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Mercator Map of the Bering Sea from the Northeast Coast of Asia, Between Cape Olutor and Cape Chukotka: Taken from Captain Litke's Map, Supplemented by an Insert of the Anadyr Inlet
Fedor Petrovich Litke was a Russian naval officer, geographer, and explorer. In 1826-29, as captain of the ship Seniavin, he completed his second circumnavigation of the world. On this voyage, he mapped the western coastline of the Bering Sea. He subsequently published, in French and Russian, an eight-volume account of his explorations that included numerous maps and plans. This mid-19th-century Russian map, produced by the Ministry of Marine, is based on one of Litke’s maps. It shows sandbars, notations of depth in sazhens, and anchorages. Relief is shown ...
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National Library of Russia
Report Map on the Hydrogeographic Work of Expeditions to the Eastern Ocean and by Squadron Ships in the Eastern Ocean for 1898 and Preceeding Years
Hydrographic maps mainly serve the needs of navigators and mariners. Other uses include fishing, oceanography, and underwater prospecting. Hydrographic mapping was highly developed in 19th-century Russia, where it was carried out by the Ministry of Marine to create and constantly update navigational charts. This map is from a larger work entitled Sobranie otchetnykh kart gidrograficheskikh rabot (Collection of Report Maps of Hydrogeographic Work and Maps Indicating Shipwrecks for 1898 in the Black Sea, Sea of Azov, Caspian Sea, White Sea, Baltic Sea, and Parts of the Eastern Ocean and ...
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National Library of Russia
Papers of Joseph Ingraham, 1790-1792: Journal of the Voyage of the Brigantine "Hope" from Boston to the North-West Coast of America
Joseph Ingraham was the master of the brigantine Hope, a 70-ton American ship that was designed and equipped to make the trip around Cape Horn to the west coast of North America, from there to China, and from China back to Boston. In the late 18th century, American fur traders undertook expeditions to the northwestern Pacific, where they obtained furs, which they brought for sale to the Chinese port of Canton (present-day Guangdong). There they acquired tea, silk, porcelain, and other goods for sale in the U.S. market. This ...
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Library of Congress