15 results
Suffain Koh Panorama
This panoramic photograph of the Suffain Koh or Safed Koh (meaning White Mountain) range is from an album of rare historical photographs depicting people and places associated with the Second Anglo-Afghan War. The Safed Koh range reaches up to 4,671 meters, creating a natural border between eastern Afghanistan and northwestern Pakistan. A range of smaller hills runs across the middle distance of the photograph, while the Safed Koh looms behind them. The British military camp can be seen stretching across the plain in the foreground. The Second Anglo-Afghan War ...
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From the Khyber to Shuttugardun
This photograph of a rocky landscape beneath the Safed Koh range is from an album of rare historical photographs depicting people and places associated with the Second Anglo-Afghan War. The caption mentions “Shuttugardun,” which is probably a reference to Shotur Gardan (meaning camel’s neck), a small town in Kandahar Province. The Safed Koh range dominates the background, while in the foreground signs of agricultural activity are visible. The right side of the photograph shows a receding layer of short stone walls. The Second Anglo-Afghan War began in November 1878 ...
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Panorama of an Afghan City
This panoramic photograph of an unidentified Afghan city is from an album of rare historical photographs depicting people and places associated with the Second Anglo-Afghan War. The city is in the middle frame, flanked on both sides by rocky hills, and with mountains rising in the distance. The right frame shows a sentry tower atop a hill and a man with his mule stopping for rest beneath it. The Second Anglo-Afghan War began in November 1878 when Great Britain, fearful of what it saw as growing Russian influence in Afghanistan ...
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Panorama of the Bala Hissar
This panoramic photograph of the Bala Hissar (High Fort) in Kabul is from an album of rare historical photographs depicting people and places associated with the Second Anglo-Afghan War. The British envoy to Kabul, Sir Pierre Louis Napoleon Cavagnari (1841–79), was murdered inside the fort in September 1879, triggering a general uprising and the second phase of the war. The Kōh-e Shēr Darwāzah (lion door) Mountain rises behind the fort, while the ancient walls with battlements and sentry towers trail off into the distance on both sides. The fortress ...
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Panorama of Kandahar
This expansive panoramic view of Kandahar is from an album of rare historical photographs depicting people and places associated with the Second Anglo-Afghan War. Panoramic photographs employ a variety of techniques to create a wide angle of view. This panoramic view is comprised of five photographs set together to give the viewer a broader image than would have been possible with a single photograph. The city of Kandahar is seen in the two photo panels on the right, with British troops, horses, and tents in the foreground. The Chilzina (a ...
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Aerial Panoramic View of Beirut
This image by the firm of Maison Bonfils depicts the city of Beirut, Lebanon, sometime in the last third of the 19th century. Maison Bonfils was the extraordinarily prolific venture of the French photographer Félix Bonfils (1831-85), his wife Marie-Lydie Cabanis Bonfils (1837-1918), and their son, Adrien Bonfils (1861-1928). The Bonfils moved to Beirut in 1867 and, over the next five decades, their firm produced one of the world's most important bodies of photographic work about the Middle East. Maison Bonfils was known for landscape photographs, panoramas, biblical scenes ...
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Cycloramic Birds-Eye Views of Belize, British Honduras
This panoramic photograph shows Belize City as it appeared around 1914. “Panoramic” photographs employ a variety of techniques to create a wide angle of view. This panoramic view is comprised of eight photographs spliced together to provide a broader image than would be practical with a single photograph. Belize was the main city and major port of the crown colony of British Honduras. The country changed its name to Belize in 1973 and became fully independent from Britain in 1981.
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Lima
This panoramic photograph of Lima, Peru, taken by an unknown photographer, probably dates from the 1870s. “Panoramic” photographs employ a variety of techniques to create a wide angle of view. This panoramic view is comprised of five photographs spliced together to provide a broader image than would be practical with a single photograph. Lima was founded by the Spanish explorer Francisco Pizarro in 1535. In the 16th and 17th centuries, it was the center of Spanish rule in South America. Today it is the largest city and capital of Peru.
