11 results in English
Central Panel of the Painted Cave of Gáldar
The Painted Cave of Gáldar is in northwest Gran Canaria, in the Canary Islands archipelago of Spain. It is part of a complex of pre-Hispanic caves that were rediscovered in 1862. Full archaeological excavations took place in 1987−2005. The six caves are carved out of the tufa and arranged around a central space. The first occupation of the settlement dates from the sixth century, but radiocarbon dating suggests that the cave acquired its current appearance in the late 12th century. The cave system was created by the Guanches, the ...
The Uganda Journal, Volume I, Number 1, January 1934
The Uganda Literary and Scientific Society was established at Entebbe, Uganda Protectorate, in 1923. Its main activity consisted of the reading of papers and the delivery of lectures on topics relating to Uganda. In 1933 the society moved its headquarters to Kampala and decided to issue a regular publication, The Uganda Journal. The journal’s declared aim was “to collect and publish information which may add to our knowledge of Uganda and to record that which in the course of time might be lost.” Four issues per year were published ...
Rock Painting S00176, Bethlehem, Dihlabeng District Municipality, Free State, South Africa
This San rock painting depicts an upside-down, plum-red antelope with a bleeding nose and, at the upper left, a smaller antelope painted in yellow, also bleeding from the nose. The upside-down posture and the nasal emanations both indicate death. For the San, this death was both literal and metaphoric. Metaphorically, death involved a shaman's passage to the Spirit World that was believed to exist behind the rock surface. The painting is from the eastern Free State of South Africa, which is noted for its depictions of upside-down antelope in ...
Rock Painting S00501, Bethlehem, Dihlabeng District Municipality, Free State
This San rock painting depicts red-colored rain-animals. Among all San groups, the most important ritual is the Great Dance in which, through trances, the San say that they harness a kind of spiritual power. They use this power for healing, hunting, removing societal tensions, making rain, and other tasks. Aspects of the Great Dance are pervasive in San rock art, in part because this dance was of such great significance to the San, but more importantly because the act of making rock art seems to have been part of the ...
Rock Painting S00568, Bethlehem, Dihlabeng District Municipality, Free State
This San rock painting shows rain-animals in upside-down posture, a familiar indication of death in the San culture. For the San, this death was both literal and metaphoric. Metaphorically, death involved a shaman's passage to the Spirit World that was believed to exist behind the rock surface. The painting is from the eastern Free State of South Africa, which is noted for its depictions of upside-down antelope in a variety of unusual contexts. The image of the painting is part of the Woodhouse Rock Art Collection of the Department ...
Rock Painting S00927, Clocolan, Dihlabeng District Municipality, Free State
This San rock painting shows a rain-animal in plum and white colors. San communities believed that rain-animals had to be captured and slaughtered by shamans in order to bring rain. The image of the painting is part of the Woodhouse Rock Art Collection of the Department of Library Services at the University of Pretoria. The collection includes more than 23,000 slides, maps, and tracings from a large number of rock art sites in South Africa. The San are hunter-gatherer people who lived throughout southern and eastern Africa for thousands ...
Rock Painting S01321, Ficksburg, Dihlabeng District Municipality, Free State
This red-and-black San rock-art image of people and a rain-animal depicts aspects of the Great Dance. Among all San groups, the most important ritual is the Great Dance in which, through trances, the San say they harness a kind of spiritual power. They use this power for healing, hunting, removing societal tensions, making rain, and other tasks. San communities also believed that rain-animals had to be captured and slaughtered by shamans in order to bring rain. The image of the painting is part of the Woodhouse Rock Art Collection of ...
Rock Painting S01392, Ficksburg, Dihlabeng District Municipality, Free State
This San rock painting depicts black-and-red colored magical objects, including rain-animals, such as snakes with animal heads, which are encountered by dancers in their out-of-body vision journeys that are part of the Great Dance. Among all San groups, the most important ritual is the Great Dance in which, through trances, the San say that they harness a kind of spiritual power. They use this power for healing, hunting, removing societal tensions, making rain, and other tasks. San communities also believed that rain-animals had to be captured and slaughtered by shamans ...
Erratic Stone, near the Town of Pandi, with Hieroglyphs made by the Indians, Province of Bogotá
This watercolor by Manuel María Paz (1820–1902) shows an unusual red-painted and inscribed rock in the province of Bogotá (present-day Cundinamarca Department), Colombia. The caption on the painting identifies the scene as that of an “erratic stone, located near the town of Pandi, close to another group, with hieroglyphs made by the Indians, all facing the Boquerón, from where the Sumapaz runs down to the Magdalena.” The monolith is one of the first recorded sites of rock art in Colombia, and the “hieroglyphs” are pictographs made by the local ...
Rocks with Hieroglyphics Made by the Indigenous People, Province of Bogotá
This watercolor by Manuel María Paz (1820–1902) depicts a rugged scene in the province of Bogotá (present-day Cundinamarca Department), Colombia. The caption on the painting identifies the scene as that of “stones with hieroglyphs made by the Indians, close to the Facatativá [River], facing the savannah of Bogotá.” The “hieroglyphs” are pictographs made by local people, probably in pre-colonial times. The watercolor is typical of Paz’s work, which captured the diversity of the population of Colombia and depicted the daily activities and traditional customs of the country’s ...
Group of Rocks with Hieroglyphs near Pandi, Province of Bogotá
This watercolor by Manuel María Paz (1820–1902) depicts a scene in the province of Bogotá (present-day Cundinamarca Department), Colombia. The caption on the painting identifies the subject as a “group of stones near the town of Pandi, with hieroglyphs made by the Indians, facing the Boqueron, close to the old lake of Fusagasuga, probably when the upper lake of Sumapaz fell, which led to the discovery of an underground river, on top of which sits the natural bridge of Icononzo. It could be said that the Indians wanted to ...