356 results in English
Maksimovskii Rock near the Village of Rodina. Chusovaia River
At the beginning of the 20th century, the Russian photographer Sergei Mikhailovich Prokudin-Gorskii (1863–1944) used a special color photography process to create a visual record of the Russian Empire. Some of Prokudin-Gorskii’s photographs date from about 1905, but the bulk of his work is from between 1909 and 1915, when, with the support of Tsar Nicholas II and the Ministry of Transportation, he undertook extended trips through many different parts of the empire.
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General View of Kamenskii Factory with the Dam. Kamensk-Uralskii
At the beginning of the 20th century, the Russian photographer Sergei Mikhailovich Prokudin-Gorskii (1863–1944) used a special color photography process to create a visual record of the Russian Empire. Some of Prokudin-Gorskii’s photographs date from about 1905, but the bulk of his work is from between 1909 and 1915, when, with the support of Tsar Nicholas II and the Ministry of Transportation, he undertook extended trips through many different parts of the empire.
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Satkinskii State Plant
At the beginning of the 20th century, the Russian photographer Sergei Mikhailovich Prokudin-Gorskii (1863–1944) used a special color photography process to create a visual record of the Russian Empire. Some of Prokudin-Gorskii’s photographs date from about 1905, but the bulk of his work is from between 1909 and 1915, when, with the support of Tsar Nicholas II and the Ministry of Transportation, he undertook extended trips through many different parts of the empire.
Contributed by Library of Congress
Scene in Zlatoust
At the beginning of the 20th century, the Russian photographer Sergei Mikhailovich Prokudin-Gorskii (1863–1944) used a special color photography process to create a visual record of the Russian Empire. Some of Prokudin-Gorskii’s photographs date from about 1905, but the bulk of his work is from between 1909 and 1915, when, with the support of Tsar Nicholas II and the Ministry of Transportation, he undertook extended trips through many different parts of the empire.
Contributed by Library of Congress
In the Urals
At the beginning of the 20th century, the Russian photographer Sergei Mikhailovich Prokudin-Gorskii (1863–1944) used a special color photography process to create a visual record of the Russian Empire. Some of Prokudin-Gorskii’s photographs date from about 1905, but the bulk of his work is from between 1909 and 1915, when, with the support of Tsar Nicholas II and the Ministry of Transportation, he undertook extended trips through many different parts of the empire.
Contributed by Library of Congress
In the Urals
At the beginning of the 20th century, the Russian photographer Sergei Mikhailovich Prokudin-Gorskii (1863–1944) used a special color photography process to create a visual record of the Russian Empire. Some of Prokudin-Gorskii’s photographs date from about 1905, but the bulk of his work is from between 1909 and 1915, when, with the support of Tsar Nicholas II and the Ministry of Transportation, he undertook extended trips through many different parts of the empire.
Contributed by Library of Congress
Razguliai, Outskirts of the City of Perm
From 1909 to 1912, Russian photographer Sergei Mikhailovich Prokudin-Gorskii (1863–1944) made several trips to the territory around the Ural Mountains, where he photographed railroad installations, factories, and urban scenes. Shown in this 1909 photograph is the Razguliai district on the edge of the city of Perm. Construction in this district began no later than 1723. A factory settlement on the small Egoshikha River, it is considered the oldest area of Perm, which received town status in 1781. The large wooden houses in the image are log structures, some of ...
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General View of the City of Perm from Gorodskie Gorki
From 1909 to 1912, Russian photographer Sergei Mikhailovich Prokudin-Gorskii (1863–1944) made several trips to the territory around the Ural Mountains, where he photographed railroad installations, factories, and urban scenes. This 1909 photograph shows the central district of the city of Perm, seen in a view toward the west from an area called City Hills. The complex of brick buildings in the foreground served as the maintenance center for the Urals Railway. On the right is the bustling waterfront of the Kama River, one of the main tributaries of the ...
