57 results in English
Ladva Station on the Murmansk Railroad. Unevenness of the Railway
At the beginning of the 20th century, the Russian photographer Sergei Mikhailovich Prokudin-Gorskii (1863–1944) used a special color photography process to create a visual record of the Russian Empire. Some of Prokudin-Gorskii’s photographs date from about 1905, but the bulk of his work is from between 1909 and 1915, when, with the support of Tsar Nicholas II and the Ministry of Transportation, he undertook extended trips through many different parts of the empire.
Contributed by Library of Congress
Petrozavodsk Station on the Olonetsk Railroad
Construction of a new railroad to the ice-free port of Murmansk lasted from 1914 to the spring of 1917, when it was connected to the capital, Petrograd. The caption for this image mistakenly identifies this structure as the Petrozavodsk station, which was along the route. In fact, it is one of the depot buildings at the Lodeinoe Pole station. Located on the Svir River and now a part of Leningrad oblast, Lodeinoe Pole was at the time of this photograph a part of Olenets Province. The Olenets Railway was a ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Curve, near the Petrozavodsk Station
Construction of a new railroad to the ice-free port of Murmansk lasted from 1914 to the spring of 1917, when it was connected to the capital, then called Petrograd. Although not completed in time to have a major impact on Russia’s efforts in the First World War, the northern part of the Murmansk Railroad (renamed the Kirov Railroad in 1935) was to prove immensely significant as a link for Lend-Lease shipments during World War II. Shown here is a curved grade cut through the rocky ground north of the ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Approach to the Railroad Bridge over the Lososinka River near the Petrozavodsk Station on the Murmansk Railway
The Murmansk Railroad was built by the Russian government during World War I to connect Petrograd (Saint Petersburg) to the ice-free port of Romanov-on-Murman (now Murmansk). Construction lasted from 1914 to the spring of 1917 when the line was completed. Shown here is track construction leading north to the bridge over the Lososinka River near the Petrozavodsk Station. This photograph reveals significant challenges in stabilizing the track bed over marshy terrain with uneven bedrock. The 25-kilometer Lososinka originates at Lososinskoe Lake and flows through Petrozavodsk, where it empties into Lake ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Railroad Bridge on the Murmansk Railway
The Murmansk Railroad was built by the Russian government during World War I to connect Petrograd (Saint Petersburg) to the ice-free port of Romanov-on-Murman (now Murmansk). Construction lasted from 1914 to the spring of 1917 when the line was completed. Shown here is the log house of a railway post near a road crossing in the vicinity of Petrozavodsk (in Karelia). A woman stands in front of a shed, next to which are log sections to be cut for firewood. The track takes a sharp curve (on right). A signal ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Petrozavodsk Station on the Murmansk Railway
The Murmansk Railroad was built by the Russian government during World War I to connect Petrograd (Saint Petersburg) to the ice-free port of Romanov-on-Murman (now Murmansk). Construction lasted from 1914 to the spring of 1917 when the line was completed. Shown here is the log house of a railway post near a road crossing in the vicinity of Petrozavodsk (in Karelia). A woman stands in front of a shed, next to which are log sections to be cut for firewood. The track takes a sharp curve (on right). A signal ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
On the Handcar outside Petrozavodsk on the Murmansk Railway
At the beginning of the 20th century, the Russian photographer Sergei Mikhailovich Prokudin-Gorskii (1863–1944) used a special color photography process to create a visual record of the Russian Empire. Some of Prokudin-Gorskii’s photographs date from about 1905, but the bulk of his work is from between 1909 and 1915, when, with the support of Tsar Nicholas II and the Ministry of Transportation, he undertook extended trips through many different parts of the empire.
