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14 results
Sketch of Ohrid
This pencil drawing is a sketch made in 1923 for a tourist map of the city of Ohrid, Former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia. Ohrid was at that time part of the newly established Kingdom of Serbs, Croats, and Slovenes; until 1912 it was under Ottoman rule. Situated on the shores of Lake Ohrid, the city is the site of one of the oldest human settlements in Europe, dating back to the Neolithic period. Known as Lychnidos at the time of the ancient Greeks, it developed into an important center of ...
Contributed by
National and University Library “St Kliment Ohridski” – Skopje
Killing Time
Highways to the southern states of the United States opened up during the second decade of the 20th century, allowing men and women from around the country to see the unique sites of Florida's interior, away from the cities on the east and west coasts. After the completion of the highway from Montreal to Miami in 1915, the number of automobile tourists increased dramatically. The original “tin can tourists” of the 1920s pioneered camper travel, and the practice became ever more popular after World War II, as young families ...
Contributed by
State Library and Archives of Florida
Wakulla Springs Glass-Bottom Boat Tour Chant by Luke Smith
The sound recording presented here features a chant recited by Luke Smith at the 1981 Florida Folk Festival in White Springs, Florida. Smith, a longtime guide on the Wakulla River, sings about the underwater environment and summons fish to the boat. His chant is reminiscent of African-American spirituals and field hollers common throughout the Deep South of the United States. Alligators, snakes, rare birds, and native exoticism are part of Florida’s tourism industry. Narrated boat tours at sites such as Wakulla Springs State Park, located at the spring south ...
Contributed by
State Library and Archives of Florida
Tourist's House, Spitzbergen, Norway
This photochrome print is part of “Landscape and Marine Views of Norway” from the catalog of the Detroit Photographic Company. The photo depicts a tourist house on Spitsbergen Island, part of the Svalvard Archipelago, located within the Arctic Circle, some 550 kilometers north of the Norwegian mainland. There were no tourist accommodations on Spitsbergen until around 1896, when the Vesteraalens Steamship Company constructed a tourist house along the coast of Advent Bay to accommodate an influx of visitors. The Detroit Photographic Company was launched as a photographic publishing firm in ...
Contributed by
Library of Congress
Indochina
This brochure, in English and French, was intended for tourists to French Indo-China. It extols the virtues of the region and its people, and includes a brief history and description of the country, followed by detailed maps and photographs of famous sites. Also included are a proposed itinerary and information about transportation, lodging, and prices. The brochure was produced by the Touring Club de France (Touring Club of France), a civic organization established in 1890 to promote tourism in France and later, in its colonies. The club published hotel and ...
Contributed by
Library of Congress
Thousands of Live Alligators on Free Exhibition
This broadside, dating from about 1950, is an advertisement for Osky’s, also known as Osky’s Curio Shop or Osky’s Alligator Store, a Jacksonville mercantile store that sold gift items, rare or bizarre decorative items, and goods made out of alligator skin, including lamps, purses, and wallets. The shop also exhibited live alligators and other reptiles. Jacksonville was home to many of Florida’s earliest tourist attractions, including the Florida Alligator Farm. Operating for several decades on Jacksonville’s historic Bay Street, Osky’s promoted itself through postcards ...
Contributed by
State Library and Archives of Florida
African American Man Wrestling an Alligator at the St. Augustine Alligator Farm
One of the symbols of the state of Florida in the popular imagination is the American alligator (Alligator mississippiensis). From the earliest European explorers to the present day, visitors have been fascinated by this cold-blooded freshwater reptile. With a name derived from the Spanish word lagarto (the lizard), alligators can grow to an average of 13–15 feet (4–4.6 meters) and weigh 500–1,000 pounds (227–453 kilograms). The alligator used to be prized for its meat and skin, was once hunted and harvested to near extinction ...
Contributed by
State Library and Archives of Florida
Welcome to Rainbow Springs
“Welcome to Rainbow Springs” is an example of the traditional tour guide performances delivered by guides at Florida’s natural springs, which were the first tourist attractions widely promoted in the state’s long history as a tourist destination. The speech is part welcome message, part folk song, and part tall tale, and demonstrates how African Americans were integral to the early tourist trade in Florida. The performance style is evocative of the minstrel songs and theatricals of earlier years. Rainbow Springs boat captain Skipper Lockett gives his recitation while ...
Contributed by
State Library and Archives of Florida
Give the World the Once over in the United States Navy
This colorful recruiting poster issued by the Press Navy Recruiting Bureau in New York in 1919 shows sailors as tourists in India, riding an elephant and taking snapshots. The text urges young men to join the U.S. Navy as a way to see the world. Between 1914 and the end of World War I, the U.S. Navy added nearly 80 vessels, mostly destroyers and submarines, and needed manpower to operate these ships. This poster is by James Henry Daugherty (1889–1974), a painter and illustrator who produced posters ...
Contributed by
Library of Congress
A View of Point Airy Opposite South Street, Philadelphia
Louis (or Lewis) Haugg was born in 1827 in Germany, immigrated to the United States in 1847, and worked as a lithographic artist and printer in Philadelphia circa 1855−1900. This advertisement shows the Point Airy Hotel and dock operated by David Warren at the resort located on the southern end of Windmill Island, a summer resort area popular in the 19th century before the removal of the island in 1897 to allow passage for larger ships on the Delaware River. Trees surround the resort. In the foreground, a wide ...
Contributed by
The Library Company of Philadelphia
Poster of a Coal Miner, Pennsylvania, 1937
This poster featuring the head and shoulders of a coal miner was made in 1937 for the Work Projects Administration (WPA) Federal Art Program in Pennsylvania. One of the New Deal programs launched by President Franklin D. Roosevelt to combat Depression-era unemployment, in 1936–43 the WPA supported the creation of more than 2,000 posters by well-known artists. Posters such as this one by Isadore Posoff were used to promote local tourism and to publicize a variety of programs from art to safety. Coal mining in Pennsylvania began in ...
Contributed by
Library of Congress
Rural Pennsylvania
Katherine Milhous (1894–1977) was a newspaper illustrator and book designer of Pennsylvania Dutch heritage. She attended the Philadelphia Museum School of Industrial Art and the Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts. During the Depression of the 1930s, she was employed as an artist for the Work Projects Administration (WPA) Federal Art Program and produced a colorful series of posters representing rural Pennsylvania. One of the New Deal programs launched by President Franklin D. Roosevelt to combat unemployment, in 1936–43 the WPA supported the creation of more than 2,000 ...
Contributed by
Library of Congress
Poster of an Amish Family, Pennsylvania
Katherine Milhous (1894–1977) was a newspaper illustrator and book designer of Pennsylvania Dutch heritage. She attended the Philadelphia Museum School of Industrial Art and the Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts. During the Depression of the 1930s, she was employed as an artist for the Work Projects Administration (WPA) Federal Art Program and produced a colorful series of posters representing rural Pennsylvania. One of the New Deal programs launched by President Franklin D. Roosevelt to combat unemployment, in 1936–43 the WPA supported the creation of more than 2,000 ...
Contributed by
Library of Congress
Philadelphia. Old Swedes Church
This poster depicting the Old Swedes Church in Philadelphia was made for the Work Projects Administration (WPA) Federal Art Program in Pennsylvania. One of the New Deal programs launched by President Franklin D. Roosevelt to combat Depression-era unemployment, in 1936–43 the WPA supported the creation of more than 2,000 posters by well-known artists. These posters were used to promote local tourism and to publicize a variety of programs from art to safety. The colony of New Sweden was established in 1637 and came to encompass parts of Delaware ...
Contributed by
Library of Congress