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The Uganda Journal, Volume I, Number 1, January 1934
The Uganda Literary and Scientific Society was established at Entebbe, Uganda Protectorate, in 1923. Its main activity consisted of the reading of papers and the delivery of lectures on topics relating to Uganda. In 1933 the society moved its headquarters to Kampala and decided to issue a regular publication, The Uganda Journal. The journal’s declared aim was “to collect and publish information which may add to our knowledge of Uganda and to record that which in the course of time might be lost.” Four issues per year were published ...
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National Library of Uganda
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The Volcano Smeroe (View from the Passaroeng Residence)
This colored lithograph shows Smeroe (Semeru), the largest volcano on the island of Java. Also known as Mahameru, or the Great Mountain, the volcano erupted at least once a year during the 19th century, and since 1967 has been in a state of near-constant activity. This view from the town of Pasuruan shows a plume of smoke coming from the top of mountain. The Dutch painter Abraham Salm (1801-76) spent 29 years in Indonesia, where he produced many dramatic landscape paintings. This lithograph is one of 15 views of Java ...
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Royal Netherlands Institute of Southeast Asian and the Caribbean Studies KITLV
Central Railroad and Volcano De Agua, Guatemala
This photograph from the Frank and Frances Carpenter Collection at the Library of Congress shows Guatemala’s central railroad with the Volcán de Agua (Water volcano) in the background. Frank G. Carpenter (1855–1924) was an American writer of books on travel and world geography. whose works helped to popularize cultural anthropology and geography in the United States in the early years of the 20th century. Consisting of photographs taken and gathered by Carpenter and his daughter Frances (1890–1972) to illustrate his writings, the collection includes an estimated 16 ...
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Library of Congress
View of Arequipa and Mountian Misti, Peru
This photograph of a scene in Peru is from the Frank and Frances Carpenter Collection at the Library of Congress. Frank G. Carpenter (1855–1924) was an American writer of books on travel and world geography, whose works helped to popularize cultural anthropology and geography in the United States in the early years of the 20th century. Consisting of photographs taken and gathered by Carpenter and his daughter Frances (1890–1972) to illustrate his writings, the collection includes an estimated 16,800 photographs and 7,000 glass and film negatives ...
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Library of Congress
The Plateau of Herveo, Ruiz, Tolima, Santa Isabel, and Great Crater, Province of Córdova
This watercolor by Henry Price (1819–63) depicts a plateau and volcanic mountains, with Nevado del Ruiz, also known as the Mesa de Herveo, on the right, and Tolima and Santa Isabel seen in the distance. Men in colorful ponchos are surveying the area. Price labels the scene as located in the province of Córdova; other sources identify it as in the province of Mariquita, about 130 kilometers west of Bogotá. Price was a British painter and musician who was one of the draftsmen of the Comisión Corográfica (Chorographic Commission ...
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National Library of Colombia
View of Cali and of the Snow-Capped Mount Huila, Province of Buenaventura
This watercolor by Manuel María Paz (1820−1902) shows a view of the city of Cali with Mount Huila in the background. The mountain lies about 80 kilometers southeast of Cali and is an active volcano. Santiago de Cali, also known simply as Cali, is the third-largest city in present-day Colombia. In 1853, when Paz painted this picture, Cali was in the province of Buenaventura; today it is the capital of Valle del Cauca Department. The watercolor is typical of Paz’s work, which captured the diversity of the population ...
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National Library of Colombia
Nevado del Quindio, Province of Cauca
This watercolor by Manuel María Paz (1820–1902) shows the dormant volcano Nevado del Quindío in Colombia. Rising to 4,760 meters in the Cordillera Central, the middle of the three Andean mountain ranges that run north–south through the country, the volcano is located in what was then Cauca Province (now Quindío Department). The watercolor is typical of Paz’s work, which captured the diversity of the population of New Granada and depicted the daily activities and traditional customs of the country’s different ethnic, racial, and social groups ...
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National Library of Colombia
View of the Village of Puracé, Painted from the Pesares Highlands, Popayán Province
This watercolor by Manuel María Paz (1820−1902) shows the view from the highlands above the city of Popayán in the Cordillera Central of the Andes, in present-day Cauca Department, southwest Colombia. The view looks across to the little village of Puracé and the Puracé Volcano, barely visible in the distance, which is one of the most active in Colombia. The watercolor is typical of Paz’s work, which captured the diversity of the population of Colombia and depicted the daily activities and traditional customs of the country’s different ...
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National Library of Colombia
View of the Green Lake, Túquerres Province
This watercolor by Manuel María Paz (1820−1902) shows the dramatically green waters of Laguna Verde (Green Lake) in Túquerres Province (present-day Nariño Department), southwestern Colombia. The crescent-shaped lake sits in the caldera of the semi-dormant Azufral Volcano and derives its color from sulfur and iron sediments (azufre is the Spanish word for sulfur). The lake is almost 4,000 meters above sea level. The watercolor is typical of Paz’s work, which captured the diversity of the population of Colombia and depicted the daily activities and traditional customs of ...
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National Library of Colombia
View of the Active Volcanoes of Cumbal and Chiles, Túquerres Province
This watercolor by Manuel María Paz (1820−1902) shows the mountainous landscape of Túquerres Province (present-day Nariño Department) in southwestern Colombia. The snowcapped volcanoes of Cumbal and Chiles, located on the border with Ecuador and both rising to more than 4,750 meters above sea level, are seen looming in the distance. In the foreground is a village, where three men are seen talking near the cemetery. The watercolor is typical of Paz’s work, which captured the diversity of the population of Colombia and depicted the daily activities and ...
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National Library of Colombia