5 results
Porters Carrying Trunks on Their Back, La Paz, Bolivia
This photograph of La Paz, Bolivia is from the Frank and Frances Carpenter Collection at the Library of Congress. Frank G. Carpenter (1855–1924) was an American writer of books on travel and world geography, whose works helped to popularize cultural anthropology and geography in the United States in the early years of the 20th century. Consisting of photographs taken and gathered by Carpenter and his daughter Frances (1890–1972) to illustrate his writings, the collection includes an estimated 16,800 photographs and 7,000 glass and film negatives. As ...
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Library of Congress
People of Manizales, Province of Córdova
This watercolor by Henry Price (1819–63) depicts a scene in Manizales, province of Córdova (present-day Department of Caldas), Colombia. Four people who presumably have just ascended from the steep ravine in the background are shown, including two women and a porter and his passenger. Price was a British painter and musician who was one of the draftsmen of the Comisión Corográfica (Chorographic Commission), a body tasked with studying the geography, natural resources, natural history, regional culture, and agriculture of the Republic of New Granada (present-day Colombia and Panama). He ...
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National Library of Colombia
Porters in the Mountains of Barbacoas, Province of Barbacoas
This watercolor by Manuel María Paz (1820−1902) shows two porters with heavy loads in the mountains of Barbacoas. One of the men has stopped to fix his shoe. Barbacoas is a municipality in present-day Nariño Department, in the far southwest of Colombia near the border with Ecuador. In 1853, when the picture was made, it was also the name of a province that stretched from the Pacific lowlands up to the mountains of the Cordillera Occidental. The watercolor is typical of Paz’s work, which captured the diversity of ...
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National Library of Colombia
Road to Nóvita via Tamaná Mountain, Chocó Province
This watercolor by Manuel María Paz (1820−1902) shows two porters at a narrow bridge over a rushing mountain stream on what the caption identifies as the road to Nóvita via Tamaná Mountain. The porter on the bridge carries a well-dressed man who is reading a book. The porter approaching the bridge from the right carries a pack. The bridge is the trunk of a large tree. In rugged terrain such as this, porters were sometimes the only means of transport for goods and even people. The Cerro Tamaná is ...
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National Library of Colombia
Porters on the Mountain of Nóvita, Chocó Province
This watercolor by Manuel María Paz (1820−1902) shows a group of porters setting up camp close to Nóvita, the first capital of the Province of Chocó and now a town in the Department of Chocó, western Colombia. The mountain is probably the nearby Cerro Tamaná, which rises some 4,000 meters above sea level on the western edge of the Cordillera Occidental of the Andes. The mountainous terrain, very high rainfall, and many rivers of this region meant that in the 1850s porters were the main means of transporting ...
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National Library of Colombia