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Bazaar of Isfahan
This photograph shows a part of the bazaar in Isfahan, Iran as it appeared in 1944. A bazaar is a marketplace or assemblage of shops where a wide variety of goods and services are displayed for trade. “Bazaar” is derived from the Persian word for “market,” and many believe that the bazaar is one of the most important landmarks of Persian civilization. Archaeologists have found evidence of bazaars in different parts of Iran, and scholars have concluded that the development of cities was based on not only a rising population ...
Contributed by
National Library and Archives of the Islamic Republic of Iran
A Miner and Shopkeeper, Province of Medellín
This watercolor by Henry Price (1819–63) shows a miner and a shopkeeper in the province of Medellín (present-day Antioquia Department), Colombia, completing a transaction. As in many of Price’s works, people of different ethnic origins and status in life are depicted. Price was a British painter and musician who was one of the draftsmen of the Comisión Corográfica (Chorographic Commission), a body tasked with studying the geography, natural resources, natural history, regional culture, and agriculture of the Republic of New Granada (present-day Colombia and Panama). He was born ...
Contributed by
National Library of Colombia
Liquor Shop in the Village of Lloró, Province of Chocó
This watercolor by Manuel María Paz (1820−1902) shows two men buying and consuming liquor at a shop in the village of Lloró. The drink most likely was locally made from cane sugar. Located in the Province of Chocó (present-day Department of Chocó) in western Colombia, the municipality of Lloró has the distinction of being the wettest place in the world, with an average annual rainfall of 13,300 millimeters. The watercolor is typical of Paz’s work, which captured the diversity of the population of New Granada and depicted ...
Contributed by
National Library of Colombia
Bowlby and Weaver's Hardware Store, Number 77, Market Street, Philadelphia
This print shows Bowlby & Weaver's Hardware Store, located at 77 Market Street (above Second Street) in Philadelphia. It was published in James Mease and Thomas Porter's Picture of Philadelphia from 1811 to 1831: Giving an Account of its Origin, Increase and Improvements in Arts, Sciences, Manufactures, Commerce and Revenue (Philadelphia, 1831). The illustration is by William L. Breton, a watercolorist and early lithographer of Philadelphia scenes, who was active in the city between about 1825 and 1855. Born in England circa 1773, Breton immigrated to Philadelphia around 1824. In the late 1820s, he contributed illustrations to Annals of Philadelphia, compiled by the antiquarian John F. Watson. In 1829 Breton entered the lithographic trade to execute the illustrations for the Annals. He worked extensively with the firm of Kennedy & Lucas, operated by David Kennedy and William B. Lucas, which produced Annals of Philadelphia. Breton also contributed to other publications at this time, including Mease and Porter's Picture of Philadelphia, also produced by Kennedy & Lucas, the first commercial lithographers in Philadelphia.
Contributed by
The Library Company of Philadelphia
Moss, Upholsterer, Number 127, Walnut Street, Philadelphia
This 1831 lithograph depicts the Moss upholstery shop, located at 127 Walnut Street (above Fourth Street) in Philadelphia. The signs beneath the two front windows of the shop advertise Venetian blinds and bedding. The print was published in James Mease and Thomas Porter's Picture of Philadelphia from 1811 to 1831: Giving an Account of its Origin, Increase and Improvements in Arts, Sciences, Manufactures, Commerce and Revenue (Philadelphia, 1831). The illustration is by William L. Breton, a watercolorist and early lithographer of Philadelphia scenes who was active in the city ...