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City of Perm. General View
From 1909 to 1912, Russian photographer Sergei Mikhailovich Prokudin-Gorskii (1863–1944) made several trips to the territory around the Ural Mountains, where he photographed railroad installations, factories, and urban scenes. This 1909 photograph shows the central district of the city of Perm, seen in a view toward the southwest from an area called City Hills. A mixture of wooden and masonry houses line the streets approaching downtown. In the right background stands the Cathedral of the Transfiguration, with a neoclassical bell tower. Smoke from a factory chimney obscures the bell ...
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View of the City of Perm from the Railroad Bridge across Kama
From 1909 to 1912, Russian photographer Sergei Mikhailovich Prokudin-Gorskii (1863–1944) made several trips to the territory around the Ural Mountains, where he photographed railroad installations, factories, and urban scenes. This 1909 photograph shows the central district of the city of Perm, seen in a view toward the east from the railroad bridge spanning the Kama River. As in most views of central Perm, the dominant feature is the Cathedral of the Transfiguration, with its neoclassical bell tower. Visible to the right is the bell tower of the Cathedral of ...
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Perm. Summertime Location of the Exchange
From 1909 to 1912, Russian photographer Sergei Mikhailovich Prokudin-Gorskii (1863–1944) made several trips to the territory around the Ural Mountains, where he photographed railroad installations, factories, and urban scenes. Shown here is the wooden pavilion built in 1908 to serve as the summer office of the stock exchange in the city of Perm. Its construction followed improvements to Embankment Park (a park overlooking the Kama River) undertaken in 1906–07 (evident in the recently planted saplings). The profusely decorated small structure exemplified the “Ropet style,” named after Ivan Ropet ...
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Perm. Headquarters of the Ural Railway Administration
From 1909 to 1912, Russian photographer Sergei Mikhailovich Prokudin-Gorskii (1863–1944) made several trips to the territory around the Ural Mountains, where he photographed railroad installations, factories, and urban scenes. Shown in this 1909 photograph is the headquarters of the Urals Railway Administration in the city of Perm, built in 1888–92 to an eclectic style by I.A. Bykhovets. This imposing building is located next to the Perm I train station (the city’s oldest), completed in 1878 by Bykhovets, and partially visible on the left. The two buildings ...
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Perm. Mary Magdalene Church
From 1909 to 1912, Russian photographer Sergei Mikhailovich Prokudin-Gorskii (1863–1944) made several trips to the territory around the Ural Mountains, where he photographed railroad installations, factories, and urban scenes. This 1909 photograph shows the Church of Saint Mary Magdalene in the city of Perm. The church was built in 1889–92 as part of a large orphanage, and the imposing structure was designed in the style of the Italian Renaissance by Aleksandr B. Turchevich-Glumov (1855–1909). Funds for construction came largely from local merchants. In addition to its religious ...
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Perm. Mary Magdalene Church
From 1909 to 1912, Russian photographer Sergei Mikhailovich Prokudin-Gorskii (1863–1944) made several trips to the territory around the Ural Mountains, where he photographed railroad installations, factories, and urban scenes. This 1909 photograph shows the Church of Saint Mary Magdalene in the city of Perm. The view is from the southwest, and clearly shows the imposing bell tower, the upper part of which has not survived. The church was built in 1889–92 as part of a large orphanage, and was designed in the style of the Italian Renaissance by ...
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Steam Engine "Kompaund" with a Schmidt Super-Heater
From 1909 to 1912, Russian photographer Sergei Mikhailovich Prokudin-Gorskii (1863–1944) made several trips to the territory around the Ural Mountains, where he photographed railroad installations, factories, and urban scenes. Shown here is a Kompaund (Compound) steam locomotive of the Ab type, with a Schmidt superheater. The number between the coupler indicates Ab 132, produced at the Briansk locomotive factory in 1909—shortly before Prokudin-Gorskii took this photograph. These locomotives were among the most powerful produced in Russia in the early 20th century, with a top speed of 115 kilometers ...
