7 results in English
Cherokee Phoenix, and Indians' Advocate, Volume 2, Number 46, March 3, 1830
The Cherokee Phoenix was the first Native American newspaper. The Cherokee syllabary, or alphabet, was invented by Cherokee silversmith Sequoyah (circa 1770−1843) and adopted by the tribal government in 1821. Four years later, the tribal government allocated $1,500 to produce a bilingual newspaper. The Cherokee Phoenix began publication at New Echota (near present-day Calhoun, Georgia) on February 21, 1828. Texts in Cherokee and English were printed side by side. The paper was edited by Cherokee schoolteacher Elias Boudinot (died 1839) with the assistance of missionary Samuel Worcester (1798 ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
A Fourth Day Morning View of Friends Meeting House on Cherry Street, Philadelphia
This print shows the Friends (Quaker) Meeting House on Cherry Street in Philadelphia. Quakers count Sunday as the first day of the week, so the reference in the title to the fourth day is to Wednesday. Members of the Hicksite congregation, including men, women, and children, are shown arriving at and leaving the church. Some of the women carry umbrellas. The caption at the bottom explains: “The Building which is about 42 feet front on Cherry Street by 100 feet deep was commenced on the 19th of the 11th month ...
Road to Philadelphy
This circa 1830 print by Edward Williams Clay (1799–1857) caricatures the pretentiousness and prejudice of early 19th-century Philadelphia Quakers toward people they regarded as their social inferiors, but it also mocks those seeking to imitate the Quaker elite. On a Philadelphia road in front of a small house with an open picket fence and a visitor arriving on horseback, a raggedly dressed, dark-skinned traveler with buck teeth, possibly an Irishman or African American, asks a rotund Quaker man and his daughter, "I say, this isn't the road to ...
Friends Asylum for the Insane near Frankford
This lithograph depicts the first private psychiatric hospital in the United States as it appeared in the early 1830s. Known as the Friends’ Asylum for the Insane, it was founded in 1813 by the Society of Friends (also called the Quakers) and opened to patients in 1817. The institution stood on land that formerly was a 52-acre farm in Oxford Township, near Frankford, six miles (10 kilometers) northeast of the center of Philadelphia. Shown here is an exterior view of the almshouse building as it appeared after two patient wings ...
Friends' Asylum for the Insane near Frankford
This circa 1836 lithograph depicts the first private psychiatric hospital in the United States. Known as the Friends’ Asylum for the Insane, it was founded in 1813 by the Society of Friends (also called the Quakers) and opened to patients in 1817. The institution stood on land that formerly was a 52-acre farm in Oxford Township, near Frankford, ten kilometers northeast of the center of Philadelphia. The view here, a pastoral scene with men standing in the foreground and animals grazing, is of the almshouse building as it appeared after ...
Doctor George Stuart's Botanical Syrup and Vegetable Pills, the Greatest Family Medicine in the World
This 1849 advertisement for “Dr. George Stuart's botanical syrup and vegetable pills, the greatest family medicine in the world” features an exterior view of the three-and-one-half story storefront of the Stuart establishment on the 700 block of Race Street in Philadelphia. Signage on the building north of the large central showcase window lists several diseases and ailments cured by "Dr. G. Stuart's Syrup and Vegetable Pills." The infirmities listed include consumption, dysentery, chills and fevers, piles, colds, coughs, bronchitis, cancers, erysipelas, neuralgia, and "general and nervous debility &c. &c." Shadowy views of branches, leaves, and decanters are visible in the showcase window. In front of the store, men of different ages, classes, and ethnicities hold banners inscribed with testimonials; ...
Friends' Alms-House
This print shows an exterior view of the front of the almshouse located on the south side of Walnut Street between 3rd and 4th Streets, Philadelphia. The building was constructed in 1745 by the Religious Society of Friends, the Protestant religious sect known as the Quakers, and it was taken down in 1841. It was intended to house destitute members of the Society of Friends and also sometimes admitted poverty-stricken people of other denominations. The print is by Thomas S. Sinclair (circa 1805–81), who was born in the Orkney ...