108 results
Church of the Ascension (St. Theodosius) (1903-10), Southwest View, Perm', Russia
This southwest view of the Perm' Church of the Ascension in the name of St. Feodosii was taken in 1999 by Dr. William Brumfield, American photographer and historian of Russian architecture, as part of the "Meeting of Frontiers" project at the Library of Congress. Established in the 1720s as a factory settlement on the middle reaches of the Kama River, Perm’ (so named in 1781) is one of Russia's largest cities. Before the 1917 revolution, the city's merchant community gave substantial donations for church construction. The donor for ...
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Church of St. Nicholas (1705), South Facade, Detail, Nyrob, Russia
This photograph of the south façade of the Church of St. Nicholas in Nyrob (northern part of Perm' Territory) was taken in 2000 by Dr. William Brumfield, American photographer and historian of Russian architecture, as part of the "Meeting of Frontiers" project at the Library of Congress. Situated near the Kolva River some 160 kilometers north of Solikamsk, Nyrob is first mentioned in historical sources in 1579. Because of its remote location, the settlement was chosen by Tsar Boris Godunov in 1601 as the place of exile for the boyar ...
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Yegoshikha Cemetery, Church of the Dormition (1905), Southwest View, Perm', Russia
This southwest view of the entrance gate and the Church of the Dormition at the Egoshikha Cemetery in Perm' was taken in 1999 by Dr. William Brumfield, American photographer and historian of Russian architecture, as part of the "Meeting of Frontiers" project at the Library of Congress. Established in the 1720s as a factory settlement on the middle reaches of the Kama River, Perm’ (so named in 1781) is one of Russia's largest cities. The first settlement was located on the small Egoshikha River, near its confluence with the ...
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Monastery, Cathedral of the Transfiguration of the Savior (1558-1566), Northwest View with Gallery (1602), and Church of St. Nicholas (1832-1834) Solovetskii Island, Russia
This photograph of the central ensemble of the Transfiguration-Solovetskii Monastery was taken in 1998 by Dr. William Brumfield, American photographer and historian of Russian architecture, as part of the "Meeting of Frontiers" project at the Library of Congress. Located on Large Solovetskii Island, part of an archipelago in the White Sea, the monastery was founded as early as 1429 by the monk Savvatii. Following his death in 1435, the enterprise was revived by the monk Zosima in 1436. After decades of tenuous existence, the remote monastery greatly expanded in the ...
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Log Church of the Epiphany (also known as Nativity of the Virgin), (1617), Northwest View, with Kama River in Background, Pianteg, Russia
This photograph of the southeast view of the log Church of the Epiphany (also known as the Church of the Nativity of the Mother of God) in the village of Pianteg (Perm' Region) was taken in 1999 by Dr. William Brumfield, American photographer and historian of Russian architecture, as part of the "Meeting of Frontiers" project at the Library of Congress. Situated on the steep left bank of the Kama River some 40 kilometers southwest of Cherdyn', the Pianteg church is the oldest surviving log structure in the western Urals ...
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Church of the Icon of the Mother of God, from Tokhtarevo Village (1694), East Facade. Reassembled at Khokhlovka Architectural Preserve, Russia.
This photograph of the northeast view of the log Church of the Mother of God from the village of Tokhtarevo (Suksun District, Perm' Region) was taken in 1999 by Dr. William Brumfield, American photographer and historian of Russian architecture, as part of the "Meeting of Frontiers" project at the Library of Congress. Situated on the Sylva River (a southern tributary of the Kama River), Tokhtarevo was once a flourishing village, as the size and beauty of its church indicate. Built in 1694, the church at Tokhtarevo follows the traditional plan ...
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Landing Place and Cathedral, Belgrade, Servia
This photochrome print of Belgrade as seen from the neighborhood of Kalemegdan is part of “Views of Belgrade, Serbia” from the catalog of the Detroit Photographic Company. At the top of the hill is the Saborna Crkva (Cathedral church), the great Serbian Orthodox cathedral dedicated to St. Michael, built by Prince Miloš Obrenović in 1837-40. The waterway is the Sava River, which flows into the Danube River. The “landing space,” or the port of Sava, played a role in Belgrade's history since the Roman occupation in the 3rd century ...
