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Cole Bros. Circus
This 1935 image presents a scene from a typical moderate-sized 20th-century American circus. A crowd watches as baggage wagons from the Cole Bros. Circus are being pulled over flatcars. The railcars are marked Clyde Beatty and Allen King, who were two of the more notable animal trainers of the period. Behind the flatcars are stock cars that held elephants and baggage horses. This scene was repeated daily, morning and night, in railroad yards in communities across the United States. Cole Bros. Circus was established in 1884 by William Washington Cole ...
Contributed by
Circus World Museum
Russian Royal Family at Borodino, 1912
This photograph shows Tsar Nicholas II (1868−1918) and Tsarina Alexandra Fedorovna (1872−1918) with their daughters and other notables, walking on the train platform after arriving at Borodino Station on the occasion of the 100th anniversary of the Battle of Borodino. The second individual from the right is Baron Vladimir Borisovich Frederiks (1838−1927), a minister of the imperial court who was close to Nicholas II. During Napoleon’s invasion of Russia in 1812, Russian and French armies clashed on the Borodino battlefield, situated to the west of Moscow ...
Contributed by
Boris Yeltsin Presidential Library
Rescue Train Swept off the Tracks by the 1935 Labor Day Hurricane
On September 2, 1935, a powerful hurricane slammed into the middle Florida Keys. Known as the Labor Day Hurricane, it was the first Category 5 storm to strike the United States in recorded history. The hurricane claimed at least 485 lives, including about 260 World War I veterans working on a section of the Overseas Highway in a federal relief project. The veterans came from the ranks of the Bonus Army, a group of soldiers who camped at the steps of the U.S. Capitol in the early 1930s to ...
Contributed by
State Library and Archives of Florida
Third Class Carriage, Sultan's Railway, Syria
Railway construction in the Ottoman Empire began in the mid-19th century, generally with European financing and supervision in the context of Great Power rivalry. By the early 20th century, railways had become a major mode of transportation in the Near East. This stereo-view image from around 1908 depicts men seated in a railroad car, some wearing traditional dress, others in Western dress with fezzes. The producer of the image was the Stereo Travel Company of Corona, Long Island, New York, a small firm active in the early years of the ...
Contributed by
Library of Congress
Railroad Bridge over the Shuia River
The Murmansk Railroad was built by the Russian government during World War I to connect Petrograd (Saint Petersburg) to the ice-free port of Romanov-on-Murman (now Murmansk). Construction lasted from 1914 to the spring of 1917 when the line was completed. Seen here is a train on a wooden railroad bridge over the Shuia River to the north of Petrozavodsk. This shallow river originates in Lake Suojärvi in Karelia and flows 194 kilometers to Petrozavodsk Bay (part of Lake Onega). The log buttresses of the bridge are protected from potentially damaging ...
Contributed by
Library of Congress
Railroad Depot at the Kannesemga (i.e., Kiappeselga) Station
The Murmansk Railroad was built by the Russian government during World War I to connect Petrograd (Saint Petersburg) to the ice-free port of Romanov-on-Murman (now Murmansk). Construction lasted from 1914 to the spring of 1917 when the line was completed. This photograph shows a rail siding leading to a large wooden maintenance building. The caption identifies the depot location as Kannesemga (corrected to Kiappeselga, 67 kilometers north of Kondopoga), but recent research suggests that the location is the former Kivach Station, just to the north of Kondopoga. The building is ...
Contributed by
Library of Congress
Excavation near the Village of Losos-Guba
The Murmansk Railroad was built by the Russian government during World War I to connect Petrograd (Saint Petersburg) to the ice-free port of Romanov-on-Murman (now Murmansk). Construction lasted from 1914 to the spring of 1917 when the line was completed. Building the rail line over marshy, uneven terrain required extensive engineering and major earthworks. Seen here is a narrow cut blasted through rock probably near the village of Kappeselga (in Karelia). Fragments of boulders still lie on either side of the log ties. Above on the right are pine stumps ...
Contributed by
Library of Congress
Quarry near Segezh Station
The Murmansk Railroad was built by the Russian government during World War I to connect Petrograd (Saint Petersburg) to the ice-free port of Romanov-on-Murman (now Murmansk). Construction lasted from 1914 to the spring of 1917 when the line was completed. This photograph shows a railroad spur in a sand quarry probably located between Makselskaia and Segezha (to the north of Medvezhia Gora in Karelia). Construction of the railroad through this marshy, uneven territory required enormous amounts of ballast. On the track are several flatbed cars filled with sand. The low ...
Contributed by
Library of Congress
Kirosskii Quarry
The Murmansk Railroad was built by the Russian government during World War I to connect Petrograd (Saint Petersburg) to the ice-free port of Romanov-on-Murman (now Murmansk). Construction lasted from 1914 to the spring of 1917 when the line was completed. The caption in the photographer’s album of contact prints identifies this view as Kirosskii Quarry. The album captions are often inaccurate, but this may have been taken in Kirasozero (Kiras Lake) to the west of Segezha and Maiguba. Construction of the railroad through this marshy territory required enormous amounts ...
