27 results in English
Governor-General's Residence (1814-21). Built by the Merchant M. V. Sibiriakov, the Building Now Serves as Part of Irkutsk State University, Irkutsk, Russia.
This photograph of the former Sibiriakov Mansion in the city of Irkutsk was taken in 1999 by Dr. William Brumfield, American photographer and historian of Russian architecture, as part of the "Meeting of Frontiers" project at the Library of Congress. From the time of its first log forts in the 1660s, Irkutsk was destined to be the administrative and commercial center of eastern Siberia. In 1700, Irkutsk became the third Siberian city capable of producing bricks on a large scale. This grand residence, with a Corinthian portico, was built in ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Cathedral of the Annuciation (1560-84), Southwest Panorama with Vychegda River, Sol'vychegodsk, Russia
This southwest view of the Cathedral of the Annunciation at Sol'vychegodsk (Arkhangel'sk Oblast) was taken in 1996 by Dr. William Brumfield, American photographer and historian of Russian architecture, as part of the "Meeting of Frontiers" project at the Library of Congress. Located near the confluence of the Vychegda and Northern Dvina rivers, Sol’vychegodsk (Salt of the Vychegda) is in an area of many salt springs. In the 16th century it became the center of vast trading operations owned by the Stroganovs, whose wealth was based on salt ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
G.V. Usov House (Late 18th Century), Velikii Ustiug, Russia
This view of the Usov mansion in Velikii Ustiug (Vologda Oblast) was taken in 1996 by Dr. William Brumfield, American photographer and historian of Russian architecture, as part of the "Meeting of Frontiers" project at the Library of Congress. Located where the Sukhona and Iug rivers merge to form the Northern Dvina River, Velikii Ustiug achieved the apogee of its prosperity in the 18th century. At some point between 1785 and 1800, Vasilii Usov, one of Russia's wealthiest merchants, built this elegant stucco brick neoclassical mansion overlooking the Sukhona ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Spaso-Sumorin Monastery, Church of the Ascension (1796-1801 and 1825), South Facade, Tot'ma, Russia
This south view of the Church (sobor) of the Ascension at Savior-Sumorin Monastery near Tot'ma (Vologda Oblast) was taken in 1996 by Dr. William Brumfield, American photographer and historian of Russian architecture, as part of the "Meeting of Frontiers" project at the Library of Congress. Located on the Sukhona River, Tot’ma had become a major center of salt refining by the middle of the 16th century. Monasteries in the Vologda region received tax exemptions from Moscow for salt production, and the Savior-Prilutskii Monastery sent one of its monks ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Spaso-Sumorin Monastery, Church of the Ascension (1796-1801 and 1825), Northwest View, Tot'ma, Russia
This northwest winter view of the Church (sobor) of the Ascension at Savior-Sumorin Monastery near Tot'ma (Vologda Oblast) was taken in 1998 by Dr. William Brumfield, American photographer and historian of Russian architecture, as part of the "Meeting of Frontiers" project at the Library of Congress. Located on the Sukhona River, Tot’ma had become a major center of salt refining by the middle of the 16th century. Monasteries in the Vologda area received tax exemptions from Moscow for salt production, and the Savior-Prilutskii Monastery sent one of its ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Spaso-Sumorin Monastery, Church of the Ascension (1796-1801 and 1825), East Facade, Tot'ma, Russia
This east view of the Church (sobor) of the Ascension at Savior-Sumorin Monastery near Tot'ma (Vologda Oblast) was taken in 1999 by Dr. William Brumfield, American photographer and historian of Russian architecture, as part of the "Meeting of Frontiers" project at the Library of Congress. Located on the Sukhona River, Tot’ma had become a major center of salt refining by the middle of the 16th century. Monasteries in the Vologda area received tax exemptions from Moscow for salt production, and the Savior-Prilutskii Monastery sent one of its monks ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Church of the Dormition (1749-55 and 1800-08), with Bell Tower (1790-1808), Northeast View, Tot'ma, Russia
This northeast view of the Church of the Dormition in Tot'ma (Vologda Oblast) was taken in 1997 by Dr. William Brumfield, American photographer and historian of Russian architecture, as part of the "Meeting of Frontiers" project at the Library of Congress. Located on the Sukhona River, Tot’ma for centuries was part of an important trading network that led from the Russian heartland northward to the White Sea. Its prosperity was reflected in the number of graceful brick churches built in the 18th century. The Church of the Dormition ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Puzan-Puzyrevsky House (Herzen Street No. 35) (1831-33), Vologda, Russia
This view of the Puzan-Puzyrevskii house, No. 35 Herzen Street in Vologda, was taken in 2000 by Dr. William Brumfield, American photographer and historian of Russian architecture, as part of the "Meeting of Frontiers" project at the Library of Congress. Before the founding of Saint Petersburg in 1703, Russia depended on a northern route through the White Sea for trade with western Europe. One of the important centers on this route was Vologda, founded in the 12th century. Vologda remained a transportation and commercial hub in the Russian north. In ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Palace of the Nation, Brussels, Belgium
