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The Uganda Journal, Volume I, Number 1, January 1934
The Uganda Literary and Scientific Society was established at Entebbe, Uganda Protectorate, in 1923. Its main activity consisted of the reading of papers and the delivery of lectures on topics relating to Uganda. In 1933 the society moved its headquarters to Kampala and decided to issue a regular publication, The Uganda Journal. The journal’s declared aim was “to collect and publish information which may add to our knowledge of Uganda and to record that which in the course of time might be lost.” Four issues per year were published ...
Contributed by
National Library of Uganda
Steamer S. Salvador, São Francisco River
The Thereza Christina Maria collection is composed of 21,742 photos assembled by Emperor Pedro II (1825-91) throughout his life and donated by him to the National Library of Brazil. The collection covers a wide variety of subjects. It documents the achievements of Brazil and Brazilians in the 19th century and also includes many photographs of Europe, Africa, and North America. In 1868, photographer Augusto Riedel accompanied Luis Augusto, Duke of Saxe, son-in-law of Emperor Pedro II, on an expedition into the interior of Brazil. The expedition probably traveled by ...
Contributed by
National Library of Brazil
Helsingborg, Sweden
This photochrome print is from the “Views of Architecture and Other Sites in Copenhagen, Denmark” section of the catalog of the Detroit Publishing Company. It depicts a ship entering the harbor at Helsingborg, Sweden, which, between 1874 and 1896, was connected to Copenhagen by regular ferry service. The Detroit Photographic Company was launched as a photographic publishing firm in the late 1890s by Detroit businessman and publisher William A. Livingstone, Jr. and photographer and photo-publisher Edwin H. Husher. They obtained the exclusive rights to use the Swiss "Photochrom" process for ...
Contributed by
Library of Congress
River Steamboat "Okeehumkee" by Landing
The rivers and springs of Florida attracted tourists from the northern states of the United States, and from abroad, after the end of the Civil War. This image, from about 1886, shows the Okeehumkee, one of the Florida steamboats specially designed to navigate narrow, often shallow interior waterways to ferry tourists and merchants to cities and settlements away from the Atlantic and Gulf coasts. Vermont-born Hubbard L. Hart (1827–95) was an entrepreneur and developer of travel routes in Georgia and Florida who pioneered a line of Florida steamboats, which ...
Contributed by
State Library and Archives of Florida
Foreigners' Ship: Steamship
Commodore Matthew C. Perry entered the port of Yokohama in 1853 with an intimidating fleet of steam warships, in order to compel Japan to open up after nearly two centuries of restricted foreign contact. The Japanese people became increasingly exposed to Western culture as new trade agreements prompted cross-cultural interaction. The mixture of anxiety, curiosity, and awe at this influx of unfamiliar technology and customs is reflected in the detailed depictions of foreign subjects by ukiyo-e (pictures of the floating world) artists. With the arrival of Perry, Yokohama-e (pictures of ...
Contributed by
Library of Congress
On the Deckhouse of the Steamboat "Sheksna" of the Ministry of Communication and Transportation. Russian Empire
A major component of the Volga-Baltic Waterway (formerly called the Mariinsk Canal System), linking Saint Petersburg with the Volga River basin, is the Sheksna River, which drains the southeastern part of White Lake (Beloe ozero). The original length of the Sheksna was 395 kilometers, from White Lake to the Sheksna’s confluence with the Volga at the town of Rybinsk. The aptly named Sheksna was a small service steamer that belonged to the Ministry of Transportation. Seen in this 1909 photograph is a sailor giving a parting blast of the ...
Contributed by
Library of Congress
Steamer Tiumen of the Ministry of Communication and Transportation
At the beginning of the 20th century, the Russian photographer Sergei Mikhailovich Prokudin-Gorskii (1863–1944) used a special color photography process to create a visual record of the Russian Empire. Some of Prokudin-Gorskii’s photographs date from about 1905, but the bulk of his work is from between 1909 and 1915, when, with the support of Tsar Nicholas II and the Ministry of Transportation, he undertook extended trips through many different parts of the empire.
Contributed by
Library of Congress
View from the Dnieper River to Saint Andrew’s Mountains
This view of the Dnieper River is from Souvenir of Kiev, an early 20th-century album showing the main sites of Kiev, the capital of Ukraine and at that time one of the most important cities of the Russian Empire. Seen in the foreground is the paddle steamer Ratmir. Above the cultivated slopes of the Apothecary Garden is Saint Andrew’s Church, which sits on the spot where Andrew is said to have erected his cross. The baroque church, completed in 1754, was designed by the Italian-born architect Bartolomeo Rastrelli (circa ...
Contributed by
National Parliamentary Library of Ukraine
Nicholas Bridge
This view of the Nicholas Bridge across the Dnieper River is from Souvenir of Kiev, an early 20th-century album showing the main sites of Kiev, the capital of Ukraine and at that time one of the most important cities of the Russian Empire. The bridge was designed and constructed by a British engineer, Charles Vignoles (1793–1875). When it opened in 1853, it was the first permanent bridge over the Dnieper, the earliest multi-span suspension bridge in Europe, and at 692 meters long one of the largest architectural structures of ...