Contributed by
Library of Congress
Railroad Bridge across the Onda River
The Murmansk Railroad was built by the Russian government during World War I to connect Petrograd (Saint Petersburg) to the ice-free port of Romanov-on-Murman (now Murmansk). Construction lasted from 1914 to the spring of 1917 when the line was completed. Seen here is the wooden railroad bridge over the Kem River near its mouth at the Kem Bay in the White Sea. The bridge makes use of wooden components produced from the ample supply of timber from the forests of the region. These wooden components display great ingenuity, particularly in ...
Contributed by
Library of Congress
Railroad Dam in the Soroki Inlet
The Murmansk Railroad was built by the Russian government during World War I to connect Petrograd (Saint Petersburg) to the ice-free port of Romanov-on-Murman (now Murmansk). Construction lasted from 1914 to the spring of 1917 when the line was completed. Seen here is a railroad causeway and pier extending from Starchina Island, which was in fact a peninsula that formed part of the village of Soroka (now Belomorsk). Soroka was located on the estuary of the Lower Vyg River at its entrance to the Sorotskaia Inlet of Onega Bay. This ...
Contributed by
Library of Congress
Steam Engine "Kompaund" with a Schmidt Super-Heater
From 1909 to 1912, Russian photographer Sergei Mikhailovich Prokudin-Gorskii (1863–1944) made several trips to the territory around the Ural Mountains, where he photographed railroad installations, factories, and urban scenes. Shown here is a Kompaund (Compound) steam locomotive of the Ab type, with a Schmidt superheater. The number between the coupler indicates Ab 132, produced at the Briansk locomotive factory in 1909—shortly before Prokudin-Gorskii took this photograph. These locomotives were among the most powerful produced in Russia in the early 20th century, with a top speed of 115 kilometers ...
Contributed by
Library of Congress
Zlatoust Station
At the beginning of the 20th century, the Russian photographer Sergei Mikhailovich Prokudin-Gorskii (1863–1944) used a special color photography process to create a visual record of the Russian Empire. Some of Prokudin-Gorskii’s photographs date from about 1905, but the bulk of his work is from between 1909 and 1915, when, with the support of Tsar Nicholas II and the Ministry of Transportation, he undertook extended trips through many different parts of the empire.
Contributed by
Library of Congress
Borodino Station
At the beginning of the 20th century, the Russian photographer Sergei Mikhailovich Prokudin-Gorskii (1863–1944) used a special color photography process to create a visual record of the Russian Empire. Some of Prokudin-Gorskii’s photographs date from about 1905, but the bulk of his work is from between 1909 and 1915, when, with the support of Tsar Nicholas II and the Ministry of Transportation, he undertook extended trips through many different parts of the empire.
Contributed by
Library of Congress
Khrustalnaia Station on the Perm-Kungur Railroad
At the beginning of the 20th century, the Russian photographer Sergei Mikhailovich Prokudin-Gorskii (1863–1944) used a special color photography process to create a visual record of the Russian Empire. Some of Prokudin-Gorskii’s photographs date from about 1905, but the bulk of his work is from between 1909 and 1915, when, with the support of Tsar Nicholas II and the Ministry of Transportation, he undertook extended trips through many different parts of the empire.
Contributed by
Library of Congress
Railroad Tracks and Cars in Front of a Factory
At the beginning of the 20th century, the Russian photographer Sergei Mikhailovich Prokudin-Gorskii (1863–1944) used a special color photography process to create a visual record of the Russian Empire. Some of Prokudin-Gorskii’s photographs date from about 1905, but the bulk of his work is from between 1909 and 1915, when, with the support of Tsar Nicholas II and the Ministry of Transportation, he undertook extended trips through many different parts of the empire.
Contributed by
Library of Congress
Railway Depot at Philadelphia
This lithograph of 1832 shows the depot of the Philadelphia, Germantown, and Norristown Rail Road Company, located at the junction of Green and Ninth Streets, Philadelphia. In the foreground is a locomotive, which is seen pulling passenger cars. The Philadelphia, Germantown, and Norristown Rail Road Company was incorporated on February 17, 1831, under a charter enacted by the Pennsylvania legislature. Rails were laid between Philadelphia and Germantown and the line was opened on June 6, 1832. The first trains were drawn by horses and covered the six miles (9.66 ...
Contributed by
The Library Company of Philadelphia
View of the Philadelphia Volunteer Refreshment Saloons
This Civil War souvenir print contains six views of the Union Volunteer Refreshment Saloon and of the Cooper Shop Volunteer Refreshment Saloon in Philadelphia. The street addresses of both saloons are shown. The relief organization establishments, situated at the transportation hub between the North and South, provided hospital care, washing, sleeping, and writing facilities to more than 1 million military personnel, sailors, refugees, and freedmen in the course of the war. The print features a large central view of the exterior of the Union saloon with troops arriving and entering ...
Contributed by
The Library Company of Philadelphia
Volunteer Refreshment Saloon, Supported Gratuitously by the Citizens of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
This print depicts the Union Volunteer Refreshment Saloon, located at the southwest corner of Swanson and Washington Avenues in Philadelphia during the American Civil War. The saloon was a volunteer relief agency supported by the citizens of Philadelphia, which provided meals, hospital care, and washing, sleeping, and writing facilities to military personnel, refugees, and freedmen throughout the war. The print shows soldiers, cheered by civilian onlookers, marching out from the main building to embark on cars of the Philadelphia, Wilmington and Baltimore Railroad for transport to the battlefields to the ...
Contributed by
The Library Company of Philadelphia