10 results in English
Plain, North and East of Kandahar
This photograph of a plain located northeast of Kandahar is from an album of rare historical photographs depicting people and places associated with the Second Anglo-Afghan War. Foothills are visible in the distance. The buildings and other objects in the photograph are not identified, but the irregular pillars could well be tombstones. The Second Anglo-Afghan War began in November 1878 when Great Britain, fearful of what it saw as growing Russian influence in Afghanistan, invaded the country from British India. The first phase of the war ended in May 1879 ...
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Sart Cemetery near Syr-Darya. Golodnaia Steppe
Seen here is a Sart cemetery in the steppe near the Syr-Darya River (just visible in the right background). “Sart” was a term with various ethnic meanings in the late 19th century, and was often used to refer to inhabitants of this area before the coming of Uzbek tribes in the 16th century. The burial mounds were a widespread practice not only in the country but also in cities such as Samarkand. On the right the burial place of a venerated sage is marked by a mazar (ancient shrine) covered ...
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Camel Grazing in the Steppe. Golodnaia Steppe
Located to the southeast of the Kyzyl Kum Desert, Golodnaia Steppe is composed of the loess variety of soil suitable for growing grass and small shrubs in semi-arid conditions. This photograph shows a dromedary camel (with a single hump) grazing in the midst of the steppe grasslands. The harsh continental climate of Golodnaia Steppe—cold in the winter and extreme heat in the summer—made camels the primary beast of burden in this area. In the background is a cow. In the hazy distance is the Turkestan Range. The image ...
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General View of Steppe from the Government House. Golodnaia Steppe
In the late 19th century Grand Duke Nicholas Constantinovich (1850–1918), grandson of Tsar Nicholas I, initiated a development project in Turkestan to create an area for raising cotton, wheat, and livestock in the Golodnaia Steppe (“Hungry Steppe”) by diverting water from the Syr Darya River. This view, taken from a nearby house used for government administration of the irrigation system, shows the vast expanse of the steppe plain. The landscape is treeless. Plant growth in this arid region depended on irrigation. In some areas the steppe had pockets of ...
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Camel Grazing in the Steppe. Golodnaia Steppe
Located to the southeast of the Kyzyl Kum Desert, Golodnaia Steppe is composed of the loess variety of soil suitable for growing grass and small shrubs in semi-arid conditions. Shown here is a dromedary camel (with a single hump) grazing in the midst of the steppe grasslands. The harsh continental climate of Golodnaia Steppe—cold in the winter and extreme heat in the summer—made camels the primary beast of burden in this area. Central Asia is more commonly associated with the Bactrian camel (with two humps). In the hazy ...
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Adobe Buildings in Desert Plains
Shown here are ruins of the fabled city of Merv, situated on the Murghab River in the Mary region of present-day Turkmenistan. Settled as early as the third millennium BC, Merv was taken by the Arabs in 651 and became a staging point for Arab conquests in Central Asia. Merv reached its zenith under the Seljuks in the late 11th and 12th centuries, when it was one of the world’s largest cities and a major stop along the Silk Road. Destroyed by the Mongols in 1221, Merv never regained ...
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Railroad Tracks through Desert Plains
In the late 19th century, the Russian Empire acquired large territories in Central Asia that became known as Russian Turkestan (present-day Uzbekistan and neighboring states). Economic development of the region was closely related to the construction of railroads, such as the Trans-Caspian Railway, begun in 1879 and expanded over the next three decades. An important station was the Russian settlement of Chardjuy (now Turkmenabat), located on the Amu-Darya (Oxus) River and founded in 1886 near the site of an ancient town of the same name. The foreground of this photograph ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Railroad Tracks through Desert Plains
This photograph shows a ribbon of railroad stretching across a sandy plain covered with scrub in the semi-arid region between Bayramaly (present-day Turkmenistan) and Chardjuy. The Russian settlement Chardjuy (now Turkmenabat) was founded in 1886 near the site of an ancient town of the same name. Located on the Amu-Darya (Oxus) River, the town had become an important railroad junction by the time this photograph was taken. The image is by Russian photographer Sergei Mikhailovich Prokudin-Gorskii (1863–1944), who used a special color photography process to create a visual record ...
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Adobe Buildings in Desert Plains
Shown here are a cotton field and adobe buildings on the estate of Grand Duke Nicholas Konstantinovich (1850–1918), grandson of Tsar Nicholas I, in Golodnaia Steppe (Hungry Steppe), located in present-day Uzbekistan. Exiled from Saint Petersburg in 1874 because of a family scandal, Nicholas settled in 1881 in Tashkent. There he sponsored a number of philanthropic and entrepreneurial projects. Among the latter was a vast irrigation scheme intended to provide arable land to Russian settlers and make Golodnaia Steppe a productive area for raising cotton and wheat. The image ...
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General View of The Plains, Province of Casanare
This watercolor by Manuel María Paz (1820−1902) shows the plains in the eastern part of Colombia, known as the Llanos, which are vast open grasslands. The sparsely populated northern plains lie east of the Colombian Andes, largely in present-day Casanare and Vichada Departments where the traditional economic activity was raising cattle. The Llanos also stretch south to the tropical Orinoco River basin and to Venezuela. The watercolor is typical of Paz’s work, which captured the diversity of the population of Colombia and depicted the daily activities and traditional ...