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Photo-Panoramic View of Constantinople
Hatchik “Christopher” Oscanyan (born 1818) was an author, diplomat, and publisher of the first Armenian-language newspaper in Constantinople. A native of Constantinople, Oscanyan was educated in New York City, to which he would later return as Ottoman consul-general. He energetically promoted the Ottoman Empire in a variety of media, including a London exhibition entitled the “Oriental and Turkish Museum” (1853), a popular book entitled The Sultan and His People (1887), and photographs such as this one. “Panoramic” photographs employ a variety of techniques to create a wide angle of view ...
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Panoramic View of Lake Geneva and Monument of Duke of Brunswick
This panoramic photograph shows Lake Geneva, Switzerland, as it appeared in the early 20th century. Panoramic photographs employ a variety of techniques to create a wide angle of view. The Boston office of the Notman Photo Co. copyrighted the photograph in 1909. The Notman firm was founded by William Notman (1826-91), a Scottish-born Canadian photographer who opened a studio in Montreal in 1856. Notman eventually became the largest photographic business in North America, with, at one time or another, seven studios in Canada and 19 in the northeastern United States ...
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Lake Lucerne
This panoramic photograph shows Lake Lucerne, Switzerland, as it appeared in the early 20th century. Panoramic photographs employ a variety of techniques to create a wide angle of view. This view is comprised of three photographs spliced together to provide a broader image than would be possible with a single photograph. The Boston office of the Notman Photo Co. copyrighted the photograph in 1909. The Notman firm was founded by William Notman (1826-1891), a Scottish-born Canadian photographer who opened a studio in Montreal in 1856. Notman eventually became the largest ...
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Panorama of Constantinople, Taken from the Galata Tower
The firm of Sébah & Joaillier was a partnership between Jean Pascal Sébah (son of the eminent Ottoman photographer Pascal Sébah) and the Frenchman Polycarpe Joaillier. The firm became official photographer to the Ottoman sultan and was responsible for an enormous number of photographs from throughout the Ottoman Empire. Panoramic photographs employ a variety of techniques to create a wide angle of view. This panorama, most likely taken in the late 1880s, is comprised of ten photographs spliced together to give the viewer a broader image than would have been practical ...
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Panoramic View of Tetouan
This panoramic photograph of Tetouan, Morocco, by the Tetouan-Asmir Association shows the five century-old medina, the early 20th century Spanish colonial city (or Ensanche) on the edge of Mount Dersa, as well as newly urbanized areas that stretch ten kilometers eastwards towards some of the most beautiful beaches on the Mediterranean. The medina's whitewashed walls, which have earned the city the title of “the White Dove,” and the city’s mountains and beaches reflect the combination of man-made and natural beauty for which Tetouan is known. Located on the ...
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Tetouan-Asmir Association
Johnstown, Pennsylvania, 1904
This panoramic photograph shows the city of Johnstown, Pennsylvania as it appeared in 1904, which was 15 years after the Johnstown Flood, also known as the Great Flood of 1889. On May 31 of that year, the South Fork Dam on Lake Conemaugh, located 23 kilometers upstream of the city, failed catastrophically, unleashing an enormous wave of water that completely destroyed much of downtown Johnstown. 2,209 people were killed, including 99 entire families. Led by Clara Barton, the American Red Cross organized help for the city in its first ...
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View of Cincinnati, Ohio, Circa 1866
This panoramic photograph shows the city of Cincinnati, Ohio, as it appeared around 1866. Panoramic photography was developed in the mid-19th century, soon after the invention of photography, and was used to show wide overviews of cityscapes and landscapes. Making a panorama involved rotating a camera through successive exposures and then splicing the exposures together to produce a composite view. Some of the earliest panoramic photographs were made for the Union army during the Civil War to help military engineers analyze fortifications and terrain. Located on the north side of ...
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