4 results
Group of Hazara Chiefs
This photograph of a group of Besuti Hazara chiefs with two boys and a mule is from an album of rare historical photographs depicting people and places associated with the Second Anglo-Afghan War. The origins of the Hazara people of Afghanistan are uncertain. One theory holds that they are descended from the Mongol tribes who invaded Afghanistan in the 13th century. They are predominantly Ithnā'ashariyyah (Twelver Shia Muslims) who speak a Persian dialect containing words of Mongolian origin. They form Afghanistan’s third largest ethnic group and have historically ...
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Library of Congress
Sir Bolan, an Achakzai Chief
This portrait of a seated Achakzai chief and five of his associates is from an album of rare historical photographs depicting people and places associated with the Second Anglo-Afghan War. The Achakzai are a Pashtun tribal subgroup, residing primarily in eastern Afghanistan, between Quetta and Kandahar. Most of the tribe took up arms against the British Raj when its rule reached the Afghan border. Little is known about this chief’s background, his allegiance during the war, or what role he might have played in it. The Second Anglo-Afghan War ...
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Library of Congress
Zulu Chief, South Africa
This 1895 photo of a Zulu chief in native dress standing in front of a thatched hut is from the Frank and Frances Carpenter Collection at the Library of Congress. Frank G. Carpenter (1855-1924) was an American writer of books on travel and world geography whose works helped to popularize cultural anthropology and geography in the United States in the early years of the 20th century. The Zulu are southern Africa’s largest ethnic group. Zululand, where this photograph was taken, was absorbed into the British colony of Natal following ...
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Library of Congress
Tawhiao, the Maori king
This late-19th century photograph is from the Frank and Frances Carpenter Collection at the Library of Congress. Frank G. Carpenter (1855-1924) was an American writer of books on travel and world geography whose works helped to popularize cultural anthropology and geography in the United States in the early years of the 20th century. Consisting of photographs taken and gathered by Carpenter and his daughter Frances (1890-1972) to illustrate his writings, the collection includes an estimated 16,800 photographs and 7,000 glass and film negatives. Tawhiao (1822-94) was a Maori ...
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Library of Congress