26 results in English
Russian Royal Family at Borodino, 1912
This photograph shows Tsar Nicholas II (1868−1918) and Tsarina Alexandra Fedorovna (1872−1918) with their daughters and other notables, walking on the train platform after arriving at Borodino Station on the occasion of the 100th anniversary of the Battle of Borodino. The second individual from the right is Baron Vladimir Borisovich Frederiks (1838−1927), a minister of the imperial court who was close to Nicholas II. During Napoleon’s invasion of Russia in 1812, Russian and French armies clashed on the Borodino battlefield, situated to the west of Moscow ...
Nova Friburgo Train Station
The Thereza Christina Maria collection is composed of 21,742 photos assembled by Emperor Pedro II (1825-91) throughout his life and donated by him to the National Library of Brazil. The collection covers a wide variety of subjects. It documents the achievements of Brazil and Brazilians in the 19th century and also includes many photographs of Europe, Africa, and North America. This photograph shows the train station at Nova Friburgo, which was part of the Cantagalo Railroad that linked the city of Porto das Caixas in Itaboraí state with the ...
Gare d'Auteuil
The Franco-Prussian War was brought about by rising tensions between France and Prussia in the 1860s. France, under Emperor Napoleon III, was determined to check the growth of Prussian power and avenge what it saw as a series of diplomatic humiliations. Prussia, under Chancellor Otto von Bismarck, believed that a Prussian-led war of the German states against France would be a decisive act leading to creation of a unified German empire. The conflict began on July 19, 1870, when France declared war. The French army proved woefully unprepared and suffered ...
Minas and Rio Railway, Brazil: Cruzeiro Station
The Minas and Rio Railway, also known as the Rio Verde Railway, was opened for traffic on July 14th, 1884, in the presence of Emperor Pedro II (1825–91), his daughter Princess Isabel, and her husband, Prince Gastão de Orléans, conde d’Eu. The British-owned and constructed line ran from Cruzeiro in the interior of the state of São Paulo, across the Mantiqueira Mountains, and through cities and towns in the southern part of the state of Minas Gerais as far as Três Corações do Rio Verde. The line played ...
Minas and Rio Railway, Brazil: Passa Quatro Station, at Kilometer 34
The Minas and Rio Railway, also known as the Rio Verde Railway, was opened for traffic on July 14th, 1884, in the presence of Emperor Pedro II (1825–91), his daughter Princess Isabel, and her husband, Prince Gastão de Orléans, conde d’Eu. The British-owned and constructed line ran from Cruzeiro in the interior of the state of São Paulo, across the Mantiqueira Mountains, and through cities and towns in the southern part of the state of Minas Gerais as far as Três Corações do Rio Verde. The line played ...
Paul Kruger Street, Pretoria, South Africa
This photograph shows Paul Kruger Street, looking south towards Pretoria Station, Pretoria, South Africa, as it appeared around 1910. The railroad station was the work of Sir Herbert Baker (1862-1946), a British-born architect who designed many important buildings in South Africa. The street was named in honor of Paul Kruger (1825-1904), the president of the South African Republic (Transvaal) who led the resistance of the Afrikaans-speaking Boers to Britain in the Boer War of 1899-1902. The photograph is from the Van der Waal Collection at the Department of Library Services ...
Pretoria Station, South Africa, 1893
This photograph shows the arrival of the first train at Pretoria Station, Pretoria, South Africa, in 1893. Railroad construction in South Africa was spurred by economic development associated with the gold mining industry, following the discovery of gold near present-day Johannesburg in 1886. Pretoria, at the time the capital of the South African Republic, was connected by rail to Cape Town in 1893, and to Durban and Lourenço Marques (in the then-Portuguese colony of Mozambique) in 1895. The photograph is from the Van der Waal Collection at the Department of ...
Ladva Station on the Murmansk Railroad. Unevenness of the Railway
At the beginning of the 20th century, the Russian photographer Sergei Mikhailovich Prokudin-Gorskii (1863–1944) used a special color photography process to create a visual record of the Russian Empire. Some of Prokudin-Gorskii’s photographs date from about 1905, but the bulk of his work is from between 1909 and 1915, when, with the support of Tsar Nicholas II and the Ministry of Transportation, he undertook extended trips through many different parts of the empire.
