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35 results
Peddling. Selling Printed Cotton
This photograph is from the ethnographical part of Turkestan Album, a comprehensive visual survey of Central Asia undertaken after imperial Russia assumed control of the region in the 1860s. Commissioned by General Konstantin Petrovich von Kaufman (1818–82), the first governor-general of Russian Turkestan, the album is in four parts spanning six volumes: “Archaeological Part” (two volumes); “Ethnographic Part” (two volumes); “Trades Part” (one volume); and “Historical Part” (one volume). The principal compiler was Russian Orientalist Aleksandr L. Kun, who was assisted by Nikolai V. Bogaevskii. The album contains some ...
Contributed by
Library of Congress
Peddling. Selling Printed Cotton
This photograph is from the ethnographical part of Turkestan Album, a comprehensive visual survey of Central Asia undertaken after imperial Russia assumed control of the region in the 1860s. Commissioned by General Konstantin Petrovich von Kaufman (1818–82), the first governor-general of Russian Turkestan, the album is in four parts spanning six volumes: “Archaeological Part” (two volumes); “Ethnographic Part” (two volumes); “Trades Part” (one volume); and “Historical Part” (one volume). The principal compiler was Russian Orientalist Aleksandr L. Kun, who was assisted by Nikolai V. Bogaevskii. The album contains some ...
Contributed by
Library of Congress
Syr Darya Oblast. Interior of a Kyrgyz Tent
This photograph is from the ethnographical part of Turkestan Album, a comprehensive visual survey of Central Asia undertaken after imperial Russia assumed control of the region in the 1860s. Commissioned by General Konstantin Petrovich von Kaufman (1818–82), the first governor-general of Russian Turkestan, the album is in four parts spanning six volumes: “Archaeological Part” (two volumes); “Ethnographic Part” (two volumes); “Trades Part” (one volume); and “Historical Part” (one volume). The principal compiler was Russian Orientalist Aleksandr L. Kun, who was assisted by Nikolai V. Bogaevskii. The album contains some ...
Contributed by
Library of Congress
Zeravshan District. City of Samarkand. Selling Fabric in Covered Stalls
This photograph is from the ethnographical part of Turkestan Album, a comprehensive visual survey of Central Asia undertaken after imperial Russia assumed control of the region in the 1860s. Commissioned by General Konstantin Petrovich von Kaufman (1818–82), the first governor-general of Russian Turkestan, the album is in four parts spanning six volumes: “Archaeological Part” (two volumes); “Ethnographic Part” (two volumes); “Trades Part” (one volume); and “Historical Part” (one volume). The principal compiler was Russian Orientalist Aleksandr L. Kun, who was assisted by Nikolai V. Bogaevskii. The album contains some ...
Contributed by
Library of Congress
The Hidden Treasure on Arts and Crafts
Kitāb al-durr al-maknūn fī al-ṣanā’i‘ wa al-funūn (The hidden treasure on arts and crafts) is a compendium of several crafts and artisanal techniques by 19th century Lebanese author Jirjīs Ṭannūs ʻAwn. The book has nine chapters on different crafts: electroplating; the dyeing of fabric; photography; candle-making; and the manufacture of ink, glue, mirrors, ceramics, and soap. A tenth chapter discusses chemical compounds. Most of the book is devoted to three crafts: electroplating, including plating and galvanizing techniques involving copper, brass, gold, and silver; the dyeing of fabric, including natural ...
Contributed by
Qatar National Library
The Uganda Journal, Volume I, Number 1, January 1934
The Uganda Literary and Scientific Society was established at Entebbe, Uganda Protectorate, in 1923. Its main activity consisted of the reading of papers and the delivery of lectures on topics relating to Uganda. In 1933 the society moved its headquarters to Kampala and decided to issue a regular publication, The Uganda Journal. The journal’s declared aim was “to collect and publish information which may add to our knowledge of Uganda and to record that which in the course of time might be lost.” Four issues per year were published ...
Contributed by
National Library of Uganda
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Fabric Merchant. Samarkand
At the beginning of the 20th century, the Russian photographer Sergei Mikhailovich Prokudin-Gorskii (1863–1944) used a special color photography process to create a visual record of the Russian Empire. Some of Prokudin-Gorskii’s photographs date from about 1905, but the bulk of his work is from between 1909 and 1915, when, with the support of Tsar Nicholas II and the Ministry of Transportation, he undertook extended trips through many different parts of the empire.