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City of Ekaterinburg. General View of the Central Part
From 1909 to 1912, Russian photographer Sergei Mikhailovich Prokudin-Gorskii (1863–1944) made several trips to the territory around the Ural Mountains, where he photographed railroad installations, factories, and urban scenes. The caption for this photograph mistakenly identifies this as a view of central Ekaterinburg (named Sverdlovsk 1924–91). In fact it is a view taken in 1909 of a workers’ settlement on the outskirts of the town of Ekaterinburg known as Verkh-Isetskii zavod (factory on the Upper Iset). The Upper Iset factory was established following the creation in 1725 of ...
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City of Ekaterinburg. General View of the Southern Part
From 1909 to 1912, Russian photographer Sergei Mikhailovich Prokudin-Gorskii (1863–1944) made several trips to the territory around the Ural Mountains, where he photographed railroad installations, factories, and urban scenes. This 1909 photograph shows the southern districts of the town of Ekaterinburg (named Sverdlovsk 1924–91), dotted with churches and bell towers, many of which were demolished during the Soviet period. Visible with two domes in the center background is the Church of the Icon of the Mother of God “Assuage My Sorrow.” Attached to the archbishop’s residence, this ...
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City of Ekaterinburg. General View of the Northern Part
From 1909 to 1912, Russian photographer Sergei Mikhailovich Prokudin-Gorskii (1863–1944) made several trips to the territory around the Ural Mountains, where he photographed railroad installations, factories, and urban scenes. This 1909 photograph shows the northern part of the town of Ekaterinburg (named Sverdlovsk 1924–91). There is a clear demarcation between pasturage (with a resting cow) and a long boundary street lined with houses. The houses are built primarily of wood, and typically have four-sloped metal roofs that are painted red. Some of the houses are elevated on a ...
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City of Ekaterinburg. Pond Embankment
From 1909 to 1912, Russian photographer Sergei Mikhailovich Prokudin-Gorskii (1863–1944) made several trips to the territory around the Ural Mountains, where he photographed railroad installations, factories, and urban scenes. This 1909 photograph shows an embankment along City Pond in the town of Ekaterinburg (named Sverdlovsk 1924–91). The pond was created in 1724 when the engineer Georg Wilhelm de Gennin (Hennin) dammed the Iset River to create a power source for an iron factory established by order of Peter the Great in 1723. The settlement that sprung up around ...
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Pond Embankment in Ekaterinburg
From 1909 to 1912, Russian photographer Sergei Mikhailovich Prokudin-Gorskii (1863–1944) made several trips to the territory around the Ural Mountains, where he photographed railroad installations, factories, and urban scenes. This 1909 photograph shows an embankment along the upper west side of City Pond in the town of Ekaterinburg (named Sverdlovsk 1924–91). The pond was created in 1724 when the engineer Georg Wilhelm de Gennin (Hennin) dammed the Iset River to create a power source for an iron factory established by order of Peter the Great in 1723. The ...
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Ekaterinburg. View of the House of the Chief of the Gornyi District from the Dam
The center of the Ekaterinburg is occupied by a picturesque pond (more like a lake in size), which was formed by damming the Iset River in 1723. Along the west bank of City Pond was the attractive Gymnasium Embankment, named after the nearby classical high school. The most prominent landmark on the embankment was the mansion built for the chief mining director of the Ural State Factories. Designed in a neoclassical style by the prominent local architect Mikhail Malakhov, the mansion was begun in 1818 and completed in the 1830s ...
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City of Ekaterinburg. Central Part with the Pond
From 1909 to 1912, Russian photographer Sergei Mikhailovich Prokudin-Gorskii (1863–1944) made several trips to the territory around the Ural Mountains, where he photographed railroad installations, factories, and urban scenes. This 1909 photograph shows the main embankment at the southern end of City Pond in the town of Ekaterinburg (named Sverdlovsk 1924–91). The pond was created in 1724 when the engineer Georg Wilhelm de Gennin (Hennin) dammed the Iset River to create a power source for an iron factory established by order of Peter the Great in 1723. The ...
