17 results
Types of Nationalities in the Turkestan Krai. Sarts (Settled Inhabitants). Akhmed Khodzha
This photograph is from the ethnographical part of Turkestan Album, a comprehensive visual survey of Central Asia undertaken after imperial Russia assumed control of the region in the 1860s. Commissioned by General Konstantin Petrovich von Kaufman (1818–82), the first governor-general of Russian Turkestan, the album is in four parts spanning six volumes: “Archaeological Part” (two volumes); “Ethnographic Part” (two volumes); “Trades Part” (one volume); and “Historical Part” (one volume). The principal compiler was Russian Orientalist Aleksandr L. Kun, who was assisted by Nikolai V. Bogaevskii. The album contains some ...
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Types of Nationalities in the Turkestan Krai. Sarts (Settled Inhabitants). Yusuf Bai
This photograph is from the ethnographical part of Turkestan Album, a comprehensive visual survey of Central Asia undertaken after imperial Russia assumed control of the region in the 1860s. Commissioned by General Konstantin Petrovich von Kaufman (1818–82), the first governor-general of Russian Turkestan, the album is in four parts spanning six volumes: “Archaeological Part” (two volumes); “Ethnographic Part” (two volumes); “Trades Part” (one volume); and “Historical Part” (one volume). The principal compiler was Russian Orientalist Aleksandr L. Kun, who was assisted by Nikolai V. Bogaevskii. The album contains some ...
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Types of Nationalities in the Turkestan Krai. Sarts (Settled Inhabitants). Kabyl Bai
This photograph is from the ethnographical part of Turkestan Album, a comprehensive visual survey of Central Asia undertaken after imperial Russia assumed control of the region in the 1860s. Commissioned by General Konstantin Petrovich von Kaufman (1818–82), the first governor-general of Russian Turkestan, the album is in four parts spanning six volumes: “Archaeological Part” (two volumes); “Ethnographic Part” (two volumes); “Trades Part” (one volume); and “Historical Part” (one volume). The principal compiler was Russian Orientalist Aleksandr L. Kun, who was assisted by Nikolai V. Bogaevskii. The album contains some ...
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Sart Fields. Samarkand
Seen here are fields carefully cultivated by local inhabitants identified in the caption as Sarts. Sart was a term used in the early 1900s to refer not only to town dwellers but also to people who inhabited this area before the coming of Uzbek tribes in the 16th century. These fields were used for grains such as wheat, which flourished in the oasis setting of Samarkand, fed by the Zeravshan River that flows from the Pamir Mountains of Tajikistan. The terrain reflects ancient erosion patterns. The image is by Russian ...
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Sart House. Samarkand
The caption identifies this homestead as belonging to a Sart, a term used in the early 1900s to refer not only to town dwellers, but also to people who inhabited this area before the coming of Uzbek tribes in the 16th century. The structure has a mixture of elements, with traditional decoration along the cornice and a Russian pattern for the veranda railing. The attached building on the left reflects a simple Russian design with a pitched iron roof. The elevated plan took advantage of cooling breezes for the main ...
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Sart Schoolchildren. Samarkand
This winter photograph shows four Sart schoolchildren accompanied by an elder (probably a teacher). The children appear to be singing. The exposure times necessary for this photographic process would require that they hold the pose, including open mouths, for a few seconds. The group is seated against a backdrop formed by adobe walls, with two gnarled plane trees. The lattice windows of the back wall suggest a religious structure. The term “Sart” has various meanings and was used at the time to refer to town dwellers, as well as to ...
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Elderly Sart Man (Babaika, Samarkand)
This evocative winter view shows an elderly Babaika (Sart man) with a silver beard and white turban, framed by trees lined with fresh snow. The man is holding a brace of birds for a meal. The bright sunlight creates a shadow pattern throughout the photograph. In the left background is a shed wall made of mud applied to wattle latticework. (A roll of wattle is in the center.) The term “Sart” has various meanings and was used at the time to refer to town dwellers, as well as to people ...
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Sart Woman. Samarkand
This photograph shows a Sartianka (Sart woman) standing at the entrance to her dwelling. She is covered from head to foot with a hooded robe in strict observance of the practice of purdah (from the Persian for “curtain”). In certain Muslim cultures the isolation of women from the view of those outside the family is accepted practice. The robe has a trimmed opening with draw strings for the face (also veiled). The walls of the house are of mud over adobe brick, a readily available and practical building material for ...