Contributed by
Library of Congress
Antimens Sacramental Cloth from the Time of Empress Elizabeth Petrovna Kept in the City of Cherdyn Assumption Church
This photograph depicts an antimension (sacramental cloth) dating from the reign of Empress Elizabeth Petrovna (1742–61). The antimension (derived from the Greek for “in place of a table”) is an essential part of administering the Eucharist in the Orthodox liturgy and must be blessed by a bishop, whose property it remains. It indicates that the church is authorized to celebrate the Divine Liturgy, during which it is unfolded on the altar. As illustrated here, the square cloth usually contains images of the Descent from the Cross, the four Evangelists ...
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Library of Congress
Vessels and Vozdukhi Sacramental Cloth Cover from 1793. During the War They Were Buried in a Grave. Borodino
At the beginning of the 20th century, the Russian photographer Sergei Mikhailovich Prokudin-Gorskii (1863–1944) used a special color photography process to create a visual record of the Russian Empire. Some of Prokudin-Gorskii’s photographs date from about 1905, but the bulk of his work is from between 1909 and 1915, when, with the support of Tsar Nicholas II and the Ministry of Transportation, he undertook extended trips through many different parts of the empire.
Contributed by
Library of Congress
Vessels and Vozdukhi Sacramental Cloth Cover. A Gift from Alexander II to Borodino's Church. Borodino
At the beginning of the 20th century, the Russian photographer Sergei Mikhailovich Prokudin-Gorskii (1863–1944) used a special color photography process to create a visual record of the Russian Empire. Some of Prokudin-Gorskii’s photographs date from about 1905, but the bulk of his work is from between 1909 and 1915, when, with the support of Tsar Nicholas II and the Ministry of Transportation, he undertook extended trips through many different parts of the empire.
Contributed by
Library of Congress
Fabric Merchants in the Registan. Samarkand
Seen here are fabric vendors at their market stalls near Registan Square in Samarkand. The photograph seems overexposed, probably in an effort to capture detail in the stacks of colorful fabric in the shadowed area. In contrast to the fabric for sale, the long-sleeved robes of the turbaned men are a uniform dark gray, although the one on the right has a trim. Samarkand was for centuries known as an important point on major trade routes, and its population included several ethnic groups. Its commercial range expanded in the late ...
Contributed by
Library of Congress
Antimens Alter Table Cloth. Orsha Ascension Monastery Twenty-Two Versts from Tver
The Ascension Monastery at Orsha is located some 22 kilometers from Tver. Shown here are three antimensions (sacramental cloths) held at the monastery. The antimension (derived from the Greek for “in place of a table”) is an essential part of administering the Eucharist in the Orthodox liturgy and must be blessed by a bishop, whose property it remains. It indicates that the church is authorized to celebrate the Divine Liturgy, during which it is unfolded on the altar. The antimension usually contains images of the Descent from the Cross, the ...
Contributed by
Library of Congress
Palitsa with a Picture of the Holy Trinity. In the Vestry of the Ipatevskii Monastery. Kostroma
At the beginning of the 20th century, the Russian photographer Sergei Mikhailovich Prokudin-Gorskii (1863–1944) used a special color photography process to create a visual record of the Russian Empire. Some of Prokudin-Gorskii’s photographs date from about 1905, but the bulk of his work is from between 1909 and 1915, when, with the support of Tsar Nicholas II and the Ministry of Transportation, he undertook extended trips through many different parts of the empire.
Contributed by
Library of Congress
Palitsa with a Picture of Abraham and Sarah. In the Vestry of the Ipatevskii Monastery. Kostroma
At the beginning of the 20th century, the Russian photographer Sergei Mikhailovich Prokudin-Gorskii (1863–1944) used a special color photography process to create a visual record of the Russian Empire. Some of Prokudin-Gorskii’s photographs date from about 1905, but the bulk of his work is from between 1909 and 1915, when, with the support of Tsar Nicholas II and the Ministry of Transportation, he undertook extended trips through many different parts of the empire.
