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Region Between Amazon River and São Paulo
This pen-and-ink watercolor map shows the course of the Amazon River, including its minor tributaries and the towns located along its banks. Although much of the area along the Amazon was controlled by indigenous people through the early colonial period, settlers established towns along the riverbanks to support trade and exploration into Brazil’s interior. The largest of these towns was Belem, which appears on the map.
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National Library of Brazil
Course of the São [Francisco] River and the Navigation Along It from São Paulo to the Pitangui Mines
This early-18th century manuscript map shows the São Francisco River in Brazil’s Minas Gerais state. In this period, the Portuguese sent numerous expeditions up the São Francisco and its tributaries in search of gold, silver, and diamonds.
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National Library of Brazil
Bom Jesus de Lapa
The Thereza Christina Maria collection is composed of 21,742 photos assembled by Emperor Pedro II (1825-91) throughout his life and donated by him to the National Library of Brazil. The collection covers a wide variety of subjects. It documents the achievements of Brazil and Brazilians in the 19th century and also includes many photographs of Europe, Africa, and North America. In 1868, photographer Augusto Riedel accompanied Luis Augusto, Duke of Saxe, son-in-law of Emperor Pedro II, on an expedition into the interior of Brazil. The expedition visited the sanctuary ...
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National Library of Brazil
Steamer S. Salvador, São Francisco River
The Thereza Christina Maria collection is composed of 21,742 photos assembled by Emperor Pedro II (1825-91) throughout his life and donated by him to the National Library of Brazil. The collection covers a wide variety of subjects. It documents the achievements of Brazil and Brazilians in the 19th century and also includes many photographs of Europe, Africa, and North America. In 1868, photographer Augusto Riedel accompanied Luis Augusto, Duke of Saxe, son-in-law of Emperor Pedro II, on an expedition into the interior of Brazil. The expedition probably traveled by ...
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National Library of Brazil
Brazil
This early map of Brazil is by Jacopo Gastaldi (circa 1500-circa 1565), a Piedmontese cartographer who worked in Venice and rose to the position of cosmographer of the Venetian Republic. Gastaldi produced maps and illustrations for parts of Delle Navigationi et Viaggi (Travels and voyages), a compilation of travel writings by the Venetian diplomat and geographer Giovanni Battista Ramusio (1485-1557). Ramusio’s work contained more than 50 memoirs, including the writings of Marco Polo.
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National Library of Brazil
Demonstration of the Tributaries of the São Francisco River, Minas Gerais
This hand-colored manuscript map, made by an unknown cartographer sometime in the early 18th century, shows the tributaries of the São Francisco River in Brazil’s Minas Gerais state. The São Francisco River system, which includes 168 tributaries, is the fourth-largest river system in South America. In the early 18th century, the Portuguese sent numerous expeditions up the São Francisco and its tributaries in search of gold, silver, and diamonds.
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National Library of Brazil
Demonstration of the São Francisco River in Minas Gerais
This hand-drawn map, made by an unknown cartographer sometime in the early 18th century, shows the São Francisco River in Brazil’s Minas Gerais state. In the early 18th century, the Portuguese sent numerous expeditions up the São Francisco and its tributaries in search of gold, silver, and diamonds.
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National Library of Brazil
Maps of the Border Region Between the States of Rio of Janeiro, Minas Gerais and São Paulo, and of the Course of the São Francisco River
This map shows an area near the end of the São Francisco River. The river originates in Brazil’s Minas Gerais state and travels some 3,160 kilometers to the Atlantic Ocean.
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National Library of Brazil
Map of the Region of Minas Gerais with a Part of the Way from São Paulo and of Rio de Janeiro to the Mines, Showing Tributaries of the São Francisco River
This map shows navigable routes to the mines of the southeastern Brazilian state of Minas Gerais. During the 18th century, when this map was drawn, the region’s gold and diamond mines attracted thousands of prospectors. The Portuguese crown financed the construction of a road through the mining regions, from Rio de Janeiro to the diamond center, Diamantina, and strictly controlled traffic on the road. The region was also accessible via the São Francisco River, which begins in Minas Gerais.
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National Library of Brazil