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Cliff
José Jorge Oramas (1911−35) was an artist of Gran Canaria, one of the Canary Islands of Spain. Oramas died young from tuberculosis, and only 70 of his paintings survive. Most are depictions of Canary landscapes and are full of light conveyed through vivid color and intense clarity. Risco (Cliff) shown here is a typical example. The orange, white, and blues impart dynamism to this simple horizontal composition. The sharply perpendicular palm trunks connecting the land and sky add to the sense of space and perspective. Gran Canaria’s vegetation ...
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Cabildo of Gran Canaria, Canary Islands
Botanical Garden: Avenue of Imperial Palms
The Thereza Christina Maria collection is composed of 21,742 photos assembled by Emperor Pedro II (1825-91) throughout his life and donated by him to the National Library of Brazil. The collection covers a wide variety of subjects. It documents the achievements of Brazil and Brazilians in the 19th century and also includes many photographs of Europe, Africa, and North America. The Botanical Garden of Rio de Janeiro was founded in 1808 by King John VI of Portugal and opened to the public in 1822. It remains one of the ...
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National Library of Brazil
Alley of Chamaerops Excelsus, Windmill Palm
At the beginning of the 20th century, the Russian photographer Sergei Mikhailovich Prokudin-Gorskii (1863–1944) used a special color photography process to create a visual record of the Russian Empire. Some of Prokudin-Gorskii’s photographs date from about 1905, but the bulk of his work is from between 1909 and 1915, when, with the support of Tsar Nicholas II and the Ministry of Transportation, he undertook extended trips through many different parts of the empire.
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Library of Congress
Cathedral in the Plaza De Armas, Lima, Peru
This photograph of Lima’s cathedral is from the Frank and Frances Carpenter Collection at the Library of Congress. Frank G. Carpenter (1855–1924) was an American writer of books on travel and world geography, whose works helped to popularize cultural anthropology and geography in the United States in the early years of the 20th century. Consisting of photographs taken and gathered by Carpenter and his daughter Frances (1890–1972) to illustrate his writings, the collection includes an estimated 16,800 photographs and 7,000 glass and film negatives. This ...
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Library of Congress
Chamaerops Excelsus Windmill Palm Lane (15 Years). Chakva
This 1905 photograph shows a lane of windmill palms (Chamaerops excelsus) in the village of Chakva, located in present-day Georgia in the Caucasus. The caption indicates that the palms are 15 years old. This area of southern Georgia, with its semitropical climate along the Black Sea near the Turkish border, was home to exotic floral varieties unknown elsewhere in Russia. Much of the southern Caucasus became part of the Ottoman Empire in the first half of the 16th century. In the 19th century, Russia expanded into this area, including the ...
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Library of Congress
Pinus Excelsa. Chamaerops Excelsus (Windmill Palm) in Sukhumi Botanical Garden
At the beginning of the 20th century, the Russian photographer Sergei Mikhailovich Prokudin-Gorskii (1863–1944) used a special color photography process to create a visual record of the Russian Empire. Some of Prokudin-Gorskii’s photographs date from about 1905, but the bulk of his work is from between 1909 and 1915, when, with the support of Tsar Nicholas II and the Ministry of Transportation, he undertook extended trips through many different parts of the empire.
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Library of Congress
Bananas and Trunk of a Date Palm after Winter of 1910. Sukhumi
This view of banana plants and the severed trunk of a date palm tree was taken after the winter of 1910 in the port of Sukhumi, the major city of Abkhazia on the Black Sea coast. This area of the western Caucasus, with its semitropical climate, was home to exotic floral varieties unknown elsewhere in the Russian Empire. Much of this Transcaucasian region was taken by the Ottoman Empire during the 16th century. The Turks were expelled from Sukhumi in 1810, and the area was annexed to the territory of ...
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Library of Congress
Samoans Posed in Front of a Hut with Palm Fronds and Thatched Roof
This early-20th century photograph shows a group of people on one of the islands in the Samoan archipelago, which is located south of the equator between Hawaii and New Zealand. The Samoans are a Polynesian people, famous for their seafaring skills. The photograph is by A.J. Tattersall, who wrote on its reverse side: “I warn anyone against using this copy without my permission. A.T., Photo, Samoa.” Tattersall was born in Auckland, New Zealand, in 1861, and worked for photographic firms in Auckland before going to Apia, Samoa, to ...
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Library of Congress
Thatched Roof Building in Palm Grove with People Gathered Around Trees and Building
Bikini Atoll in the Marshall Islands was the scene of the first post-World War II atomic tests, carried out by the United States to determine the effects of nuclear weapons on naval ships. This photograph, part of the record of the operation made by the U.S. Army Air Forces, shows inhabitants of the island gathered around a thatched-roof building in a palm grove. Before the tests, all 167 residents of Bikini were evacuated from their home island. Because of the high levels of radiation caused by the explosions over ...
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Library of Congress
Thatched Roof Building Shaded by Palm Trees with People Standing at Entrance
Bikini Atoll in the Marshall Islands was the scene of the first post-World War II atomic tests, carried out by the United States to determine the effects of nuclear weapons on naval ships. This photograph, part of the record of the operation made by the U.S. Army Air Forces, shows people looking out from a typical thatched-roof building on Bikini. Before the tests, all 167 residents of Bikini were evacuated from their home island. Because of the high levels of radiation caused by the explosions over Bikini, neither they ...
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Library of Congress
Qasr Al-Hosn, the Ruler's Fort in Abu Dhabi
This 1965 photograph shows Qasr Al-Hosn, the traditional fortress residence of the shaykhs of Abu Dhabi. Originally built as a watchtower in about 1761 by Shaykh Dhiyab bin Isa, it was expanded into a small fort in about 1793 by his son, Shaykh Shakhbut bin Dhiyab, and at that time was made the permanent residence of the ruler of Abu Dhabi. It was further expanded in the late 1930s following the influx of revenue from oil concessions, and it remained the main palace of Abu Dhabi until 1966. Seen flying ...