Contributed by Library of Congress
Railroad Dam at the Lizhma Station
The Murmansk Railroad was built by the Russian government during World War I to connect Petrograd (Saint Petersburg) to the ice-free port of Romanov-on-Murman (now Murmansk). Construction lasted from 1914 to the spring of 1917 when the line was completed. This photograph shows the railroad track extending onto a jetty in Kondopoga Bay, part of Lake Onega (Karelia). The caption records the scene as taken at Lizhma Station (36 kilometers north of Kondopoga), but the site is in fact part of the town of Kondopoga. The wooden pier has been ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Barracks of the Austrian Prisoners of War near the Kannesemga (i.e., Kiappeselga) Station
The Murmansk Railroad was built by the Russian government during World War I to connect Petrograd (Saint Petersburg) to the ice-free port of Murmansk. Construction lasted from 1914 to the spring of 1917 when the line was completed. Because of a labor shortage caused by the war, German and Austrian prisoners were pressed into service on the project from 1915 to 1917, particularly on the 1,054-kilometer northern section from Petrozavodsk to the tip of the Kola Peninsula. This view shows the rail bed in the foreground, with barracks built ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
View of a Railroad near Kannesemga
The Murmansk Railroad was built by the Russian government during World War I to connect Petrograd (Saint Petersburg) to the ice-free port of Romanov-on-Murman (now Murmansk). Construction lasted from 1914 to the spring of 1917 when the line was completed. This view in a northerly direction shows part of the wooden railroad bridge over the Lizhma, a small river (not visible here) that empties into the northwestern part of Lake Onega. Major earthworks were required on both sides of the bridge to create the gradual approaches in this marshy, rocky ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Railway near the Village of Perguba
The Murmansk Railroad was built by the Russian government during World War I to connect Petrograd (Saint Petersburg) to the ice-free port of Romanov-on-Murman (now Murmansk). Construction lasted from 1914 to the spring of 1917 when the line was completed. Shown here is a section of track approaching the village of Kappeselga (in Karelia) from the south. This photograph reveals the extensive earthworks necessary in laying a rail line over marshy terrain with uneven bedrock. The marsh to the right of the track is clogged with birch saplings. Visible in ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
School in the Village of Perguba
The Murmansk Railroad was built by the Russian government during World War I to connect Petrograd (Saint Petersburg) to the ice-free port of Romanov-on-Murman (now Murmansk). Construction lasted from 1914 to the spring of 1917 when the line was completed. Shown here is the basic school at the village of Kappeselga (stated on the sign at left). Such schools were supported by the zemstvo, a form of local self-government established in Russia in 1864 as part of the “Great Reforms” of Alexander II. This school is a one-story log building ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
General View of a Railroad near the Village of Perguba
The Murmansk Railroad was built by the Russian government during World War I to connect Petrograd (Saint Petersburg) to the ice-free port of Romanov-on-Murman (now Murmansk). Construction lasted from 1914 to the spring of 1917 when the line was completed. Seen here is the track as it approaches the village of Kappeselga (in Karelia) from the south. This photograph shows the extensive earthworks required in laying a rail line over marshy, uneven terrain. On the right is a service building (perhaps a store) constructed of pine logs. Extending from the ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Excavation near the Village of Losos-Guba
The Murmansk Railroad was built by the Russian government during World War I to connect Petrograd (Saint Petersburg) to the ice-free port of Romanov-on-Murman (now Murmansk). Construction lasted from 1914 to the spring of 1917 when the line was completed. Building the rail line over marshy, uneven terrain required extensive engineering and major earthworks. Seen here is a narrow cut blasted through rock probably near the village of Kappeselga (in Karelia). Fragments of boulders still lie on either side of the log ties. Above on the right are pine stumps ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Village of Losos-Guba
During World War I, the Russian government built a new strategic railroad to connect Saint Petersburg to the ice-free port of Romanov-on-Murman (now Murmansk). The line was completed in the spring of 1917, too late to have a major effect on Russia’s efforts in World War I, but the Murmansk Railroad was to prove immensely significant during World War II as a link for shipments of Lend-Lease aid from the United States to the Soviet Union. The caption for this 1916 photograph is incorrect; Russian sources have identified the ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Village of Lovas-Guba on the Inlet of Onega Lake
During World War I, the Russian government built a new strategic railroad to connect Saint Petersburg to the ice-free port of Romanov-on-Murman (now Murmansk). The line was completed in the spring of 1917, too late to have a major effect on Russia’s efforts in World War I, but the Murmansk Railroad was to prove immensely significant during World War II as a link for shipments of Lend-Lease aid from the United States to the Soviet Union. An important point on the rail line was the Medvezh’ia Gora (Bear ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Railway near the Chernaia Station