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View of Ekaterinburg from the House of the Chief of the Gornyi District
From 1909 to 1912, Russian photographer Sergei Mikhailovich Prokudin-Gorskii (1863–1944) made several trips to the territory around the Ural Mountains. This 1909 photograph shows the main embankment at the southeastern part of City Pond in the town of Ekaterinburg (named Sverdlovsk 1924–91). The dominant landmark is the Church of the Ascension, with a tall bell tower at the west front. Begun in 1790, the church was modified and expanded during the 19th century using a mixture of architectural styles. To the left is the grand Rastorguev-Kharitonov mansion, built ...
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City of Ekaterinburg. Observatory on Pleshiv Hill
From 1909 to 1912, Russian photographer Sergei Mikhailovich Prokudin-Gorskii (1863–1944) made several trips to the territory around the Ural Mountains, where he photographed railroad installations, factories, urban settings, and natural scenes. This 1909 photograph shows the astronomical observatory on Pleshivaia (Observatory) Hill. The site, formerly on the outskirts of the town of Ekaterinburg (named Sverdlovsk 1924–91), was first identified as a favorable located for an observatory by the prominent Prussian naturalist Alexander von Humboldt (1769–1859), who visited the area in 1829. Through the initiative of the Russian ...
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Verkh-Isetskii Factory near the City of Ekaterinburg
From 1909 to 1912, Russian photographer Sergei Mikhailovich Prokudin-Gorskii (1863–1944) made several trips to the territory around the Ural Mountains, where he photographed railroad installations, factories, urban settings, and natural scenes. This photograph shows the Verkh-Isetskii Zavod (factory on the Upper Iset’), one of the earliest settlements near the town of Ekaterinburg. The factory in the settlement was established in 1726, after Peter the Great implemented a strategy to build metalworking facilities near iron ore sources in the Urals. Hydraulic power for the factory came from a large pond ...
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Factory Settlement of the Verkh-Isetskii Factory. Ekaterinburg
From 1909 to 1912, Russian photographer Sergei Mikhailovich Prokudin-Gorskii (1863–1944) made several trips to the territory around the Ural Mountains, where he photographed railroad installations, factories, urban settings, and natural scenes. The caption for this image mistakenly identifies the subject as the Verkh-Isetskii factory. It is actually a photograph taken in 1909 of central Ekaterinburg (named Sverdlovsk 1924–91), and it clearly shows the churches and bell towers of the town. On the outskirts of the town are houses typical of the region, built of wood on a brick ...
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Ekaterinburg. Entrance into the Tikhvinskii Monastery for Women
Founded in the early 18th century, Ekaterinburg was home to several monastic institutions, including the New Tikhvin Convent, formally established in 1809. By the beginning of the 20th century it was one of the largest convents in Russia, with its capacious Cathedral of Saint Alexander Nevsky (1838-52; not extant). This view shows three churches along the east wall:  the Church of Saint Feodosii (far left); the Church of the Presentation, located over the convent’s east gate; and the Church of the Icon of the Mother of God “Joy to ...
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Refectory and Church of the Grieving Mother of God in the Monastery. Tikhvinskii Monastery, Ekaterinburg
From 1909 to 1912, Russian photographer Sergei Mikhailovich Prokudin-Gorskii (1863–1944) made several trips to the territory around the Ural Mountains, where he photographed railroad installations, factories, urban settings, and natural scenes. In 1909 and 1910 he photographed extensively in the Urals region, including the city of Ekaterinburg (named Sverdlovsk 1924–91). Founded in the early 18th century, Ekaterinburg was home to several monastic institutions, including the New Tikhvin Convent, formally established in 1809. By the beginning of the 20th century, this was one of the largest convents in Russia ...
