4 results in English
Collection of Words for Everyday Use
The Setsuyōshū (Collection of words for everyday use) is a type of Japanese dictionary from the end of the Muromachi period (late 16th century), collated in iroha (Japanese phonetic alphabet) order and subdivided into semantic categories. This book is one of the first of these dictionaries to have been published. It was created in order to instruct people how to write certain words in kanji (Chinese characters) when writing letters or documents. It contains hardly any examples or explanations. There is no date of publication, but it has long been ...
Contributed by National Diet Library
Grammar of the Castillan Language
Presented here is the first grammar of the Castilian language. This is also the first grammar of any vernacular language to be printed in Europe. The book was published in 1492, at a time when Castilian was still not considered a “language of culture.” The author, Antonio de Nebrija (circa 1444−1522), had previously written an Introductiones latinae (Introduction to Latin). He concluded that students would be better able to study Latin if there were established rules for their native language of Castilian and if they were taught these rules ...
Contributed by National Library of Spain
Writing Manual
Sava Dobroplodni (1820–94) was a noted educator, dramatist, and literary figure during the era of the National Revival in Bulgaria. In his role as an educator, he wrote many textbooks, including this pismennik (writing manual). Published in 1853, Dobroplodni’s guide was one of the earliest Bulgarian manuals of writing, or orthography, as well as the first to provide definitions of such literary terms as metaphor, synonym, and allegory. The book showed the Slavic, Greek, German, and French alphabets, offered rules for writing, and gave examples of good writing ...
Spelling Book for the Children of the Martínez de Taos Family
This Spanish-language schoolbook on the use and pronunciation of the letters of the alphabet and the rules of punctuation is the first book printed in New Mexico. In 1834, Mexican official Ramón Abréu brought a printing press from Mexico to Santa Fe, where Abréu and press operator Jesús María Baca produced the book under the direction of Father Antonio José Martínez (1793-1867). Martínez, a priest who founded schools in the Taos area and was an active supporter of Mexican independence, purchased the press the following year and moved it to ...
Contributed by Library of Congress