The Murmansk Railroad was built by the Russian government during World War I to connect Petrograd (Saint Petersburg) to the ice-free port of Romanov-on-Murman (now Murmansk). Construction lasted from 1914 to the spring of 1917 when the line was completed. This photograph shows new track driven through a massive granite outcropping to the south of Maselskaia Station (north of Medvezhia Gora). Boulders have been gathered at the base of the cut (on right), while others are still strewn around the track. A locomotive, with tender stacked with firewood, is pulling ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Railway near the Chernaia Station
The Murmansk Railroad was built by the Russian government during World War I to connect Petrograd (Saint Petersburg) to the ice-free port of Romanov-on-Murman (now Murmansk). Construction lasted from 1914 to the spring of 1917 when the line was completed. This photograph shows new track driven through a massive granite outcropping to the south of Maselskaia Station (north of Medvezhia Gora). Boulders are strewn near the track through the narrow cut. A locomotive, with tender stacked with firewood, is pulling three passenger cars for railroad personnel. On the bank to ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Embankment near the Railroad Bridge across the Segezh River
The Murmansk Railroad was built by the Russian government during World War I to connect Petrograd (Saint Petersburg) to the ice-free port of Romanov-on-Murman (now Murmansk). Construction lasted from 1914 to the spring of 1917 when the line was completed. Seen here is the track curving to approach the wooden bridge over the Segezha River. The short Segezha flows 59 kilometers northeast from Lake Segozero to Lake Vygozero. Construction of the railroad through this marshy territory required extensive engineering and massive earthworks, particularly for the gradual approaches to elevated bridges ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Segezh Station. General View
The Murmansk Railroad was built by the Russian government during World War I to connect Petrograd (Saint Petersburg) to the ice-free port of Romanov-on-Murman (now Murmansk). Construction lasted from 1914 to the spring of 1917 when the line was completed. Seen in this photograph is a curve in the track at Maiguba Station, north of Segezha (Republic of Karelia). Granite boulders are strewn along the sides and in some cases appear to stabilize the track bed. In the foreground is a distance marker. On the right is a wooden bridge ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Railroad Dam in the Soroki Inlet
The Murmansk Railroad was built by the Russian government during World War I to connect Petrograd (Saint Petersburg) to the ice-free port of Romanov-on-Murman (now Murmansk). Construction lasted from 1914 to the spring of 1917 when the line was completed. Seen here is a railroad causeway and pier extending from Starchina Island, which was in fact a peninsula that formed part of the village of Soroka (now Belomorsk). Soroka was located on the estuary of the Lower Vyg River at its entrance to the Sorotskaia Inlet of Onega Bay. This ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Soroka Station
The Murmansk Railroad was built by the Russian government during World War I to connect Petrograd (Saint Petersburg) to the ice-free port of Romanov-on-Murman (now Murmansk). Construction lasted from 1914 to the spring of 1917 when the line was completed. The sign on the railway station in this photograph indicates Sorotskaia Guba (Sorotskaia Inlet), located near Starchina Island, a peninsula that formed part of the village of Soroka (now Belomorsk), on the White Sea. Seen here are the main track and a siding. On the left, a group of wooden ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Group of Railroad Construction Participants
The Murmansk Railroad was built by the Russian government during World War I to connect Petrograd (Saint Petersburg) to the ice-free port of Romanov-on-Murman (now Murmansk). Construction lasted from 1914 to the spring of 1917 when the line was completed. This photograph is identified as depicting a group of individuals involved in the construction of the railroad. They stand at a crude narrow gauge track laid in a cutting blasted through granite. Other photographs of the same men suggest that this site is near a rail pier extending from Popov ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Perm. Headquarters of the Ural Railway Administration
From 1909 to 1912, Russian photographer Sergei Mikhailovich Prokudin-Gorskii (1863–1944) made several trips to the territory around the Ural Mountains, where he photographed railroad installations, factories, and urban scenes. Shown in this 1909 photograph is the headquarters of the Urals Railway Administration in the city of Perm, built in 1888–92 to an eclectic style by I.A. Bykhovets. This imposing building is located next to the Perm I train station (the city’s oldest), completed in 1878 by Bykhovets, and partially visible on the left. The two buildings ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Steam Engine "Kompaund" with a Schmidt Super-Heater
From 1909 to 1912, Russian photographer Sergei Mikhailovich Prokudin-Gorskii (1863–1944) made several trips to the territory around the Ural Mountains, where he photographed railroad installations, factories, and urban scenes. Shown here is a Kompaund (Compound) steam locomotive of the Ab type, with a Schmidt superheater. The number between the coupler indicates Ab 132, produced at the Briansk locomotive factory in 1909—shortly before Prokudin-Gorskii took this photograph. These locomotives were among the most powerful produced in Russia in the early 20th century, with a top speed of 115 kilometers ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Zlatoust Station
At the beginning of the 20th century, the Russian photographer Sergei Mikhailovich Prokudin-Gorskii (1863–1944) used a special color photography process to create a visual record of the Russian Empire. Some of Prokudin-Gorskii’s photographs date from about 1905, but the bulk of his work is from between 1909 and 1915, when, with the support of Tsar Nicholas II and the Ministry of Transportation, he undertook extended trips through many different parts of the empire.