Contributed by
The Library Company of Philadelphia
Loud and Brothers Piano Forte Manufacturers, Number 150, Chestnut Street, Philadelphia
This 1831 lithograph print shows the Loud & Brothers piano factory and shop, located at 150 Chestnut Street (above Sixth Street) in Philadelphia. Pianos can be seen through the window at the front of the shop. The print was published in James Mease and Thomas Porter's Picture of Philadelphia from 1811 to 1831: Giving an account of its Origin, Increase and Improvements in Arts, Sciences, Manufactures, Commerce and Revenue (Philadelphia, 1831). The illustration is by William L. Breton, a watercolorist and early lithographer of Philadelphia scenes who was active in the city between about 1825 and 1855. Born in England circa 1773, Breton immigrated to Philadelphia around 1824. In the late 1820s, he contributed illustrations to Annals of Philadelphia, compiled by the antiquarian John F. Watson. In 1829 Breton entered the lithographic trade to execute the illustrations for the Annals. He worked extensively with the firm of Kennedy & Lucas, operated by David Kennedy and William B. Lucas, which produced Annals of Philadelphia. Breton also contributed to other publications at this time, including Mease and Porter's Picture of Philadelphia, also produced by Kennedy & Lucas, the first commercial lithographers in Philadelphia.
Contributed by
The Library Company of Philadelphia
Philadelphia Citizen's Line of Steam Boats to New York and Baltimore
This lithograph of 1831 depicts the terminal of the Citizens Line of steamboats, located at the end of Arch Street on the Delaware River in Philadelphia. The steamboat is lying low in the river, and passengers are seen coming and going on Arch Street. The company office is in the left foreground. The print was published in James Mease and Thomas Porter's Picture of Philadelphia from 1811 to 1831: Giving an Account of its Origin, Increase and Improvements in Arts, Sciences, Manufactures, Commerce and Revenue (Philadelphia, 1831). The illustration ...
Contributed by
The Library Company of Philadelphia
Franklin Marble Mantel Manufactory, Race Street between 6th and 7th Street, Philadelphia
This lithograph of 1831 depicts the Franklin Marble Mantel Manufactory, located on Race Street between 6th and 7th Streets in Philadelphia. A sign on the facade of the building advertises “Marble Mantels, Tombs &c. neatly executed by Peter Fritz.” Workmen are seen on the sidewalk alongside the building while a clerk looks out the front door. The print was published in James Mease and Thomas Porter's Picture of Philadelphia from 1811 to 1831: Giving an Account of its Origin, Increase and Improvements in Arts, Sciences, Manufactures, Commerce and Revenue (Philadelphia, 1831). The illustration is by William L. Breton, a watercolorist and early lithographer of Philadelphia scenes, who was active in the city between about 1825 and 1855. Born in England circa 1773, Breton immigrated to Philadelphia around 1824. In the late 1820s, he contributed illustrations to Annals of Philadelphia, compiled by the antiquarian John F. Watson. In 1829 Breton entered the lithographic trade to execute the illustrations for the Annals. He worked extensively with the firm of Kennedy & Lucas, operated by David Kennedy and William B. Lucas, which produced Annals of Philadelphia. Breton also contributed to other publications at this time, including Mease and Porter's Picture of Philadelphia, also produced by Kennedy & Lucas, the first commercial lithographers in Philadelphia.
Contributed by
The Library Company of Philadelphia
Taylor and Teese, Saddlers, and A. R. Chambers, Currier, 67 and 69 Chestnut Street, Philadelphia
This lithographic advertisement shows the four-story adjacent storefronts for Andrew R. Chambers, leather dealer, and Taylor & Teese, saddlers, at 67−69 (now 223−25) Chestnut Street in Philadelphia. Signage for the businesses, the street numbers, and a drain pipe marked "1832" adorn the building. Merchandise fills the display windows of Taylor & Teese and the sidewalk in front of the store is piled up with a stack of trunks, a harness, saddles, and a feedbag. Rolled merchandise is also visible through the open doorway of Chambers. Taylor & Teese and Chambers were ...
Contributed by
The Library Company of Philadelphia
Philadelphia Arcade. Joseph L. Moore, Dealer in Fancy & Staple Dry Goods
This lithograph by George Lehman (circa 1800–70) shows the south front of the Philadelphia Arcade, which was designed by John Haviland and erected in 1826−27 on Chestnut Street between 5th and 6th Streets. Joseph L. Moore was a dealer in fancy and dry goods in New York, and this advertisement is for his Philadelphia branch, with a separate section for selling wholesale. The legend says that the store “is constantly receiving from New-York auctions every description of goods in his line which will be sold at very reduced ...