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The Convent, Cetinje, Montenegro
This late 19th-century photochrome print is part of “Views of Montenegro” from the catalog of the Detroit Publishing Company. It depicts the Cetinje Monastery at the foot of Mount Lovćen in Cetinje. The monastery was built in 1701 by Bishop–Prince Danilo (1670–1735), the founder of the Petrović Njegoš dynasty, following the destruction by Venetian forces of the medieval Cetinje Monastery, a Serb Orthodox monastery built by Ivan the Black in 1484. The monastery has great historical significance for the Montenegrin people. It contains the remains of Saint Peter ...
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Church of Transfiguration, from Yanidor Village (1702), Northwest View, Reassembled at Khokhlovka Architectural Preserve, Russia
This northwest view of the log Church of the Transfiguration of the Savior from the village of Yanidor (Cherdyn' District, Perm' Region) was taken in 1999 by Dr. William Brumfield, American photographer and historian of Russian architecture, as part of the "Meeting of Frontiers" project at the Library of Congress. Situated on the Sypan River (a northern sub-tributary of the Kama River), Yanidor was once a flourishing village, as the size and beauty of its church indicate. Built in 1702, the Church of the Transfiguration follows the traditional plan of ...
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Church of the Elevation of the Cross (1747-58), South View, Irkutsk, Russia
This southeast view of the Church of the Elevation of the Cross in the city of Irkutsk was taken in 1999 by Dr. William Brumfield, American photographer and historian of Russian architecture, as part of the "Meeting of Frontiers" project at the Library of Congress. Built in stages from 1747 to 1760 on the Hill of the Cross, the church originally bore the name of its first main altar, dedicated to the Trinity, with a secondary altar dedicated to the Elevation of the Cross. The elongated form combines traditional 17th-century ...
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Church of the Elevation of the Cross (1747-58), Southeast Corner, Irkutsk, Russia
This southeast view of the main structure of the Church of the Elevation of the Cross in the city of Irkutsk was taken in 1999 by Dr. William Brumfield, American photographer and historian of Russian architecture, as part of the "Meeting of Frontiers" project at the Library of Congress. Built in stages from 1747 to 1760 on the Hill of the Cross, the church originally bore the name of its first altar, dedicated to the Trinity, with a secondary altar dedicated to the Elevation of the Cross. The primary altar ...
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Church of the Resurrection (1690s), Southwest View, Kargopol', Russia
This northwest view of the Church of the Resurrection of the Savior in Kargopol' (Arkhangel'sk Oblast') was taken in 1998 by Dr. William Brumfield, American photographer and historian of Russian architecture, as part of the "Meeting of Frontiers" project at the Library of Congress. Kargopol' is one of the oldest settlements in the Russian north, founded perhaps in the 12th, or even the 11th, century. Its location near Lake Lacha and the source of the Onega River (which flows into the White Sea) enabled Kargopol' to benefit from extensive ...
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Church of the Nativity of John the Baptist (1740-51), Southeast View, Kargopol', Russia
This southeast view of the Church of the Nativity of John the Baptist in Kargopol' (Arkhangel'sk Oblast') was taken in 1998 by Dr. William Brumfield, American photographer and historian of Russian architecture, as part of the "Meeting of Frontiers" project at the Library of Congress. Kargopol' is one of the oldest settlements in the Russian north, founded perhaps in the 12th, or even the 11th, century. Its location near Lake Lacha and the source of the Onega River (which flows into the White Sea) enabled Kargopol' to benefit from ...
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Church of the Resurrection (1690s), Southwest View, Kargopol', Russia
This southwest winter view of the Church of the Resurrection of the Savior in Kargopol' (Arkhangel'sk Oblast') was taken in 1998 by Dr. William Brumfield, American photographer and historian of Russian architecture, as part of the "Meeting of Frontiers" project at the Library of Congress. Kargopol' is one of the oldest settlements in the Russian north, founded perhaps in the 12th, or even the 11th, century. Its location near Lake Lacha and the source of the Onega River (which flows into the White Sea) enabled Kargopol' to benefit from ...
