8 results
Tourist's House, Spitzbergen, Norway
This photochrome print is part of “Landscape and Marine Views of Norway” from the catalog of the Detroit Photographic Company. The photo depicts a tourist house on Spitsbergen Island, part of the Svalvard Archipelago, located within the Arctic Circle, some 550 kilometers north of the Norwegian mainland. There were no tourist accommodations on Spitsbergen until around 1896, when the Vesteraalens Steamship Company constructed a tourist house along the coast of Advent Bay to accommodate an influx of visitors. The Detroit Photographic Company was launched as a photographic publishing firm in ...
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Library of Congress
Thousands of Live Alligators on Free Exhibition
This broadside, dating from about 1950, is an advertisement for Osky’s, also known as Osky’s Curio Shop or Osky’s Alligator Store, a Jacksonville mercantile store that sold gift items, rare or bizarre decorative items, and goods made out of alligator skin, including lamps, purses, and wallets. The shop also exhibited live alligators and other reptiles. Jacksonville was home to many of Florida’s earliest tourist attractions, including the Florida Alligator Farm. Operating for several decades on Jacksonville’s historic Bay Street, Osky’s promoted itself through postcards ...
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State Library and Archives of Florida
African American Man Wrestling an Alligator at the St. Augustine Alligator Farm
One of the symbols of the state of Florida in the popular imagination is the American alligator (Alligator mississippiensis). From the earliest European explorers to the present day, visitors have been fascinated by this cold-blooded freshwater reptile. With a name derived from the Spanish word lagarto (the lizard), alligators can grow to an average of 13–15 feet (4–4.6 meters) and weigh 500–1,000 pounds (227–453 kilograms). The alligator used to be prized for its meat and skin, was once hunted and harvested to near extinction ...
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State Library and Archives of Florida
Give the World the Once over in the United States Navy
This colorful recruiting poster issued by the Press Navy Recruiting Bureau in New York in 1919 shows sailors as tourists in India, riding an elephant and taking snapshots. The text urges young men to join the U.S. Navy as a way to see the world. Between 1914 and the end of World War I, the U.S. Navy added nearly 80 vessels, mostly destroyers and submarines, and needed manpower to operate these ships. This poster is by James Henry Daugherty (1889–1974), a painter and illustrator who produced posters ...
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Library of Congress
Poster of a Coal Miner, Pennsylvania, 1937
This poster featuring the head and shoulders of a coal miner was made in 1937 for the Work Projects Administration (WPA) Federal Art Program in Pennsylvania. One of the New Deal programs launched by President Franklin D. Roosevelt to combat Depression-era unemployment, in 1936–43 the WPA supported the creation of more than 2,000 posters by well-known artists. Posters such as this one by Isadore Posoff were used to promote local tourism and to publicize a variety of programs from art to safety. Coal mining in Pennsylvania began in ...
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Library of Congress
Rural Pennsylvania
Katherine Milhous (1894–1977) was a newspaper illustrator and book designer of Pennsylvania Dutch heritage. She attended the Philadelphia Museum School of Industrial Art and the Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts. During the Depression of the 1930s, she was employed as an artist for the Work Projects Administration (WPA) Federal Art Program and produced a colorful series of posters representing rural Pennsylvania. One of the New Deal programs launched by President Franklin D. Roosevelt to combat unemployment, in 1936–43 the WPA supported the creation of more than 2,000 ...
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Library of Congress
Poster of an Amish Family, Pennsylvania
Katherine Milhous (1894–1977) was a newspaper illustrator and book designer of Pennsylvania Dutch heritage. She attended the Philadelphia Museum School of Industrial Art and the Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts. During the Depression of the 1930s, she was employed as an artist for the Work Projects Administration (WPA) Federal Art Program and produced a colorful series of posters representing rural Pennsylvania. One of the New Deal programs launched by President Franklin D. Roosevelt to combat unemployment, in 1936–43 the WPA supported the creation of more than 2,000 ...
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Library of Congress
Philadelphia. Old Swedes Church
This poster depicting the Old Swedes Church in Philadelphia was made for the Work Projects Administration (WPA) Federal Art Program in Pennsylvania. One of the New Deal programs launched by President Franklin D. Roosevelt to combat Depression-era unemployment, in 1936–43 the WPA supported the creation of more than 2,000 posters by well-known artists. These posters were used to promote local tourism and to publicize a variety of programs from art to safety. The colony of New Sweden was established in 1637 and came to encompass parts of Delaware ...
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Library of Congress