Contributed by
Library of Congress
Vozdukh Sacramental Cloth Cover with the Head of Adam. In the Vestry of Ipatevskii Monastery. Kostroma
At the beginning of the 20th century, the Russian photographer Sergei Mikhailovich Prokudin-Gorskii (1863–1944) used a special color photography process to create a visual record of the Russian Empire. Some of Prokudin-Gorskii’s photographs date from about 1905, but the bulk of his work is from between 1909 and 1915, when, with the support of Tsar Nicholas II and the Ministry of Transportation, he undertook extended trips through many different parts of the empire.
Contributed by
Library of Congress
Plashchanitsa (Shroud with the Image of Christ) from 1631. Dates to the Time of Tsar Mikhail Feodorovich. In the Vestry of the Assumption Cathedral in the Kremlin. Rostov Velikii
At the beginning of the 20th century, the Russian photographer Sergei Mikhailovich Prokudin-Gorskii (1863–1944) used a special color photography process to create a visual record of the Russian Empire. Some of Prokudin-Gorskii’s photographs date from about 1905, but the bulk of his work is from between 1909 and 1915, when, with the support of Tsar Nicholas II and the Ministry of Transportation, he undertook extended trips through many different parts of the empire.
Contributed by
Library of Congress
Vozdukhi Sacramental Cloth Cover from the Seventeenth Century, Embroidered in Silver. Museum Inventory Number 1923. In the Rostov Museum. Rostov Velikii
At the beginning of the 20th century, the Russian photographer Sergei Mikhailovich Prokudin-Gorskii (1863–1944) used a special color photography process to create a visual record of the Russian Empire. Some of Prokudin-Gorskii’s photographs date from about 1905, but the bulk of his work is from between 1909 and 1915, when, with the support of Tsar Nicholas II and the Ministry of Transportation, he undertook extended trips through many different parts of the empire.
Contributed by
Library of Congress
Church Cover for the Holy Eucharist, Embroidered with Gold on Velvet, from the Seventeenth Century. In the Rostov Museum. Rostov Velikii
At the beginning of the 20th century, the Russian photographer Sergei Mikhailovich Prokudin-Gorskii (1863–1944) used a special color photography process to create a visual record of the Russian Empire. Some of Prokudin-Gorskii’s photographs date from about 1905, but the bulk of his work is from between 1909 and 1915, when, with the support of Tsar Nicholas II and the Ministry of Transportation, he undertook extended trips through many different parts of the empire.
Contributed by
Library of Congress
Crimson Damask Ribbon, Embroidered with Gold, Depicting the Kazan Mother of God, Sewn with Gold. Vozdukh Sacramental Cloth Cover from Seventeenth Century. Museum Inventory Number 5578-1106. In the Rostov Museum. Rostov Velikii
At the beginning of the 20th century, the Russian photographer Sergei Mikhailovich Prokudin-Gorskii (1863–1944) used a special color photography process to create a visual record of the Russian Empire. Some of Prokudin-Gorskii’s photographs date from about 1905, but the bulk of his work is from between 1909 and 1915, when, with the support of Tsar Nicholas II and the Ministry of Transportation, he undertook extended trips through many different parts of the empire.
Contributed by
Library of Congress
Four People Seated on a Carpet, in Front of a Backdrop of Textiles
This photograph, taken in a yurt located near the Murgab Oasis in the region of Bayramaly (present-day Turkmenistan), shows a family of the Teke ethnic group. Seated in the center is the young married son of the family. The woman on the far right is presumably his mother, while his young wife is seated to the left. All of them are dressed in colorful festive attire. The wife wears profuse costume ornaments that indicate social status. In the background are richly patterned woven carpets. (The center of the front carpet ...
Contributed by
Library of Congress
Display of Embroidered Cloth and Woven Sashes
Torzhok is among the oldest settlements in central Russia. Referred to in written sources as early as 1139, it is situated on the Tvertsa River, some 60 kilometers to the west of Tver. Its favorable location made it a place of active commerce (the name Torzhok comes from the word for trading site). After the founding of Saint Petersburg in 1703, Torzhok saw a revival of its fortunes, as the town became a transfer point for supplies moving to the new imperial capital. By the turn of the 19th century ...
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Library of Congress