Contributed by
The Library Company of Philadelphia
Charles Egner Wine and Liquor Store, 10 North Third Street, Philadelphia
This lithographed advertisement shows the busy four-story storefront for Charles Egner Wine & Liquor Store. Two gentleman converse near a row of stacked barrels within the store and two workers hoist a barrel at the second entranceway. In front of the open cellar to the building, an employee rolls one of several barrels lined on the sidewalk. To the left of the worker, three barrels stand upright and a gentleman approaches. The illustration is by William L. Breton, a watercolorist and early lithographer of Philadelphia scenes who was active in the city between about 1825 and 1855. Born in England circa 1773, Breton immigrated to Philadelphia about 1824. In the late 1820s, he contributed illustrations to Annals of Philadelphia, compiled by the antiquarian John F. Watson. In 1829 Breton entered the lithographic trade to execute the illustrations for the Annals. He worked extensively with the firm of Kennedy & Lucas, operated by David Kennedy and William B. Lucas, which produced the first commercial lithographs in Philadelphia. This advertisement was printed in about 1837 by the partnership of Lehman & Duval.
Contributed by
The Library Company of Philadelphia
Charles Oakford's Hat and Cap Store, Wholesale and Retail, Number 104, Chestnut Street, Philadelphia
This print is an advertisement for the retail and wholesale hat store operated by Charles Oakford in Philadelphia. Oakford established his business in 1827, relocated to 104 Chestnut Street in 1843, where he began his wholesale trade in 1850, and operated from this address until 1852. The advertisement contains an exterior view of the store, surrounded by a decorative border comprised of hats and vignettes. The proprietor is seen standing behind the double-sided glass door of his establishment and displays of hats adorn the showcase windows of the store. The ...
Contributed by
The Library Company of Philadelphia
Conrad & Roberts Hardware & Cutlery, 123 North Third Street, Philadelphia
William H. Rease, born in Pennsylvania circa 1818, was the most prolific lithographer of advertising prints in Philadelphia during the 1840s and 1850s. Shown here is his advertisement for the Conrad & Roberts Hardware & Cutlery store on the 200 block of North Third Street. It shows the storefront adorned with signage. The store interior is visible through the two open entrances. A clerk retrieves merchandise from a shelf for a patron and another serves a gentleman at a counter. Laborers move barrels and boxes from the open cellar. Above the cellar ...
Contributed by
The Library Company of Philadelphia
S. Tobias, Importer & General Dealer in Wines, Liquors, Cordials and Syrups, Number 68, North Third Street, above Arch, Philadelphia
William H. Rease, born in Pennsylvania circa 1818, was the most prolific lithographer of advertising prints in Philadelphia during the 1840s and 1850s. His advertisement here shows the Tobias storefront adorned with signage on the 100 block of North Third Street. A patron enters one of the two open entryways at which a straw basket and wine cask are displayed across from a large cask-shaped sign, which reads "S. Tobias No. 68 Importer & Dealer in Wines Liquors Cordials and Syrups." At the other entryway, a laborer rolls a cask out ...
Contributed by
The Library Company of Philadelphia
Wetherill's White Lead, Red Lead, Chemical Glass, Drug & Dye Stuff Store. Old Stand 65 North Front Street East Side, Three Doors South of Arch Street
William H. Rease, born in Pennsylvania circa 1818, was the most prolific lithographer of advertising prints in Philadelphia during the 1840s and 1850s. This advertisement shows the storefront of Wetherill & Brother (John Price and Dr. William Wetherill) on Front Street above Market Street. Signs advertise the "Drug, Paint & Glass Store," proclaim the proprietors "Druggist & Color Men," and depict the store emblem of an American eagle with a shield atop a barrel, surrounded by apothecary packages and bordered by the text "Encourage your own Manufactory" and "65 Old Stand." Stacks of ...
