5 results in English
Third Series of Maxims, Number 16 / Bernard of Clairvaux. The External and Internal Composition of Man (Fragment) / David von Augsburg. Sermon against Jews, Pagans and Aryans / Quodvultdeus of Carthage (Pseudo-Augustin). Muspilli
The fragmentary Old High German poem “Muspilli,” on the fate of the soul after death, the Day of Judgment, and Armageddon, is written on blank leaves and in the margins of a manuscript of the pseudo-Augustinian sermon Sermo contra Judaeos, Paganos et Arianos (Sermon against Jews, Pagans and Aryans). The sermon itself was written in Salzburg in a fine Carolingian minuscule and bears a dedication in rustic capitals (folio 120 recto) from Adalram, archbishop of Salzburg from 821 to 836, to Ludwig, Duke of Bavaria (later King Louis the German ...
Contributed by Bavarian State Library
Victorius of Aquitaine. Martianus Capella. Remigius of Auxerre. Gregory the Great
This manuscript opens with a one-page text by Victorius of Aquitaine (fifth century). The rest of the work consists of two distinct parts. The first part, written in the second half of the 11th century, presents a work of Martianus Capella (fifth century) on the Seven Liberal Arts, followed by an important commentary on this text by Remigius of Auxerre (circa 841−908). A full-page pen drawing, which depicts numerous gods and demons of the ancient world, is situated between the text and the commentary. Because of its stylistic features ...
Contributed by Bavarian State Library
Homiliary on the Gospels (Numbers 1 to 20)
This manuscript of the homilies on the Gospels by Pope Gregory I (also known as Saint Gregory the Great, circa 540−604) was written in about 800 in the Alsatian monastery of Murbach, one of the most important cultural centers of the Carolingian Empire at that time. The monastery maintained a close relationship with the monasteries of Reichenau and Saint Gallen, located on Lake Constance, and their highly innovative scriptoria. The Carolingian minuscule in this manuscript bears some distinctive traits of the Alemannic script that was typically used in these ...
Contributed by Bavarian State Library
Various Writings by Othlo
This manuscript was written by the monk Otloh, or Othlo, of Saint Emmeram, a remarkable figure in 11th-century literature, and is comprised almost exclusively of his own works. Born around 1010 in the diocese of Freising, Bavaria, Otloh studied at Tegernsee Abbey. He took a great interest in the art of writing, in which he was self-taught. He became a well-known scribe of his time. In 1032, after a serious disagreement with the local provost, he left Tegernsee for the Benedictine Abbey of Saint Emmeram in Ratisbon (present-day Regensburg). Some ...
Contributed by Bavarian State Library
Homiliary on Gospels from Easter to first Sunday of Advent
This 10th-century manuscript from the Bergendal Collection at the Pontifical Institute of Medieval Studies in Toronto is the oldest extant copy of a book of homilies composed by Heiric (Eric) of Auxerre, France, around 865–870. Heiric, a Benedictine theologian and writer, was a monk at the Abbey of Saint-Germain d’Auxerre. He studied under Lupus of Ferrière, John Scotus Erigena, and Haymo of Auxerre. He was the teacher of Remigius of Auxerre and is an important representative of intellectual life in the Carolingian period. The manuscript was written, by ...