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11 results
Manayunk
This landscape print shows a couple walking along the bank of the Schuylkill River near the industrial village of Manayunk. A large tree stands in the foreground and small factories and dwellings are visible in the background. Also shown are groves of trees, rocks, and ground cover. Located along the east bank of the river, northwest of Philadelphia, Manayunk played an important part in the early industrial development of the United States. It was the site of large textile mills, which were built to take advantage of Manayunk’s plentiful ...
Contributed by
The Library Company of Philadelphia
Fairmount Waterworks. From the Forebay
This lithograph is a partial view of the Fairmount Waterworks, on the Schuylkill River in Philadelphia, one of America’s earliest municipal water-treatment systems. Powered consecutively by steam engines, waterwheels, and pumps that lifted water to reservoirs on a hill (Faire Mount), the waterworks and its beautiful setting were a tourist attraction from the beginning. They are seen here from the forebay, the reservoir from which the water was drawn to run the equipment. The plant was designed by Frederick Graff, and the result was an innovative engineering success and ...
Contributed by
The Library Company of Philadelphia
View of the Philadelphia Alms House: Blockley
This 1835 lithograph by George Lehman shows the Blockley Alms House in Philadelphia, as seen from Hyde Park on the east bank of the Schuylkill River. The view shows the riverbanks where two men fish and cows graze. A two-masted sailing ship passes by, with other ships on the river and the sprawling city stretched out in the background. William Strickland (1788–1854), a founder of Greek Revival architecture in the United States, designed the quadrangle of four large buildings that formed the almshouse. The original Philadelphia Alms House was ...
Contributed by
The Library Company of Philadelphia
Fairmount Waterworks. Pictorial Embellishment of the Philadelphia Saturday Courier
This lithograph of the Fairmount Waterworks, on the Schuylkill River in Philadelphia, shows one of America’s earliest municipal water-treatment systems. Powered consecutively by steam engines, waterwheels, and pumps that lifted water to reservoirs on a hill (Faire Mount), the waterworks and its beautiful setting were a tourist attraction from the beginning. The plant was designed by Frederick Graff, and the result was an innovative engineering success and beautiful buildings reflecting the contemporary fashion for Greek Revival architecture. This print is by John Caspar Wild (circa 1804-46) a Swiss-born artist ...
Contributed by
The Library Company of Philadelphia
Fairmount
This landscape view looking west from Reservoir Hill in Philadelphia shows the Fairmount Water Works, originally constructed between 1812 and 1822 after the designs of Philadelphia chief engineer Frederick Graff. Built to supply the expanding city with safe drinking water, the works included an engine house, mill house, and a millrace bridge. Visitors are seen strolling on the landscaped grounds of the works and rowers are visible on the nearby Schuylkill River. Also depicted are residences, probably including Lemon Hill, the Schuylkill Canal lock, and the river dam. The illustration ...
Contributed by
The Library Company of Philadelphia
View from the Inclined Plane, near Philadelphia
This circa 1840 print shows the view looking east down the inclined plane cut into Belmont Hill (Fairmount Park) for hauling railroad cars from the Schuylkill River in Philadelphia to Columbia on the Philadelphia and Columbia Railroad. Two men watch the cars being hauled by cables from within the plane. The covered Columbia Railroad Bridge over the Schuylkill, completed in 1834, is visible in the background. In the foreground is a heavily wooded landscape, with the cityscape in the distance. The plane connecting the river with the rail line was ...
Contributed by
The Library Company of Philadelphia
U.S. Naval Asylum
The main building of the U.S. Naval Asylum (Biddle Hall) was designed by William Strickland (1787–1854) in 1826 and completed in 1833. Strickland was one of the first architects of the Greek Revival style in the United States and also a civil engineer. The columns on the asylum’s balconies were an innovative use of cast-iron as a building material. The U.S. Navy commissioned the building to house officers and seamen who had been disabled on duty as well as elderly and impoverished naval personnel. This print ...
Contributed by
The Library Company of Philadelphia
S.F. Jacoby and Company. Importers and Dealers in Foreign and Domestic Marble in All Their Varieties. J.K. and M. Freedley Dealers in American Marble
William H. Rease, born in Pennsylvania circa 1818, was the most prolific lithographer of advertising prints in Philadelphia during the 1840s and 1850s. This advertisement contains a montage of three titled views showing the sites involved in the operations of the Jacoby and Freedley companies. The scenes are separated and surrounded by an ornate border, comprised of patriotic imagery on top, including an eagle clutching the American flag and shield near a bust of George Washington and the state seals of Pennsylvania and Massachusetts. Filigree, foliage, and tassels decorate the ...
Contributed by
The Library Company of Philadelphia
Alms House. Philadelphia
This 1840s print shows the Blockley Alms House in Philadelphia, as seen from the east bank of the Schuylkill River. It includes the Market Street Bridge, Beck’s shot tower (a city landmark since 1808) and, in the far distance, the Eastern State Penitentiary. William Strickland (1788–1854), a founder of Greek Revival architecture in the United States, designed the quadrangle of four large buildings that formed the almshouse. The original Philadelphia Alms House was constructed in the early 1730s and was the first multifunctional government-sponsored institution for the care ...
Contributed by
The Library Company of Philadelphia
Manayunk near Philadelphia
This lithograph shows the textile village of Manayunk along the east bank of the Schuylkill River, northwest of Philadelphia. The townscape includes Joseph Ripka's cotton mills, which were erected in 1831 and 1835 and were part of one of the largest textile businesses in the United States at the time. In the background is Flat Rock Turnpike Bridge, a long covered bridge that stood from 1810 to 1850. Manayunk’s plentiful water supply and good transport links made it important in the nation’s industrial revolution. The village was ...
Contributed by
The Library Company of Philadelphia
A Plan of the City and Environs of Philadelphia, 1777
This map of Philadelphia was published in London in 1777 by William Faden, successor to Thomas Jefferys as royal geographer to King George III. It is based on a 1752 map prepared by Nicholas Scull (circa 1687–1762) and George Heap (flourished 1715–60), updated with new details. An important addition to the 1777 map is the shading to indicate the expansion of the city from the waterfront along the Delaware River. One of the largest and most prosperous cities in mid-18th century British North America, Philadelphia was laid out ...
Contributed by
Library of Congress