed. Along the route was the Kivach Waterfall on the Suna River, which originates in Lake Kivijärvi in Karelia and flows 280 kilometers to the Kondopoga Bay of Lake Onega. Visible in this view across the waterfall is the tiny village of Kivach, with three log houses. Because of the multiple ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Suna River at the Girvas Waterfall
The Murmansk Railroad was built by the Russian government during World War I to connect Petrograd (Saint Petersburg) to the ice-free port of Romanov-on-Murman (now Murmansk). Construction lasted from 1914 to the spring of 1917 when the line was completed. Along the route were the Por-Porog Rapids on the Suna River, in the Kondopoga region of Karelia. Seen here are the jagged rocks at the top of the rapids, before the Suna enters Lake Voronovo. Visible on the other side are logs caught in the rapids on the way to ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Suna River before the Kivach Waterfall
The Murmansk Railroad was built by the Russian government during World War I to connect Petrograd (Saint Petersburg) to the ice-free port of Romanov-on-Murman (now Murmansk). Construction lasted from 1914 to the spring of 1917 when the line was completed. Along the route was the Kivach Waterfall on the Suna River, which originates in Lake Kivijärvi in Karelia and flows 280 kilometers to the Kondopoga Bay of Lake Onega. Seen here are jagged rock formations at the top of the rapids. On the main rock someone painted the name “Elise ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Girvas Waterfall. Suna River
The Murmansk Railroad was built by the Russian government during World War I to connect Petrograd (Saint Petersburg) to the ice-free port of Romanov-on-Murman (now Murmansk). Construction lasted from 1914 to the spring of 1917 when the line was completed. Along the route was the Por-Porog (misidentified in the caption as Girvas) Waterfall on the Suna River, in the Kondopoga region of Karelia. Seen here are the jagged rock outcroppings at the top of the rapids, before the Suna enters Lake Voronovo. Karelia is rich in granite and quartzite. In ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Sar Waterfall at Vyg Lake
The Murmansk Railroad was built by the Russian government during World War I to connect Petrograd (Saint Petersburg) to the ice-free port of Romanov-on-Murman (now Murmansk). Construction lasted from 1914 to the spring of 1917 when the line was completed. Among the natural features near this route was the Lower (Nizhnii) Vyg River, which flows 102 kilometers from Lake Vygozero in Karelia to the Onega Bay of the White Sea. The caption for this image identifies this scene as the Sar Waterfall (officially known as the Voitskii), situated at the ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Sar Waterfall at Vyg Lake
The Murmansk Railroad was built by the Russian government during World War I to connect Petrograd (Saint Petersburg) to the ice-free port of Romanov-on-Murman (now Murmansk). Construction lasted from 1914 to the spring of 1917 when the line was completed. Among the natural features near this route was the Lower (Nizhnii) Vyg River, which flows 102 kilometers from Lake Vygozero in Karelia to the Onega Bay of the White Sea. The caption identifies this scene as the Sar Waterfall (officially known as the Voitskii), situated at the point where the ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Victoria Falls
This late 19th- or early 20th-century photograph of Victoria Falls is from the Frank and Frances Carpenter Collection at the Library of Congress. The falls lie on the Zambezi River that separates Zambia from Zimbabwe. David Livingstone, the British explorer and missionary who in 1855 became the first European to see the falls, named it in honor of Queen Victoria. The local Kololo tribe called the falls “Mosi-oa-Tunya,” meaning 'the smoke that thunders,' after the vast cloud of mist and spray created by the cascading water. The Zambezi is about ...
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Zhaskvar Falls. Chernaia River Seven Versts from Gagra
At the beginning of the 20th century, the Russian photographer Sergei Mikhailovich Prokudin-Gorskii (1863–1944) used a special color photography process to create a visual record of the Russian Empire. Some of Prokudin-Gorskii’s photographs date from about 1905, but the bulk of his work is from between 1909 and 1915, when, with the support of Tsar Nicholas II and the Ministry of Transportation, he undertook extended trips through many different parts of the empire.
Contributed by Library of Congress
View of a River Leading to Waterfall, Bridge, and Buildings
At the beginning of the 20th century, the Russian photographer Sergei Mikhailovich Prokudin-Gorskii (1863–1944) used a special color photography process to create a visual record of the Russian Empire. Some of Prokudin-Gorskii’s photographs date from about 1905, but the bulk of his work is from between 1909 and 1915, when, with the support of Tsar Nicholas II and the Ministry of Transportation, he undertook extended trips through many different parts of the empire.
Contributed by Library of Congress
The Cascades, Constantine, Algeria
This photochrome print of a scene in Constantine (present-day Qacentina), Algeria, is part of “Views of People and Sites in Algeria” from the catalog of the Detroit Publishing Company (1905). The print features a waterfall in one of the ravines that border the city, which, according to the 1911 edition of Baedeker’s The Mediterranean, seaports and searoutes: Handbook for Travellers, “present a most impressive scene, especially during the melting of the snow or after heavy rain,” and which are traversed by three bridges and contain the ruins of a ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
The Guadalupe Waterfall, Province of Medellín
This striking watercolor by Henry Price (1819–63) shows the waterfall on the Guadalupe River, northeast of Medellín, Colombia. In the lower right are seen the figures of a surveying team at work, their small sizes pointing up the enormity of the falls. Price was a British painter and musician who was one of the draftsmen of the Comisión Corográfica (Chorographic Commission), a body tasked with studying the geography, natural resources, natural history, regional culture, and agriculture of the Republic of New Granada (present-day Colombia and Panama). He was born ...
View of the Waterfall on the Vinagre River, Called Waterfall of the Nuns, Popayán Province
This watercolor by Manuel María Paz (1820−1902) shows a stylized view of a waterfall on the Vinagre River (so called for its sulfuric and acidic waters) in the Province of Popayán (present-day Department of Cauca), southwest Colombia. This cascade is known, perhaps for its white and grey coloring, as “las Monjas” (the Nuns). With its pale washes and miniaturized human figures, the painting emphasizes the waterfall’s dramatic drop. The watercolor is typical of Paz’s work, which captured the diversity of the population of New Granada and depicted ...
Waterfall on the Anambio River, Popayán Province
This watercolor by Manuel María Paz (1820−1902) shows a waterfall plunging down a steep-sided gorge in Popayán Province (present-day Cauca Department), southwest Colombia. The stream or river, now called the Quebrada Anambio, rises more than 2,300 meters above sea level and flows near the southern end of the Cordillera Central of the Andes. The watercolor is typical of Paz’s work, which captured the diversity of the population of Colombia and depicted the daily activities and traditional customs of the country’s different ethnic, racial, and social groups ...
View of the Waterfall of the “Excomulgado," Túquerres Province
This watercolor by Manuel María Paz (1820−1902) shows the impressive waterfall known as the Excomulgado (the excommunicated one) in Túquerres Province (present-day Nariño Department), in southwestern Colombia. Legend has it that the waterfall was where a priest, in the early colonial days, committed suicide after having been excommunicated by the church. The watercolor is typical of Paz’s work, which captured the diversity of the population of Colombia and depicted the daily activities and traditional customs of the country’s different ethnic, racial, and social groups. Paz was born ...
Plan of the Tietê River Summarized with All Its Turns: Waterfalls are from Port of the Araritaguaba up to the Big Paraná River
This map shows the Tietê River, which runs for 1,100 kilometers through the southeastern Brazilian state of São Paulo before connecting with the Paraná River, South America’s second longest river. Although the source of the river is located near the sea, the topography of the region forces the river to flow into the interior of the continent. Brazil’s largest city, São Paulo, grew up along the banks of the Tietê.