Contributed by
The Library Company of Philadelphia
Newmarket Hardware, Cutlery and Nail Store
This 1846 print is an advertisement for the Newmarket Hardware, Cutlery and Nail Store in Philadelphia. Owned by Baxter & Brother, the store was  located at 244 South Second Street, later renumbered to 522 South Second Street following the consolidation of the city in 1854. Merchandise adorns the display windows of the shop and a clerk assisting a customer is visible through the doorway. A sign for "looking glasses," i.e., mirrors, and two teapots and an anvil hang above the open entrance door. In front of the store, crates, barrels ...
Contributed by
The Library Company of Philadelphia
Charles Gilbert's Stove Manufactory, 249 North Second Street, Philadelphia
William H. Rease, born in Pennsylvania circa 1818, was the most prolific lithographer of advertising prints in Philadelphia during the 1840s and 1850s. This advertisement shows the Gilbert stove factory covered in signage in German and English on the 400 block of North Second Street. Patrons enter the storefront and a clerk, or possibly the proprietor, greets a patron at a second entrance. Stoves line the walls and are displayed at the entrances and in the shop windows. The appliances, of various styles, including a cooking stove with a tea ...
Contributed by
The Library Company of Philadelphia
Lockwood and Smith, Importers and Dealers China, Glass and Queensware, 7 South Fourth Street, Philadelphia
William H. Rease, born in Pennsylvania circa 1818, was the most prolific lithographer of advertising prints in Philadelphia during the 1840s and 1850s. Shown here is his advertisement for the Lockwood & Smith business at 7 South Fourth Street between Market and Chestnut Streets. A clerk greets a male patron at one of the open entryways. Shelves of plates, bowls, and pitchers line the walls of the store. In the display windows, more china, glass, and queensware (cream-colored earthenware), including tureens and pitchers, are on view. On the sidewalk, clerks handle ...
Contributed by
The Library Company of Philadelphia
Moyer & Hazard, Successors of Alexander Fullerton, 174 Market Street, Fifth Door Above Fifth Street, Philadelphia. Elijah Bowen, Wholesale & Retail Hat & Cap Store, 176 Market Street, Philadelphia
William H. Rease, born in Pennsylvania circa 1818, was the most prolific lithographer of advertising prints in Philadelphia during the 1840s and 1850s. Shown here is his advertisement for the adjacent businesses of wholesale druggists Charles Moyer and A. Fullerton Hazard (successors of Alexander Fullerton), and wholesale and retail hatter, Elijah Bowen. Both buildings are covered in signage. The "Alexander Fullerton drugs medicine & paints" signs on number 174 indicate the recent shift in ownership. A man stands in the left doorway of 174 directing a laborer who moves goods on ...
Contributed by
The Library Company of Philadelphia
N. Helverson, Undertaker, 93 Coates Street, Philadelphia
William H. Rease, born in Pennsylvania circa 1818, was the most prolific lithographer of advertising prints in Philadelphia during the 1840s and 1850s. This advertisement shows the office building and storefront for the undertaker and "Coffin Ware-House" at 93 Coates Street (later 225−27 Fairmount Avenue). A male patron enters the doorway of the office "N. Helverson Undertaker." A sign advertising "Coffins Ready Made" adorns the showcase window. A doormat covers the small step preceding the entrance and the cellar doors to the building are open. In the right, a ...
Contributed by
The Library Company of Philadelphia
Robert Shoemaker's Wholesale and Retail Drugstore, Southwest Corner of Second and Green Streets, Philadelphia
William H. Rease, born in Pennsylvania circa 1818, was the most prolific lithographer of advertising prints in Philadelphia during the 1840s and 1850s. Shown here is Shoemaker’s drugstore on the 200 block of Green Street. Signs advertise Wetherill's white lead, drugs, medicines, paints, oils, glass, dyestuffs, "window glass of all sizes," picture glass, "cheap glass for hot beds," "white lead warranted pure by the ton or pound," ready-mixed paints, linseed oil, plasters, potash, and soda. A patron enters past barrels and sacks. Two clerks stand at the long ...
Contributed by
The Library Company of Philadelphia