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Site of Former Altar in a Temporary Tent Church of the Musketeers Regiment. Ekaterinburg
From 1909 to 1912, Russian photographer Sergei Mikhailovich Prokudin-Gorskii (1863–1944) made several trips to the territory around the Ural Mountains, where he photographed railroad installations, factories, urban settings, and natural scenes. In 1909 and 1910 he photographed extensively in the Urals region, including the city of Ekaterinburg (named Sverdlovsk 1924–91). The origin of the city dates to 1723, when Peter the Great ordered the development of the largest iron factory in Russia on the Upper Iset’ River. A large pond was created by damming the river, providing hydraulic ...
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Kharitonov's House in the City of Ekaterinburg
From 1909 to 1912, Russian photographer Sergei Mikhailovich Prokudin-Gorskii (1863–1944) made several trips to the territory around the Ural Mountains, where he photographed railroad installations, factories, urban settings, and natural scenes. In 1909 and 1910 he photographed extensively in the Urals region, including the city of Ekaterinburg (named Sverdlovsk 1924–91). This 1909 photograph shows the grand Kharitonov-Rastorguev mansion under a light dusting of snow on Ascension Hill. The area was developed in the late 1820s by Peter Yakovlevich Kharitonov (1794–1838), who married Maria Rastorgueva in 1816. Both ...
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Ekaterinburg. A Pond in the Kharitonov Garden
This view shows the pond in Kharitonov Park, Ekaterinburg, initially planned as a private park adjoining the Rastorguyev estate on Ascension Hill. The area was developed in the late 1820s by Peter Yakovlevich Kharitonov (1794-1838), who married Maria Rastorgueva in 1816. Both families were prominent owners of metal-working factories in the Urals. Accused of cruelty towards workers at his Kyshtym factory, Kharitonov was exiled to Finland in 1837. The territory of his estate reverted to the city, which opened it as the first major public park in Ekaterinburg. A large ...
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Lane in Kharitonov Garden. Ekaterinburg
This photograph shows Kharitonov Park in the city of Ekaterinburg in the Urals region of Russia as it appeared in 1910. The park was first developed in the late 1820s by Peter Kharitonov as a private park adjoining the Rastorguev estate on Ascension Hill. Kharitonov had married Maria Rastorgueva in 1816, and the Kharitonov and Rastorgueva families both were prominent owners of metal-working factories in the Urals. After 1836, the land reverted to the city, which opened it as the first major public park in Ekaterinburg. A wide variety of ...
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A General's Dacha
At the beginning of the 20th century, the Russian photographer Sergei Mikhailovich Prokudin-Gorskii (1863–1944) used a special color photography process to create a visual record of the Russian Empire. Some of Prokudin-Gorskii’s photographs date from about 1905, but the bulk of his work is from between 1909 and 1915, when, with the support of Tsar Nicholas II and the Ministry of Transportation, he undertook extended trips through many different parts of the empire.
Contributed by Library of Congress
Gates of the Imperial Lapidary Works. Ekaterinburg
From 1909 to 1912, Russian photographer Sergei Mikhailovich Prokudin-Gorskii (1863–1944) made several trips to the territory around the Ural Mountains, where he photographed railroad installations, factories, urban settings, and natural scenes. In 1909 and 1910 he photographed extensively in the Urals region, including the city of Ekaterinburg (named Sverdlovsk 1924–91). Seen in this photograph from 1909 is a wall segment of the main city dam with a plaque commemorating the founding of the city. (The caption mistakenly identifies it as the gate to the Imperial Lapidary Factory, which ...
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Successive Stages of Grinding a Stone Egg. Imperial Lapidary Works, Ekaterinburg
From 1909 to 1912, Russian photographer Sergei Mikhailovich Prokudin-Gorskii (1863–1944) made several trips to the territory around the Ural Mountains, where he photographed railroad installations, factories, urban settings, and natural scenes. In 1909 and 1910 he photographed extensively in the Urals region, including the city of Ekaterinburg (named Sverdlovsk 1924–91). Founded in 1751, the Ekaterinburg Lapidary Factory was the first of its kind in Russia. Located in the center of town at City Pond, it had a dedicated water mill to facilitate the laborious functions of cutting, grinding ...