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Sart Woman. Samarkand
This photograph shows a Sartianka (Sart woman) standing at the entrance to her dwelling. She is covered with a hooded robe in strict observance of the practice of purdah (Persian for “curtain”). In certain Muslim cultures the isolation of women from the view of those outside the family is accepted practice. The robe has a trimmed opening for the face (also veiled). Only the feet are visible, in leather boots. The walls of the house consist of mud over adobe brick, practical building materials in this hot, arid climate. Log ...
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Sart Types. Samarkand
Seen here are three generations of males identified in the photographer’s caption as “types of Sart.” The term “Sart” has various meanings and was used in the 19th century to refer to town dwellers, as well as to people who inhabited this area before the coming of Uzbek tribes in the 16th century. The grandfather, in the back, has a shaved skull and long beard. He is wearing a fine quilted coat lined on the interior with colorful fabric. On the left is the father of the two boys ...
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Sart House. Samarkand
The caption identifies this homestead as belonging to a Sart, a term used in the previous century to refer not only to town dwellers, but also to people who inhabited this area before the coming of Uzbek tribes in the 16th century. Built of stuccoed adobe brick, the main structure reflects Western forms with a simple portico of wooden columns supporting a loggia on the second floor. Attached structures lead into a courtyard, and a long masonry wall encloses a garden on the left. At the entrance to the dwelling ...
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Sart House. On the Outskirts of Samarkand
The caption identifies this house as belonging to a Sart, a term used in the previous century to refer to town dwellers, as well as to people who inhabited this area before the coming of Uzbek tribes in the 16th century. Built of stuccoed adobe brick, the structure has an extended porch with a cornice supported by wooden posts. The cornice shows a mixture of Western and local patterns, including a painted decorative band. At the center is an elevated section, or coffer, covered with painted figures. Of special interest ...
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In the Courtyard of a Sart Home. On the Outskirts of Samarkand
The caption identifies this house as belonging to a Sart, a term used in the previous century to refer to town dwellers, as well as to inhabitants of this area before the coming of Uzbek tribes in the 16th century. This courtyard view of a suburban villa shows elements of Western construction in the brickwork, the window design, and the roof cornice. Also prominent are traditional decorative elements, such as the wooden columns that support the cornice and the ceramic panels above the French doors. Although not identified, the owner ...
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Example of Mosaics on the Walls in the Home of a Wealthy Sart. On the Outskirts of Samarkand
According to the caption, this decorated interior is in a suburban house belonging to a wealthy Sart. In the late 19th century the term “Sart” referred not only to town dwellers, but also to the inhabitants of this area from before the coming of Uzbek tribes in the 16th century. The lavish decorative work displays floral bouquets, as well as botanical motifs and astral patterns formed by a complex system of intersecting lines. The owner of such a richly decorated house presumably belonged to a member of the local elite ...
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Sart House. Samarkand
At the beginning of the 20th century, the Russian photographer Sergei Mikhailovich Prokudin-Gorskii (1863–1944) used a special color photography process to create a visual record of the Russian Empire. Some of Prokudin-Gorskii’s photographs date from about 1905, but the bulk of his work is from between 1909 and 1915, when, with the support of Tsar Nicholas II and the Ministry of Transportation, he undertook extended trips through many different parts of the empire.
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In the Courtyard of a Sart Home. On the Outskirts of Samarkand
At the beginning of the 20th century, the Russian photographer Sergei Mikhailovich Prokudin-Gorskii (1863–1944) used a special color photography process to create a visual record of the Russian Empire. Some of Prokudin-Gorskii’s photographs date from about 1905, but the bulk of his work is from between 1909 and 1915, when, with the support of Tsar Nicholas II and the Ministry of Transportation, he undertook extended trips through many different parts of the empire.
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Sart Schoolchildren. Samarkand
At the beginning of the 20th century, the Russian photographer Sergei Mikhailovich Prokudin-Gorskii (1863–1944) used a special color photography process to create a visual record of the Russian Empire. Some of Prokudin-Gorskii’s photographs date from about 1905, but the bulk of his work is from between 1909 and 1915, when, with the support of Tsar Nicholas II and the Ministry of Transportation, he undertook extended trips through many different parts of the empire.
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Library of Congress