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Collection of Speeches and Latin Epistles by Renaissance Humanists
This manuscript, dating to the late-15th century, formerly belonged to the Sienese Alessandro Tegliacci, as stated in a note written on the initial page by an unknown later owner: "Dedit mihi Alex(ande)r Tegliaccius die(?) 8 decembris 1581 atque sua humanitate donavit" (Alessandro Tegliacci kindly gave this to me as a gift on December 8, 1581). The decoration on the same leaf bears the coat of arms of the Tegliacci family. Alessandro can perhaps be identified as the scholar who was called by Cosimo II to be professor of ...
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Municipal Library Intronati
Speech by the His Majesty Haile Selassie I, Emperor of Ethiopia, at the Assembly of the League of Nations, at the Session of June–July 1936
In the early 1930s, Italian dictator Benito Mussolini was determined to expand Italy’s African empire by annexing Ethiopia. In December 1934, a clash, provoked by the Italians, occurred between Italian and Ethiopian armed forces at Walwal on the Ethiopian side of the frontier with Italian Somaliland. Mussolini declared the incident “an act of self-defense” and thus not subject to arbitration under international agreements. Italy demanded compensation and formal recognition of the area as Italian. When Emperor Haile Selassie refused to yield to these demands, Italy began mobilizing its forces ...
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United Nations Office at Geneva Library
Speeches
Under the influence of Italian humanism and of his book-collector tutor János Vitéz, Archbishop of Esztergom, Matthias Corvinus of Hungary (1443–1490) developed a passion for books and learning. Elected king of Hungary in 1458 at the age of 14, Matthias won great acclaim for his battles against the Ottoman Turks and his patronage of learning and science. He created the Bibliotheca Corviniana, in its day one of Europe’s finest libraries. After his death, and especially after the conquest of Buda by the Turks in 1541, the library was ...
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Bavarian State Library
In Memoriam. An Address, on the Occasion of the Service in Memory of Queen Victoria, February 2, 1901
“In Memoriam” is an address delivered by Alfred R. Tucker (1849–1914), bishop of Uganda, in the Cathedral Church of Saint Paul, Mengo, Uganda, on February 2, 1901, on the occasion of the service in memory of Queen Victoria, who had died on January 22. Tucker thanked God for Victoria’s “life and noble example,” her “wise and sympathetic rule,” and “that high and holy courage with which she bore the burdens of state.” Victoria’s reign, he concluded, “will stand out as the brightest and most glorious page in ...
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National Library of Uganda
An Address in Memory of King Edward VII, May 20, 1910
This document is an address delivered by Alfred R. Tucker (1849–1914), bishop of Uganda, in the Cathedral Church of Saint Paul, Mengo, Uganda, on May 20, 1910, on the occasion of the service in memory of King Edward VII, who had died on May 6. Edward was born in 1841, and became king of Great Britain and Ireland in 1901, following the death of his mother, Queen Victoria. Tucker characterized Edward as “a Sovereign whose name I venture to think will go down to posterity as ‘Edward the Peacemaker ...
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National Library of Uganda
Gettysburg Address: Nicolay Copy, 1863
This document represents the earliest of the five known drafts of what is probably the most famous American speech. Delivered by President Abraham Lincoln in Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, at the dedication of a memorial cemetery on November 19, 1863, it is now familiarly known as “The Gettysburg Address.” Drawing inspiration from his favorite historical document, the Declaration of Independence, Lincoln equated the catastrophic suffering caused by the Civil War (1861–65) with the efforts of the American people to live up to the proposition that “all men are created equal.” This ...
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Library of Congress