Contributed by
National Parliamentary Library of Ukraine
Philadelphia Citizen's Line of Steam Boats to New York and Baltimore
This lithograph of 1831 depicts the terminal of the Citizens Line of steamboats, located at the end of Arch Street on the Delaware River in Philadelphia. The steamboat is lying low in the river, and passengers are seen coming and going on Arch Street. The company office is in the left foreground. The print was published in James Mease and Thomas Porter's Picture of Philadelphia from 1811 to 1831: Giving an Account of its Origin, Increase and Improvements in Arts, Sciences, Manufactures, Commerce and Revenue (Philadelphia, 1831). The illustration ...
Contributed by
The Library Company of Philadelphia
Philadelphia from the Navy Yard
The shipyard at Front Street on the Delaware River in the Southwark section of Philadelphia became operational in 1776. In 1801 it became the Philadelphia Naval Shipyard and the first official base of the United States Navy. The larger ironclad warships introduced into the navy after the American Civil War required more space, and in 1871 the shipyard moved to League Island at the confluence of the Schuylkill and Delaware Rivers. This print by John Caspar Wild (circa 1804−46) shows the Delaware bustling with an assortment of vessels, including ...
Contributed by
The Library Company of Philadelphia
S.F. Jacoby and Company. Importers and Dealers in Foreign and Domestic Marble in All Their Varieties. J.K. and M. Freedley Dealers in American Marble
William H. Rease, born in Pennsylvania circa 1818, was the most prolific lithographer of advertising prints in Philadelphia during the 1840s and 1850s. This advertisement contains a montage of three titled views showing the sites involved in the operations of the Jacoby and Freedley companies. The scenes are separated and surrounded by an ornate border, comprised of patriotic imagery on top, including an eagle clutching the American flag and shield near a bust of George Washington and the state seals of Pennsylvania and Massachusetts. Filigree, foliage, and tassels decorate the ...
Contributed by
The Library Company of Philadelphia
Penn Steam Engine and Boiler Works. Foot of Palmer Street, Kensington, Philadelphia. Reaney, Neafie and Company Engineers, Machinists, Boiler Makers, Black Smiths and Founders
William H. Rease, born in Pennsylvania circa 1818, was the most prolific lithographer of advertising prints in Philadelphia during the 1840s and 1850s. This advertisement shows vessels docked in front of the engine and boiler works complex at the foot of Palmer Street on the busy Delaware River. Teams of several horses haul materials on trucks past the boiler works. Laborers work on the docks, piers, and boats at the complex. Docked vessels include the tugboats, steamboats, paddleboats, and a sailboat. The firm was established as Reaney, Neafie & Smith in ...
Contributed by
The Library Company of Philadelphia
A View of Point Airy Opposite South Street, Philadelphia
Louis (or Lewis) Haugg was born in 1827 in Germany, immigrated to the United States in 1847, and worked as a lithographic artist and printer in Philadelphia circa 1855−1900. This advertisement shows the Point Airy Hotel and dock operated by David Warren at the resort located on the southern end of Windmill Island, a summer resort area popular in the 19th century before the removal of the island in 1897 to allow passage for larger ships on the Delaware River. Trees surround the resort. In the foreground, a wide ...
Contributed by
The Library Company of Philadelphia
Conflagration of the Steam Boat New Jersey on the Delaware River Opposite Philadelphia, March 15, 1856, in Which 50 Persons Lost Their Lives
George G. Heiss was a mid-19th century Philadelphia lithographer, who specialized in views of fire-fighting equipment. This lithograph shows, in the distance under the winter night sky, clouds of smoke rising from the Philadelphia and Camden Ferry Company steamboat New Jersey as rowboats race to the wreck. In the right of the image, a partial view of the ferry Dido traveling to the rescue is visible. The New Jersey caught fire as the result of defective boilers while in mid-voyage to Camden from Philadelphia via an alternate elongated route necessitated ...
Contributed by
The Library Company of Philadelphia
View of Cincinnati, Ohio, Circa 1866
This panoramic photograph shows the city of Cincinnati, Ohio, as it appeared around 1866. Panoramic photography was developed in the mid-19th century, soon after the invention of photography, and was used to show wide overviews of cityscapes and landscapes. Making a panorama involved rotating a camera through successive exposures and then splicing the exposures together to produce a composite view. Some of the earliest panoramic photographs were made for the Union army during the Civil War to help military engineers analyze fortifications and terrain. Located on the north side of ...
Contributed by
Library of Congress
On the River Ganges - "Steamer Waiting"
This watercolor is from a collection of 18 paintings of Indian subjects by William Tayler (1808–92) dating from around 1842–45. Tayler was a civil servant of the East India Company who lived in India from 1829 until 1867. He became commissioner of Patna in 1855 and in 1857 was involved in the suppression of the Sepoy Rebellion. His measures against the local people were regarded as excessively harsh by his superiors, and he was suspended and given an appointment of lower rank. An enthusiastic amateur artist, Tayler sketched ...
Contributed by
Brown University Library