8 results in English
A Handbook on Theoretical and Practical Music
This 1825 manuscript, prepared for a print edition, is a handbook on theoretical and practical music, written in Katharevousa, a purist form of Modern Greek developed in the early 19th century and at that time widely used for literary and official purposes. The work is an introduction to the Byzantine notation for the liturgical chant used in the Greek Orthodox Church that most likely was intended for students of Byzantine ecclesiastical music. The text probably was written by a scribe named Basileios Nikolaḯdes Byzantios. On the first page, which is ...
The Irmologion, “Rozniki,” and Feasts: A Liturgical Compilation with Hook Notation
An Irmologion is a liturgical book of the Eastern Orthodox Church and of some Eastern Rite Catholic Churches. It contains texts for singing in church called irmoi (introductory hymns, and sometimes concluding ones) for canons chanted at Matins and other services throughout the liturgical year. The term Irmologion comes from the Greek words for “link” and “to collect.” Rozniki (chants used for some specific occasions, such as Christmas and Easter) were mostly sung in Old Believer communities, who rejected 17th century reforms in the official Russian Orthodox Church. This work ...
Missa Barcelona. Ars Nova
In the middle of the 14th century, foreign minstrels and chanters in the service of the royal house of Catalonia-Aragon introduced new musical styles into the country. During the reigns of Peter IV of Aragon (Peter III in the principality of Catalonia, reigned 1336−87), John I (reigned 1387−95), and Martin I (called Martin the Humane, reigned 1396−1410), most of the minstrels came from Germany, Flanders, France, England, Italy, and Castile. The monarchs of the royal house of Catalonia-Aragon were considered among the most outstanding patrons in the ...
January 13, 889. Consecration
In the ninth century, the castle of Tona, located on the plain of Vic in eastern Catalonia, guarded the surrounding territory and defended it from possible Saracen attacks during the struggle with the Muslims for control of Spain. The Church of Saint Andrew was built close to the castle by the village inhabitants. They provided it with ornaments, books, and liturgical objects, and supplied it with houses and lands for its upkeep. The bishop of Vic, called Gotmar, consecrated the church in 888 and gave to it a nearby house ...
Barcelona Songbook
The musical sources that have come down to us from the Renaissance are mostly collections of polyphonic songs, works that collect the repertoire of the time and that bear witness to the confluence of several cultures. Well-known songbooks include those associated with the Palacio, with the Duke of Calabria (also called the Uppsala Songbook), with Montecasino, and, in this case, with Barcelona. Cançoner de Barcelona (Songbook of Barcelona), manuscript M 454 in the Biblioteca de Catalunya, is the most important Renaissance musical source from the court of Aragon and one ...
Selections from "Suite Iberia"
Isaac Albéniz (1860−1909) was the first composer to value and promote Spanish music as universal music beyond the national sphere. Iberia, a set of 12 compositions for piano published in four books, is Albéniz’s most representative work. Its earlier title was Espagne, and it sometimes is called Suite Iberia, based on the fact that the orchestration of these pieces was gathered in four suites. The series for piano was composed in Paris and Nice, where the Albéniz family lived between December 1905 and January 1908. The work was ...
Music for the Feast of Saint George
During the 1432 session of the General Court of the Principality of Catalonia, held in Barcelona, it was decided that a chapel to Saint George should be constructed at the Palau de la Diputació del General (Palace of the Principality of Catalonia, now called Palau de Generalitat de Catalunya, or Palace of Government of Catalonia). Saint George is the patron saint of the Diputació del General. At the end of the 16th century, the new chapel—today known as Saint George’s Hall—was built in order to accommodate the ...
Orestes 338-44
This Greek text on papyrus, written around 200 BC in Hermopolis, Egypt, has seven lines of writing containing parts of verses 338–344 from the first chorus of Orestes. Composed in 408 BC by the Greek tragedian Euripides (circa 480 BC–406 BC), the play recounts the story of Orestes, who kills his mother Clytaemnestra to avenge the death of his father, Agamemnon, and is pursued by the Furies for this deed. In addition to a passage of a chorus song (stasimon), the fragment contains vocal and instrumental symbols written ...
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