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Abu Dhabi Authority for Culture and Heritage
A Falconer in Front of Qasr Al-Hosn, the Ruler's Fort in Abu Dhabi
This 1960s photograph shows a falconer in front of Qasr Al-Hosn, the traditional fortress residence of the shaykhs of Abu Dhabi. Originally built as a watchtower in about 1761 by Shaykh Dhiyab bin Isa, it was expanded into a small fort in about 1793 by his son, Shaykh Shakhbut bin Dhiyab, and at that time was made the permanent residence of the ruler of Abu Dhabi. It was further expanded in the late 1930s as revenue from oil concessions began to flow, and it remained the main palace of Abu ...
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Abu Dhabi Authority for Culture and Heritage
The Cemetery, with Chapel, Algiers, Algeria
This photochrome print of a cemetery in Algiers is part of “Views of People and Sites in Algeria” from the catalog of the Detroit Publishing Company (1905). The 1911 edition of Baedeker’s The Mediterranean, seaports and sea routes: Handbook for Travellers described several cemeteries in the city. The Cimetière Musulman de Belcourt was “the finest Mohammedan burial-ground in Algiers, containing a number of handsome monuments and the picturesque Kubba [tomb] of Sidi Abderrahman Bu-Kobrin (died 1793), a famous Algerian saint, a native of Great Kabylia.” On the sides of ...
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Library of Congress
Street in the Old Town, I, Biskra, Algeria
This photochrome print of a street in Biskra, Algeria, is part of “Views of People and Sites in Algeria” from the catalog of the Detroit Publishing Company (1905). Located on the northern edge of the Sahara, the town goes back at least to the time of the Romans, who appreciated the health-giving properties in the sulfur springs in the area and built a small fortification close to the nearby oases, which they called Vescera. The French garrisoned the town in 1844 and constructed its modern parts. The 1911 edition of ...
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Library of Congress
Street in the Old Town, II, Biskra, Algeria
This photochrome print of a palm-lined street in Biskra, Algeria, is part of “Views of People and Sites in Algeria” from the catalog of the Detroit Publishing Company (1905). Located on the northern edge of the Sahara, the town goes back at least to the time of the Romans, who valued the health-giving properties of the sulfur springs in the area and built a small fortification, which they called Vescera, close to the nearby oases. The French garrisoned the town in 1844 and constructed its modern parts. The 1911 edition ...
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Library of Congress
Mosque in the Old Town, Biskra, Algeria
This photochrome print of a street scene and mosque in Biskra, Algeria, is part of “Views of People and Sites in Algeria” from the catalog of the Detroit Publishing Company (1905). Located on the northern edge of the Sahara, the town goes back at least to the time of the Romans, who valued the health-giving properties of the sulfur springs in the area and built a small fortification, which they called Vescera, close to the nearby oases. The French garrisoned the town in 1844 and constructed its modern parts. The ...
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Library of Congress
Market, Biskra, Algeria
This photochrome print of a market in Biskra, Algeria, is part of “Views of People and Sites in Algeria” from the catalog of the Detroit Publishing Company (1905). Located on the northern edge of the Sahara, the town goes back at least to the time of the Romans, who valued the health-giving properties of the sulfur springs in the area and built a small fortification, which they called Vescera, close to the nearby oases. The French garrisoned the town in 1844 and constructed its modern parts. The 1911 edition of ...
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Library of Congress
Marabut near Biskra, Algeria
This photochrome print of the tomb of a marabout (a Muslim holy man or mystic) in Biskra, Algeria, is part of “Views of People and Sites in Algeria” from the catalog of the Detroit Publishing Company (1905). Located on the northern edge of the Sahara, the town goes back at least to the time of the Romans, who valued the health-giving properties of the sulfur springs in the area and built a small fortification, which they called Vescera, close to the nearby oases. The French garrisoned the town in 1844 ...
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Library of Congress
The River, El Cantara, Algeria
This photochrome print from El Kantara, Algeria, is part of “Views of People and Sites in Algeria” from the catalog of the Detroit Publishing Company (1905). It depicts the river in mid-season, not quite a dry wadi, nor yet the torrent that carved such a ravine. The town was described in the 1911 edition of Baedeker’s The Mediterranean, seaports and searoutes: Handbook for Travellers as “one of the most important caravan-stations in E. Algeria,” a place that owed its prominence and fame to “the grand gorge of the Oued ...
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Library of Congress
General View of The Plains, Province of Casanare
This watercolor by Manuel María Paz (1820−1902) shows the plains in the eastern part of Colombia, known as the Llanos, which are vast open grasslands. The sparsely populated northern plains lie east of the Colombian Andes, largely in present-day Casanare and Vichada Departments where the traditional economic activity was raising cattle. The Llanos also stretch south to the tropical Orinoco River basin and to Venezuela. The watercolor is typical of Paz’s work, which captured the diversity of the population of Colombia and depicted the daily activities and traditional ...
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National Library of Colombia
Bengal - "Passees or Toddy Walas"
This watercolor is from a collection of 18 paintings of Indian subjects by William Tayler (1808–92) dating from around 1842–45. Tayler was a civil servant of the East India Company who lived in India from 1829 until 1867. He became commissioner of Patna in 1855 and in 1857 was involved in the suppression of the Sepoy Rebellion. His measures against the local people were regarded as excessively harsh by his superiors, and he was suspended and given an appointment of lower rank. An enthusiastic amateur artist, Tayler sketched ...
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Brown University Library