This photochrome print of the Palace of the Nation in Brussels is part of “Views of Architecture and Other Sites in Belgium” from the catalog of the Detroit Publishing Company (1905). The Paleis der Natie, or Palais de la Nation, is a neoclassical building that faces the Royal Palace, or Palais Royal, and that has served as the seat of the Belgian parliament since the country’s independence in 1830. The building was constructed in 1779–83 for the assemblies of the old Council of Brabant, according to a design ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
The Madeleine, Paris, France
This photochrome print of the Madeleine, or L'Eglise Sainte-Marie-Madeleine (Church of St. Mary Magdalene) in Paris is part of “Views of Architecture, Monuments, and Other Sites in France” in the catalog of the Detroit Publishing Company (1905). Construction of a church on the site of the Madeleine began in 1764 under the direction of chief architect Pierre Contant d'Ivry (1698–1777), but was halted during the French Revolution of 1789–97. In 1806, the Emperor Napoleon I ordered the original church to be razed and commissioned Pierre-Alexandre Barthélémy ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Arc de Triomphe, de l'Etoile, Paris, France
This photochrome print of the Arc de Triomphe is part of “Views of Architecture, Monuments, and Other Sites in France” from the catalog of the Detroit Publishing Company (1905). Standing at one end of the Champs-Elysées, the Arc de Triomphe was commissioned by Napoleon I to honor the French army. Construction began in 1806, but was halted after the Bourbon restoration of 1815. It was resumed in the 1830s by King Louis-Philippe and completed in 1836. The three architects associated with the project were Jean Chalgrin (active 1806-11), L. Joust ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
The Isaac Cathedral from Alexander's Garden, St. Petersburg, Russia
This photochrome print of St. Isaac’s Cathedral in St. Petersburg is part of “Views of Architecture and Other Sites Primarily in Poland, Russia, and the Ukraine” from the catalog of the Detroit Publishing Company (1905). Named after St. Isaac, the presumed patron saint of Peter the Great (1672-1725), the cathedral was commissioned by Alexander I (1777–1825) and was built between 1819 and 1858 under the direction of the French architect Richard de Montferrand (1786–1858). It is the largest cathedral in Russia. According to Baedeker’s Russia with ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
The Arch of Peace, Milan, Italy
This photochrome print of the Arch of Peace (Arco della Pace) in Milan is part of “Views of Architecture and Other Sites in Italy” from the catalog of the Detroit Publishing Company (1905). This 23-meter marble structure stands in the Piazza Sempione, at one end of the Simplon Road, the strategic route through the Alps taken by Napoleon I when he invaded northern Italy in 1800. Napoleon later commissioned the arch to commemorate his victories. Construction began in 1806 under the direction of the architect Luigi Cagnola (1762–1833), but ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Vienna 1, Parliament
Rudolf von Alt (1812–1905) was an Austrian painter, draughtsman, and printmaker known for his city scenes, landscapes, and interiors. Shown here is Alt’s ink drawing with white heightening of the parliament building in Vienna, signed and dated 1885 in the lower right-hand corner. Located in the Innere Stadt (Inner City), or the first district of Vienna (“Vienna 1”), the neoclassical structure was built in 1874–83 by Danish architect Baron Theophil Edvard von Hansen (1813–91). It served as the meeting place of the two chambers of the ...
Contributed by Austrian National Library
Cathedral of St. Sophia (1568-70), with Belltower (1869-70), Southeast View, Vologda, Russia
This photograph of the Cathedral of Saint Sophia in Vologda was taken in 1998 by Dr. William Brumfield, American photographer and historian of Russian architecture, as part of the "Meeting of Frontiers" project at the Library of Congress. Before the founding of St. Petersburg in 1703, Russia depended on a northern route through the White Sea for trade with western Europe. One of the most important centers on this route was Vologda, founded in the 12th century. The significance of Vologda increased during the reign of Ivan IV (the Terrible ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Girard College
This lithograph shows a view of Founder's Hall at Girard College in Philadelphia, which was constructed in 1833–47 from designs by Philadelphia architect Thomas Ustick Walters. The hall occupied a site between what became Girard Avenue and Ridge Avenue at Corinthian Avenue. Girard College was established through a bequest from Stephen Girard, a Philadelphia financier and philanthropist, for the creation of a school for poor white male orphans. The illustration is by John Caspar Wild (circa 1804–46), a Swiss-born artist and lithographer, who arrived in Philadelphia from ...
The Girard College, Philadelphia
This lithograph shows an exterior view of Girard College at Girard Avenue, Philadelphia, including Founder's Hall and the eastern and western outbuildings. The school buildings, designed by Philadelphia architect Thomas Ustick Walter in the Greek Revival style, were constructed in 1833–47. Girard College was established through a bequest from Stephen Girard, a Philadelphia financier and philanthropist, for the creation of a school for poor white male orphans. The illustration is by John Caspar Wild (circa 1804–46), a Swiss-born artist and lithographer, who arrived in Philadelphia from Paris ...
