10 results
Spinner in Vivian Cotton Mills, Cherryville, North Carolina: Been at it Two Years. Where Will Her Good Looks Be in Ten Years?
This image of a young girl working in a North Carolina textile mill in the early 20th century is from the Records of the National Child Labor Committee (NCLC) at the Library of Congress. The photograph is attributed to Lewis W. Hine (1874-1940), one of the leading American documentary photographers of the Progressive Era. Best known for his photography of urban social conditions in New York City, Hine also investigated conditions at cotton mills across the Carolina Piedmont. Working with the Reverend Alfred E. Seddon and journalist A.H. Ulm ...
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Library of Congress
Luce Ben Aben School of Arab Embroidery I, Algiers, Algeria
This photochrome print of the interior of a school of embroidery in Algiers is part of “Views of People and Sites in Algeria” from the catalog of the Detroit Publishing Company (1905). In 1845 the Frenchwoman Eugénie Luce (1804–82) opened a school for Muslim girls in Algiers that was intended to educate local girls along European lines. She included teaching needlework in the curriculum, along with French and other subjects. In 1861 the French Algerian administration withdrew funding from the school. The emphasis of the school shifted from general ...
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Library of Congress
Luce Ben Aben School of Arab Embroidery II, Algiers, Algeria
This photochrome print of the interior of a school of embroidery in Algiers is part of “Views of People and Sites in Algeria” from the catalog of the Detroit Publishing Company (1905). In 1845 the Frenchwoman Eugénie Luce (1804–82) opened a school for Muslim girls in Algiers that was intended to educate local girls along European lines. She included teaching needlework in the curriculum, along with French and other subjects. In 1861 the French Algerian administration withdrew funding from the school. The emphasis of the school shifted from general ...
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Library of Congress
Weaver, Pasto Province
This watercolor by Manuel María Paz (1820-1902) depicts a colorfully clad woman as she weaves, probably making a poncho, as evidenced from the striped pattern and colors. Pasto Province (present-day Nariño Department) is in the southwestern-most part of Colombia. The watercolor is typical of Paz’s work, which captured the diversity of the population of Colombia and depicted the daily activities and traditional customs of the country’s different ethnic, racial, and social groups. Paz was born in Almaguer in the province of Cauca. He joined the Colombian army at ...
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National Library of Colombia
Women Spinning Wool, Pasto Province
This watercolor by Manuel María Paz (1820−1902) shows two Amerindian women in Pasto Province (present-day Nariño Department), in southwest Columbia. Sitting cross legged or on low stools, the women would have been spinning wool to make the warm clothing essential to survival in the high Andean mountains. The watercolor is typical of Paz’s work, which captured the diversity of the population of Colombia and depicted the daily activities and traditional customs of the country’s different ethnic, racial, and social groups. Paz was born in Almaguer in the ...
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National Library of Colombia
Woman Spinning Cotton, Túquerres Province
This watercolor by Manuel María Paz (1820−1902) shows a scene in Túquerres Province (present-day Nareño Department), southwest Colombia. A woman is spinning cotton, while a man in a poncho looks on. The local economy in this elevated region of the Andean cordillera was at this time mainly based on agriculture and the manufacture of cotton and wool textiles. The watercolor is typical of Paz’s work, which captured the diversity of the population of Colombia and depicted the daily activities and traditional customs of the country’s different ethnic ...
Contributed by
National Library of Colombia
Comlyville near Frankford, Philadelphia
This print, published by Louis A. Godey in the first volume of his Lady’s Book (one of the earliest successful women’s magazines in America), is a pastoral view with mill and factory buildings along Frankford Creek in Comlyville, near Philadelphia. It includes the mill, converted to a calico print works by Smith & Brother in 1827, the loom factory of "Mr. S. Steel," and the dye works of "Mr. Horrick," i.e., Jeremiah Horrocks. In the foreground, two horse-drawn wagons and a man travel on Asylum Road. Horses and ...
Contributed by
The Library Company of Philadelphia
Manayunk
This landscape print shows a couple walking along the bank of the Schuylkill River near the industrial village of Manayunk. A large tree stands in the foreground and small factories and dwellings are visible in the background. Also shown are groves of trees, rocks, and ground cover. Located along the east bank of the river, northwest of Philadelphia, Manayunk played an important part in the early industrial development of the United States. It was the site of large textile mills, which were built to take advantage of Manayunk’s plentiful ...
Contributed by
The Library Company of Philadelphia
Potter & Carmichael, Oil Cloth Manufacturers. Warehouse, Number 135, North Third Street, Philadelphia
William H. Rease, born in Pennsylvania circa 1818, was the most prolific lithographer of advertising prints in Philadelphia during the 1840s and 1850s. This advertisement shows the busy factory complex on Second Street above the Reading Railroad (i.e., 135 North Third Street above Race Street). A "Franklin-ville, Oilcloth Works" sign tops the roof of the main factory building around which workers stretch cloth on long flat racks. Cloth is also stretched down the sides of buildings. Other men move a roll of carpet into a hatch, load materials into ...
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The Library Company of Philadelphia
William H. Horstmann & Sons, Number 51, North Third Street, Philadelphia, Manufacturers and Importers of Military Goods
John Taylor French was born in Pennsylvania in 1822 and worked as a lithographer, particularly of fashion advertisements, in Philadelphia from about 1845 to 1852. This advertisement shows the ornately decorated storefront of William H. Horstmann & Sons clothing and military supply store. Patriotic bunting consisting of the names of J.H. Otten, carver, and J. Gibson, painter, and a shield surmounted by an eagle, flags, swords, and spears surround a sign that reads, "E Pluribus Unum, Horstmann," above the first level. Drums, military helmets, flags, and swords flank this central ...
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The Library Company of Philadelphia