8 results
"The Child at Your Door." 400,000 Orphans Starving, No State Aid Available. Campaign for $30,000,000
The American Committee for Armenian and Syrian Relief was established in 1915 with the cooperation of the United States Department of State, for the purpose of providing humanitarian relief to Armenians forcibly deported from Anatolia to other parts of the Ottoman Empire during World War I. The Ottoman parliament passed a law by which privately collected funds from the United States could be distributed to displaced Armenians via the U.S. Embassy in Constantinople. The committee, which raised millions of dollars at public rallies and churches, issued this poster as ...
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Library of Congress
Historical Concert for the Benefit of Widows and Orphans
This poster by the Hungarian designer and graphic artist Josef von Divéky (1887–1951) advertises a January 1918 concert for the benefit of the widows and orphans of Austro-Hungarian soldiers killed in World War I. It shows five military musicians in uniforms from different historical periods; the coat of arms of Austria-Hungary is at the top. The emperor and empress of the Austro-Hungarian Empire are listed as patrons of the concert, which was organized with the support of the Ministry of War. Austria-Hungary suffered an estimated 1,100,000 killed ...
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Library of Congress
Lest They Perish. Campaign for $30,000,000. American Committee for Relief in the Near East: Armenia-Greece-Syria-Persia
The American Committee for Armenian and Syrian Relief was established in 1915 with the cooperation of the United States Department of State, for the purpose of providing humanitarian relief to Armenians forcibly deported from Anatolia to other parts of the Ottoman Empire during World War I. The Ottoman parliament passed a law by which privately collected funds from the United States could be distributed to displaced Armenians via the U.S. embassy in Constantinople. This poster, showing a woman carrying a baby on her back surrounded by the rubble of ...
Contributed by
Library of Congress
Girard College
This lithograph shows a view of Founder's Hall at Girard College in Philadelphia, which was constructed in 1833–47 from designs by Philadelphia architect Thomas Ustick Walters. The hall occupied a site between what became Girard Avenue and Ridge Avenue at Corinthian Avenue. Girard College was established through a bequest from Stephen Girard, a Philadelphia financier and philanthropist, for the creation of a school for poor white male orphans. The illustration is by John Caspar Wild (circa 1804–46), a Swiss-born artist and lithographer, who arrived in Philadelphia from ...
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The Library Company of Philadelphia
The Girard College, Philadelphia
This lithograph shows an exterior view of Girard College at Girard Avenue, Philadelphia, including Founder's Hall and the eastern and western outbuildings. The school buildings, designed by Philadelphia architect Thomas Ustick Walter in the Greek Revival style, were constructed in 1833–47. Girard College was established through a bequest from Stephen Girard, a Philadelphia financier and philanthropist, for the creation of a school for poor white male orphans. The illustration is by John Caspar Wild (circa 1804–46), a Swiss-born artist and lithographer, who arrived in Philadelphia from Paris ...
Contributed by
The Library Company of Philadelphia
View of the Philadelphia Alms House: Blockley
This 1835 lithograph by George Lehman shows the Blockley Alms House in Philadelphia, as seen from Hyde Park on the east bank of the Schuylkill River. The view shows the riverbanks where two men fish and cows graze. A two-masted sailing ship passes by, with other ships on the river and the sprawling city stretched out in the background. William Strickland (1788–1854), a founder of Greek Revival architecture in the United States, designed the quadrangle of four large buildings that formed the almshouse. The original Philadelphia Alms House was ...
Contributed by
The Library Company of Philadelphia
Girard College, Main Building, Philadelphia
This print is a view of Founder's Hall, Girard College, Philadelphia, issued in around 1835 as a souvenir of the building while it was under construction. The text at bottom announces: “Girard College. Main Building. Now erecting near Philadelphia under the superintendence of T.U. Walter, Esq.” The building was designed in the Greek Revival style by Philadelphia architect Thomas Ustick Walter and constructed in 1833-47. It occupied a site between what became Girard Avenue and Ridge Avenue at Corinthian Avenue. Small figures are seen in front of the ...
Contributed by
The Library Company of Philadelphia
Alms House. Philadelphia
This 1840s print shows the Blockley Alms House in Philadelphia, as seen from the east bank of the Schuylkill River. It includes the Market Street Bridge, Beck’s shot tower (a city landmark since 1808) and, in the far distance, the Eastern State Penitentiary. William Strickland (1788–1854), a founder of Greek Revival architecture in the United States, designed the quadrangle of four large buildings that formed the almshouse. The original Philadelphia Alms House was constructed in the early 1730s and was the first multifunctional government-sponsored institution for the care ...
Contributed by
The Library Company of Philadelphia