Contributed by Library of Congress
Excavation near the Mountain at Zlatoust Station
At the beginning of the 20th century, the Russian photographer Sergei Mikhailovich Prokudin-Gorskii (1863–1944) used a special color photography process to create a visual record of the Russian Empire. Some of Prokudin-Gorskii’s photographs date from about 1905, but the bulk of his work is from between 1909 and 1915, when, with the support of Tsar Nicholas II and the Ministry of Transportation, he undertook extended trips through many different parts of the empire.
Contributed by Library of Congress
Curve in the Railway at the Viazovaia Station
At the beginning of the 20th century, the Russian photographer Sergei Mikhailovich Prokudin-Gorskii (1863–1944) used a special color photography process to create a visual record of the Russian Empire. Some of Prokudin-Gorskii’s photographs date from about 1905, but the bulk of his work is from between 1909 and 1915, when, with the support of Tsar Nicholas II and the Ministry of Transportation, he undertook extended trips through many different parts of the empire.
Contributed by Library of Congress
View from the Rear Platform of the Simskaia Station of the Samara-Zlatoust Railway
At the beginning of the 20th century, the Russian photographer Sergei Mikhailovich Prokudin-Gorskii (1863–1944) used a special color photography process to create a visual record of the Russian Empire. Some of Prokudin-Gorskii’s photographs date from about 1905, but the bulk of his work is from between 1909 and 1915, when, with the support of Tsar Nicholas II and the Ministry of Transportation, he undertook extended trips through many different parts of the empire.
Contributed by Library of Congress
On the Sim River
At the beginning of the 20th century, the Russian photographer Sergei Mikhailovich Prokudin-Gorskii (1863–1944) used a special color photography process to create a visual record of the Russian Empire. Some of Prokudin-Gorskii’s photographs date from about 1905, but the bulk of his work is from between 1909 and 1915, when, with the support of Tsar Nicholas II and the Ministry of Transportation, he undertook extended trips through many different parts of the empire.
Contributed by Library of Congress
On the Way to Iurezan Bridge
At the beginning of the 20th century, the Russian photographer Sergei Mikhailovich Prokudin-Gorskii (1863–1944) used a special color photography process to create a visual record of the Russian Empire. Some of Prokudin-Gorskii’s photographs date from about 1905, but the bulk of his work is from between 1909 and 1915, when, with the support of Tsar Nicholas II and the Ministry of Transportation, he undertook extended trips through many different parts of the empire.
Contributed by Library of Congress
Excavation near Iurezan Bridge
At the beginning of the 20th century, the Russian photographer Sergei Mikhailovich Prokudin-Gorskii (1863–1944) used a special color photography process to create a visual record of the Russian Empire. Some of Prokudin-Gorskii’s photographs date from about 1905, but the bulk of his work is from between 1909 and 1915, when, with the support of Tsar Nicholas II and the Ministry of Transportation, he undertook extended trips through many different parts of the empire.
Contributed by Library of Congress
Railroad Curve near Ust-Katav
At the beginning of the 20th century, the Russian photographer Sergei Mikhailovich Prokudin-Gorskii (1863–1944) used a special color photography process to create a visual record of the Russian Empire. Some of Prokudin-Gorskii’s photographs date from about 1905, but the bulk of his work is from between 1909 and 1915, when, with the support of Tsar Nicholas II and the Ministry of Transportation, he undertook extended trips through many different parts of the empire.