Contributed by Library of Congress
Petrozavodsk Station on the Olonetsk Railroad
Construction of a new railroad to the ice-free port of Murmansk lasted from 1914 to the spring of 1917, when it was connected to the capital, Petrograd. The caption for this image mistakenly identifies this structure as the Petrozavodsk station, which was along the route. In fact, it is one of the depot buildings at the Lodeinoe Pole station. Located on the Svir River and now a part of Leningrad oblast, Lodeinoe Pole was at the time of this photograph a part of Olenets Province. The Olenets Railway was a ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Petrozavodsk Station on the Murmansk Railway
The Murmansk Railroad was built by the Russian government during World War I to connect Petrograd (Saint Petersburg) to the ice-free port of Romanov-on-Murman (now Murmansk). Construction lasted from 1914 to the spring of 1917 when the line was completed. Shown here is the log house of a railway post near a road crossing in the vicinity of Petrozavodsk (in Karelia). A woman stands in front of a shed, next to which are log sections to be cut for firewood. The track takes a sharp curve (on right). A signal ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
General View of the Petrozavodsk Station on the Olenetsk Railroad
The Murmansk Railroad was built by the Russian government during World War I to connect Petrograd (Saint Petersburg) to the ice-free port of Romanov-on-Murman (now Murmansk). Construction lasted from 1914 to the spring of 1917 when the line was completed. Seen here is Golikovka Junction at Petrozavodsk (now capital of Karelia). The junction served as the boundary for the Olenets and Murmansk Railways. A line of flatbed cars extends along a siding whose hastily-laid track rises and dips on the soft ground. Barely visible to the left of the locomotive ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Railroad Depot at the Kannesemga (i.e., Kiappeselga) Station
The Murmansk Railroad was built by the Russian government during World War I to connect Petrograd (Saint Petersburg) to the ice-free port of Romanov-on-Murman (now Murmansk). Construction lasted from 1914 to the spring of 1917 when the line was completed. This photograph shows a rail siding leading to a large wooden maintenance building. The caption identifies the depot location as Kannesemga (corrected to Kiappeselga, 67 kilometers north of Kondopoga), but recent research suggests that the location is the former Kivach Station, just to the north of Kondopoga. The building is ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Segezh Station. General View
The Murmansk Railroad was built by the Russian government during World War I to connect Petrograd (Saint Petersburg) to the ice-free port of Romanov-on-Murman (now Murmansk). Construction lasted from 1914 to the spring of 1917 when the line was completed. Seen in this photograph is a curve in the track at Maiguba Station, north of Segezha (Republic of Karelia). Granite boulders are strewn along the sides and in some cases appear to stabilize the track bed. In the foreground is a distance marker. On the right is a wooden bridge ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Soroka Station
The Murmansk Railroad was built by the Russian government during World War I to connect Petrograd (Saint Petersburg) to the ice-free port of Romanov-on-Murman (now Murmansk). Construction lasted from 1914 to the spring of 1917 when the line was completed. The sign on the railway station in this photograph indicates Sorotskaia Guba (Sorotskaia Inlet), located near Starchina Island, a peninsula that formed part of the village of Soroka (now Belomorsk), on the White Sea. Seen here are the main track and a siding. On the left, a group of wooden ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Zlatoust Station
At the beginning of the 20th century, the Russian photographer Sergei Mikhailovich Prokudin-Gorskii (1863–1944) used a special color photography process to create a visual record of the Russian Empire. Some of Prokudin-Gorskii’s photographs date from about 1905, but the bulk of his work is from between 1909 and 1915, when, with the support of Tsar Nicholas II and the Ministry of Transportation, he undertook extended trips through many different parts of the empire.
Contributed by Library of Congress
View from the Rear Platform of the Simskaia Station of the Samara-Zlatoust Railway
At the beginning of the 20th century, the Russian photographer Sergei Mikhailovich Prokudin-Gorskii (1863–1944) used a special color photography process to create a visual record of the Russian Empire. Some of Prokudin-Gorskii’s photographs date from about 1905, but the bulk of his work is from between 1909 and 1915, when, with the support of Tsar Nicholas II and the Ministry of Transportation, he undertook extended trips through many different parts of the empire.
Contributed by Library of Congress
View of Borodino Station from Utitskaia Fortification. Borodino Battlefield
At the beginning of the 20th century, the Russian photographer Sergei Mikhailovich Prokudin-Gorskii (1863–1944) used a special color photography process to create a visual record of the Russian Empire. Some of Prokudin-Gorskii’s photographs date from about 1905, but the bulk of his work is from between 1909 and 1915, when, with the support of Tsar Nicholas II and the Ministry of Transportation, he undertook extended trips through many different parts of the empire.