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Planing Machine at the Imperial Lapidary Works. Ekaterinburg
From 1909 to 1912, Russian photographer Sergei Mikhailovich Prokudin-Gorskii (1863–1944) made several trips to the territory around the Ural Mountains, where he photographed railroad installations, factories, urban settings, and natural scenes. In 1909 and 1910 he photographed extensively in the Urals region, including the city of Ekaterinburg (named Sverdlovsk 1924–91). Founded in 1751, the Ekaterinburg Lapidary Factory was the first of its kind in Russia. Located in the center of town at City Pond, it had a dedicated water mill to facilitate the laborious functions of cutting, grinding ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Planing Machine. Imperial Lapidary Works, Ekaterinburg
From 1909 to 1912, Russian photographer Sergei Mikhailovich Prokudin-Gorskii (1863–1944) made several trips to the territory around the Ural Mountains, where he photographed railroad installations, factories, urban settings, and natural scenes. In 1909 and 1910 he photographed extensively in the Urals region, including the city of Ekaterinburg (named Sverdlovsk 1924–91). Founded in 1751, the Ekaterinburg Lapidary Factory was the first of its kind in Russia. Located in the center of town at City Pond, it had a dedicated water mill to facilitate the laborious functions of cutting, grinding ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Samples of Models
At the beginning of the 20th century, the Russian photographer Sergei Mikhailovich Prokudin-Gorskii (1863–1944) used a special color photography process to create a visual record of the Russian Empire. Some of Prokudin-Gorskii’s photographs date from about 1905, but the bulk of his work is from between 1909 and 1915, when, with the support of Tsar Nicholas II and the Ministry of Transportation, he undertook extended trips through many different parts of the empire.
Contributed by Library of Congress
Skeleton of Large-Horned Stag in the Museum of the City of Ekaterinburg
From 1909 to 1912, Russian photographer Sergei Mikhailovich Prokudin-Gorskii (1863–1944) made several trips to the territory around the Ural Mountains, where he photographed railroad installations, factories, urban settings, and natural scenes. In 1909 and 1910 he photographed extensively in the Urals region, including the city of Ekaterinburg (named Sverdlovsk 1924–91). Seen in this 1909 photograph is the skeleton of a large-horned stag on display at the Museum of the Urals Society of Lovers of Natural Sciences, founded in 1870. In 1886, the society was allotted space for its ...
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View from Chertovo Gorodishche
At the beginning of the 20th century, the Russian photographer Sergei Mikhailovich Prokudin-Gorskii (1863–1944) used a special color photography process to create a visual record of the Russian Empire. Some of Prokudin-Gorskii’s photographs date from about 1905, but the bulk of his work is from between 1909 and 1915, when, with the support of Tsar Nicholas II and the Ministry of Transportation, he undertook extended trips through many different parts of the empire.
Contributed by Library of Congress
Eastern Portion of Chertovo Gorodishche
At the beginning of the 20th century, the Russian photographer Sergei Mikhailovich Prokudin-Gorskii (1863–1944) used a special color photography process to create a visual record of the Russian Empire. Some of Prokudin-Gorskii’s photographs date from about 1905, but the bulk of his work is from between 1909 and 1915, when, with the support of Tsar Nicholas II and the Ministry of Transportation, he undertook extended trips through many different parts of the empire.
Contributed by Library of Congress
Chertovo Gorodishche
This vista was taken near a picturesque site known as Chertovo Gorodishche (Devil’s Fort) near Ekaterinburg, the major city in this region of the Ural Mountains. Formed by a massive outcropping of sedimentary rock eroded into unusual shapes, the site was largely inaccessible until construction of a railroad through this part of the Urals in the early 1880s. On the line to the northwest of Ekaterinburg is the Iset’ Station (after the Iset’ River) near Tolstikha Mountain, beyond which is Chertovo Gorodishche. This view shows rock towers rising above ...
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