Contributed by Library of Congress
Largest Excavation Pit in Ust-Katav
At the beginning of the 20th century, the Russian photographer Sergei Mikhailovich Prokudin-Gorskii (1863–1944) used a special color photography process to create a visual record of the Russian Empire. Some of Prokudin-Gorskii’s photographs date from about 1905, but the bulk of his work is from between 1909 and 1915, when, with the support of Tsar Nicholas II and the Ministry of Transportation, he undertook extended trips through many different parts of the empire.
Contributed by Library of Congress
Bashkir Switchman
At the beginning of the 20th century, the Russian photographer Sergei Mikhailovich Prokudin-Gorskii (1863–1944) used a special color photography process to create a visual record of the Russian Empire. Some of Prokudin-Gorskii’s photographs date from about 1905, but the bulk of his work is from between 1909 and 1915, when, with the support of Tsar Nicholas II and the Ministry of Transportation, he undertook extended trips through many different parts of the empire.
Contributed by Library of Congress
Cliffs on the Iurezan River near Ust-Katav
At the beginning of the 20th century, the Russian photographer Sergei Mikhailovich Prokudin-Gorskii (1863–1944) used a special color photography process to create a visual record of the Russian Empire. Some of Prokudin-Gorskii’s photographs date from about 1905, but the bulk of his work is from between 1909 and 1915, when, with the support of Tsar Nicholas II and the Ministry of Transportation, he undertook extended trips through many different parts of the empire.
Contributed by Library of Congress
Multicolored Clay Shales near Katav-Ivanovskii Plant
At the beginning of the 20th century, the Russian photographer Sergei Mikhailovich Prokudin-Gorskii (1863–1944) used a special color photography process to create a visual record of the Russian Empire. Some of Prokudin-Gorskii’s photographs date from about 1905, but the bulk of his work is from between 1909 and 1915, when, with the support of Tsar Nicholas II and the Ministry of Transportation, he undertook extended trips through many different parts of the empire.
Contributed by Library of Congress
Surface Layers near Katav-Ivanovskii Plant
At the beginning of the 20th century, the Russian photographer Sergei Mikhailovich Prokudin-Gorskii (1863–1944) used a special color photography process to create a visual record of the Russian Empire. Some of Prokudin-Gorskii’s photographs date from about 1905, but the bulk of his work is from between 1909 and 1915, when, with the support of Tsar Nicholas II and the Ministry of Transportation, he undertook extended trips through many different parts of the empire.
Contributed by Library of Congress
Surface Layers near Katav-Ivanovskii Plant
At the beginning of the 20th century, the Russian photographer Sergei Mikhailovich Prokudin-Gorskii (1863–1944) used a special color photography process to create a visual record of the Russian Empire. Some of Prokudin-Gorskii’s photographs date from about 1905, but the bulk of his work is from between 1909 and 1915, when, with the support of Tsar Nicholas II and the Ministry of Transportation, he undertook extended trips through many different parts of the empire.
Contributed by Library of Congress
Excavation near Katav-Ivanovskii Plant
At the beginning of the 20th century, the Russian photographer Sergei Mikhailovich Prokudin-Gorskii (1863–1944) used a special color photography process to create a visual record of the Russian Empire. Some of Prokudin-Gorskii’s photographs date from about 1905, but the bulk of his work is from between 1909 and 1915, when, with the support of Tsar Nicholas II and the Ministry of Transportation, he undertook extended trips through many different parts of the empire.
Contributed by Library of Congress
Excavation near Katav-Ivanovskii Plant
At the beginning of the 20th century, the Russian photographer Sergei Mikhailovich Prokudin-Gorskii (1863–1944) used a special color photography process to create a visual record of the Russian Empire. Some of Prokudin-Gorskii’s photographs date from about 1905, but the bulk of his work is from between 1909 and 1915, when, with the support of Tsar Nicholas II and the Ministry of Transportation, he undertook extended trips through many different parts of the empire.
Contributed by Library of Congress
Factory Pond. Satkinskii State Plant
At the beginning of the 20th century, the Russian photographer Sergei Mikhailovich Prokudin-Gorskii (1863–1944) used a special color photography process to create a visual record of the Russian Empire. Some of Prokudin-Gorskii’s photographs date from about 1905, but the bulk of his work is from between 1909 and 1915, when, with the support of Tsar Nicholas II and the Ministry of Transportation, he undertook extended trips through many different parts of the empire.
Contributed by Library of Congress