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Church of the Annuciation (1692), Northeast View, Kargopol', Russia
This northeast view of the Church of the Annunciation in Kargopol' (Arkhangel'sk Oblast') was taken in 1999 by Dr. William Brumfield, American photographer and historian of Russian architecture, as part of the "Meeting of Frontiers" project at the Library of Congress. Kargopol' is one of the oldest settlements in the Russian north, founded perhaps in the 12th, or even the 11th, century. Its location near Lake Lacha and the source of the Onega River (which flows into the White Sea) enabled Kargopol' to benefit from trade in salt and ...
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Church of the Savior (1706-10), Southwest View, Irkutsk, Russia
This photograph of the Church of the Miraculous Icon of the Savior (Spas Nerukotvornyi) in the city of Irkutsk was taken in 1999 by Dr. William Brumfield, American photographer and historian of Russian architecture, as part of the "Meeting of Frontiers" project at the Library of Congress. From the time of its first log forts in the 1660s, Irkutsk was destined to be the administrative and commercial center of eastern Siberia. In 1700, Irkutsk became the third Siberian city capable of producing bricks on a large scale. In 1706-10, master ...
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Church of the Savior (1706-10), East View, Irkutsk, Russia
This photograph of the Church of the Miraculous Icon of the Savior (Spas Nerukotvornyi) in the city of Irkutsk was taken in 1999 by Dr. William Brumfield, American photographer and historian of Russian architecture, as part of the "Meeting of Frontiers" project at the Library of Congress. From the time of its first log forts in the 1660s, Irkutsk was destined to be the administrative and commercial center of eastern Siberia. In 1700, Irkutsk became the third Siberian city capable of producing bricks on a large scale. Shortly thereafter, in ...
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Church of the Resurrection (1686-94), Southwest View, Matigory, Russia
This southwest view of the Church of the Resurrection in the village of Verkhnie Matigory (Arkhangel'sk Oblast) was taken in 1999 by Dr. William Brumfield, American photographer and historian of Russian architecture, as part of the "Meeting of Frontiers" project at the Library of Congress. Made of stuccoed brick with white ornamental details, the Church of the Resurrection was erected in 1686-94 on a bluff above the Matigorka River (a tributary of the Northern Dvina River) by the master builder Fëdor Spiridonov Stafurov. The picturesque arrangement of its volumes ...
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Church of the Resurrection, Interior, with Icon Screen, Matigory, Russia
This view of the icon screen of the Church of the Resurrection in the village of Verkhnie Matigory (Arkhangel'sk Oblast) was taken in 1999 by Dr. William Brumfield, American photographer and historian of Russian architecture, as part of the "Meeting of Frontiers" project at the Library of Congress. The Church of the Resurrection was built in 1686-94. Its five-tiered 18th-century icon screen (iconostasis) is one of the best preserved in the Russian north and contains a number of ancient icons. Although part of the second tier (Holy Festivals) is ...
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Church of St. Nicholas (1584?), Southwest View, Liavlia, Russia
This southwest view of the ancient Church of Saint Nicholas (Dormition), in the village of Liavlia, on the right bank of the Dvina River (Arkhangel'sk Oblast) was taken in 1998 by Dr. William Brumfield, American photographer and historian of Russian architecture, as part of the "Meeting of Frontiers" project at the Library of Congress. Liavlia was one of the first Russian settlements in the area of the lower Dvina, established by the medieval trading city of Novgorod as early as the 14th century. This log church originally was built ...
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Church of the Hodigitria Icon of the Virgin (1763), Southwest View, Kimzha, Russia
This southwest winter view of the Church of the Hodigitria Icon of the Mother of God, in the village of Kimzha (Mezen'sky District, Arkhangel'sk Oblast), was taken in 2000 by Dr. William Brumfield, American photographer and historian of Russian architecture, as part of the "Meeting of Frontiers" project at the Library of Congress. The village of Kimzha arose in the early 16th century, on the right bank of the Kimzha River, a tributary of the Mezen' River, which flows into the White Sea. In 1699, a lightning strike ...
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