First Congregational Unitarian Church, Philadelphia
This print is a view of the front facade of the First Congregational Unitarian Church, located on the 900 block of Locust Street in Philadelphia. The church was built in 1828 after the designs of Philadelphia architect William Strickland (1788–1854), who was one of the first architects of the Greek Revival style in the United States, as well as a civil engineer and artist. Also shown are pedestrian traffic and a partial view of neighboring buildings obscured by trees. The columns supporting the portico of the church were salvaged ...
Girard College, Main Building, Philadelphia
This print is a view of Founder's Hall, Girard College, Philadelphia, issued in around 1835 as a souvenir of the building while it was under construction. The text at bottom announces: “Girard College. Main Building. Now erecting near Philadelphia under the superintendence of T.U. Walter, Esq.” The building was designed in the Greek Revival style by Philadelphia architect Thomas Ustick Walter and constructed in 1833-47. It occupied a site between what became Girard Avenue and Ridge Avenue at Corinthian Avenue. Small figures are seen in front of the ...
U.S. Mint, Philadelphia
This lithograph print shows the second building of the United States Mint, which needed more space for its rising production than was afforded by its first structure. The new Mint opened in 1833 and was designed by William Strickland (1788–1854) in the early Greek Revival style. It is a simple building with two stories and a basement. Its wide flight of stairs, portico, and Ionic columns appear both dignified and inviting. The print is by John Caspar Wild (circa 1804−46) a Swiss-born artist and lithographer, who arrived in ...
United States Bank, Chestnut Street, Philadelphia
This lithograph shows the United States Bank, also called the Second Bank of the United States (because it was the second federally authorized national bank), on the 400 block of the south side of Chestnut Street, Philadelphia. Its functions included regulation of the currency and handling fiscal transactions for the U.S. government. The bank was constructed in 1818−24 to designs by Philadelphia architect William Strickland (1787–1854) and was one of the first Greek Revival buildings in the country, apparently modeled on the Parthenon in Athens. The building ...
State House. Philadelphia
This lithographic print shows the State House (Independence Hall) on Chestnut Street between 5th and 6th Streets in Philadelphia. Completed in 1753, to designs by Edmund Woolley and Andrew Hamilton, it first served as the colonial legislature for Pennsylvania. The building is best known as the site where the Declaration of Independence was adopted in 1776. The Greek Revival facade shown here was added by architect John Haviland in 1830. The print is by John Caspar Wild (circa 1804-46), a Swiss-born artist and lithographer who arrived in Philadelphia from Paris ...
U.S. Naval Asylum
The main building of the U.S. Naval Asylum (Biddle Hall) was designed by William Strickland (1787–1854) in 1826 and completed in 1833. Strickland was one of the first architects of the Greek Revival style in the United States and also a civil engineer. The columns on the asylum’s balconies were an innovative use of cast-iron as a building material. The U.S. Navy commissioned the building to house officers and seamen who had been disabled on duty as well as elderly and impoverished naval personnel. This print ...
Alms House. Philadelphia
This 1840s print shows the Blockley Alms House in Philadelphia, as seen from the east bank of the Schuylkill River. It includes the Market Street Bridge, Beck’s shot tower (a city landmark since 1808) and, in the far distance, the Eastern State Penitentiary. William Strickland (1788–1854), a founder of Greek Revival architecture in the United States, designed the quadrangle of four large buildings that formed the almshouse. The original Philadelphia Alms House was constructed in the early 1730s and was the first multifunctional government-sponsored institution for the care ...
Pennsylvania Hospital
This print shows an exterior view from the southeast of the Pennsylvania Hospital, located on Pine Street between 8th and 9th Streets in Philadelphia. The street scene in the foreground includes a carriage, a wagon, riders on horseback including a woman riding sidesaddle, pedestrians, and a watchman's guardhouse. Benjamin Franklin helped raise funds for the first Pennsylvania Hospital building, the east wing, which was designed by Samuel Rhoads and constructed in 1755 on a site that was then far from the smells and noise of the city center. Rhoads ...
Merchants' Exchange
This lithograph shows the view looking northeast from the intersection of Dock, Third, and Walnut Streets in Philadelphia to the Merchants' Exchange. Built between 1832 and 1833 to the designs of William Strickland (1788–1854), the exchange functioned as a commercial and financial hub and post office and was the first large central building in Philadelphia for the conduct of business. Men are seen walking around and horse-drawn omnibuses arrive at and are parked in front of the building. Light pedestrian traffic is visible in the street and at the ...
Pennsylvania Institution for the Deaf and Dumb
This lithograph is an exterior view of the Pennsylvania Institution for the Deaf and Dumb, located at the northwest corner of Broad and Pine Streets in Philadelphia. Designed by Philadelphia architect John Haviland, the building was constructed in 1824–26, soon after the school's founding. The illustration was created by artist Albert Newsam (1809–64) and was used as the frontispiece for the annual report of the board of directors of the institution for the year 1850. Born deaf and mute in Steubenville, Ohio, Newsam showed artistic promise as ...