Contributed by Library of Congress
Borodino Station
At the beginning of the 20th century, the Russian photographer Sergei Mikhailovich Prokudin-Gorskii (1863–1944) used a special color photography process to create a visual record of the Russian Empire. Some of Prokudin-Gorskii’s photographs date from about 1905, but the bulk of his work is from between 1909 and 1915, when, with the support of Tsar Nicholas II and the Ministry of Transportation, he undertook extended trips through many different parts of the empire.
Contributed by Library of Congress
Village of Farab, Turkmenistan. Railroad Station and Tracks
This photograph shows the train station in Farab, in the southern part of present-day Kazakhstan, near the border with Uzbekistan. The town of Farab is on the right bank of the Amu-Darya (Oxus) and on the Trans-Caspian Railway (also called the Central Asian Railway) that follows the path of the Silk Road through much of western Central Asia. The railway was built by the Russian Empire in the late 19th-century to facilitate its commercial and military expansion into Central Asia. The image is by Russian photographer Sergei Mikhailovich Prokudin-Gorskii (1863 ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
View of the Railroad, City of Vladimir, Kliazma River, and Water-Meadows
At the beginning of the 20th century, the Russian photographer Sergei Mikhailovich Prokudin-Gorskii (1863–1944) used a special color photography process to create a visual record of the Russian Empire. Some of Prokudin-Gorskii’s photographs date from about 1905, but the bulk of his work is from between 1909 and 1915, when, with the support of Tsar Nicholas II and the Ministry of Transportation, he undertook extended trips through many different parts of the empire.
Contributed by Library of Congress
Khrustalnaia Station on the Perm-Kungur Railroad
At the beginning of the 20th century, the Russian photographer Sergei Mikhailovich Prokudin-Gorskii (1863–1944) used a special color photography process to create a visual record of the Russian Empire. Some of Prokudin-Gorskii’s photographs date from about 1905, but the bulk of his work is from between 1909 and 1915, when, with the support of Tsar Nicholas II and the Ministry of Transportation, he undertook extended trips through many different parts of the empire.
Contributed by Library of Congress
Railroad Station with Water Crane and Tracks
At the beginning of the 20th century, the Russian photographer Sergei Mikhailovich Prokudin-Gorskii (1863–1944) used a special color photography process to create a visual record of the Russian Empire. Some of Prokudin-Gorskii’s photographs date from about 1905, but the bulk of his work is from between 1909 and 1915, when, with the support of Tsar Nicholas II and the Ministry of Transportation, he undertook extended trips through many different parts of the empire.
Contributed by Library of Congress
Souvenir of Kiev
Souvenir of Kiev is an early 20th-century album of 25 views of Kiev, the capital of Ukraine and at that time one of the most important cities of the Russian Empire. Among the sites shown are cathedrals, monasteries, monuments, educational and cultural institutions, squares, thoroughfares, the railroad station, bridges across the Dnieper River, and buildings connected with the commercial life of the city. The views in the album are collotypes, made using a chemically-based printing process that was widely employed before the invention of offset lithography. The captions on each ...
Railroad Station
This view of the first railroad station in Kiev is from Souvenir of Kiev, an early 20th-century album showing the main sites of Kiev, the capital of Ukraine and at that time one of the most important cities of the Russian Empire. The station was designed in the old English gothic style by architect Vishnevsky and completed in 1870. It serviced two rail lines, the Kiev–Balta and Kursk–Kiev routes, also completed in 1870. The station was located in the valley of the Lybid River (a tributary of the ...
Railway Depot at Philadelphia
This lithograph of 1832 shows the depot of the Philadelphia, Germantown, and Norristown Rail Road Company, located at the junction of Green and Ninth Streets, Philadelphia. In the foreground is a locomotive, which is seen pulling passenger cars. The Philadelphia, Germantown, and Norristown Rail Road Company was incorporated on February 17, 1831, under a charter enacted by the Pennsylvania legislature. Rails were laid between Philadelphia and Germantown and the line was opened on June 6, 1832. The first trains were drawn by horses and covered the six miles (9.66 ...
Minas and Rio Railway, Brazil, between 1881 and 1884
The Minas and Rio Railway, also known as the Rio Verde Railway, was opened for traffic on July 14th, 1884, in the presence of Emperor Pedro II (1825–91), his daughter Princess Isabel, and her husband, Prince Gastão de Orléans, conde d’Eu. The British-owned and constructed line ran from Cruzeiro in the interior of the state of São Paulo, across the Mantiqueira Mountains, and through cities and towns in the southern part of the state of Minas Gerais as far as Três Corações do Rio Verde. The line played ...