31 results in English
Antiphonary
This antiphonary (a book containing the choral parts of the Holy Office) was transferred to the Biblioteca comunale degli Intronati di Siena in 1811 from its place of origin, the Augustinian monastery of San Salvatore in Lecceto near Siena. By virtue of its specific liturgical function, the antiphonary, designed for the use of the monastic community, contains both the daytime and the nocturnal services. It was illuminated in 1442 as part of an extensive artistic program within the monastery promoted under priors Bartolomeo Tolomei and Girolamo Buonsignori. A bull by ...
A Handbook on Theoretical and Practical Music
This 1825 manuscript, prepared for a print edition, is a handbook on theoretical and practical music, written in Katharevousa, a purist form of Modern Greek developed in the early 19th century and at that time widely used for literary and official purposes. The work is an introduction to the Byzantine notation for the liturgical chant used in the Greek Orthodox Church that most likely was intended for students of Byzantine ecclesiastical music. The text probably was written by a scribe named Basileios Nikolaḯdes Byzantios. On the first page, which is ...
Albéniz. Variations for T.R.M.
Albéniz. Variaciones para S.A.R. (Albéniz. Variations for T.R.M.) is an album of music by Pedro Albéniz (1795−1855) composed between 1820 and 1850 for Their Royal Majesties, meaning the Spanish monarchs Ferdinand VII and his elder daughter, the future Isabella II. Albéniz was piano tutor to Isabella before her majority and to her younger sister, Infanta Maria Luisa Fernanda, later duchess of Monpensier. The volume is bound in regal red leather, stamped in gold, with the crown on the cover. It contains 24 handwritten scores, including ...
The Uganda Journal, Volume 31, Part 2, 1967
The Uganda Literary and Scientific Society was established at Entebbe, Uganda Protectorate, in 1923. Its main activity consisted of the reading of papers and the delivery of lectures on topics relating to Uganda. In 1933 the society moved its headquarters to Kampala and decided to issue a regular publication, The Uganda Journal. The journal’s declared aim was “to collect and publish information which may add to our knowledge of Uganda and to record that which in the course of time might be lost.” Four issues per year were published ...
The Reapers
Els Segadors (The reapers) was declared in 1993 by the parliament of Catalonia, an autonomous region within Spain, to be the official anthem of the region. This hymn was not written for any particular purpose; rather, it was the product of the long historical evolution of a popular song. The words to the song go back to an historical event, the Reapers' War that began in 1640, when 1,000 laborers entered Barcelona on Corpus Christi Day, using their sickles as weapons. The revolt was a response to the abuses ...
Missa Barcelona. Ars Nova
In the middle of the 14th century, foreign minstrels and chanters in the service of the royal house of Catalonia-Aragon introduced new musical styles into the country. During the reigns of Peter IV of Aragon (Peter III in the principality of Catalonia, reigned 1336−87), John I (reigned 1387−95), and Martin I (called Martin the Humane, reigned 1396−1410), most of the minstrels came from Germany, Flanders, France, England, Italy, and Castile. The monarchs of the royal house of Catalonia-Aragon were considered among the most outstanding patrons in the ...
La Renaxensa, Volume 1, Number 1, 1 February 1871
La Renaixensa was the first periodical written entirely in Catalan since 1714, when King Philip V of Spain banned the language. La Renaixensa (La Renaxensa between 1871 and 1876) takes its name from the movement that was born at the end of 18th century and early in the 19th with the cautious writing of some works in Catalan. The magazine was founded in 1871 as a literary magazine and appeared twice a month. Two years later it began to include political articles, which led to it being suspended in 1878 ...
Tango of the Car
“Tango del automóvil” (Tango of the car) is a 7-inch (17.78-centimeter) diameter disc, recorded on one side. On the back is the inscription "Reproduced in Hanover," where a large collection of Spanish master records by the Gramophone Company Limited was gathered. In his unpublished work The Gramophone Company Limited: His Master’s Voice: The Spanish Catalogue (Including Portuguese Recordings), Alan Kelly lists this disc as catalog number 2084 in the “Male solo voice records” category. According to Kelly, the recording was made by Charles Scheuplein, a professional associated with ...
January 13, 889. Consecration
In the ninth century, the castle of Tona, located on the plain of Vic in eastern Catalonia, guarded the surrounding territory and defended it from possible Saracen attacks during the struggle with the Muslims for control of Spain. The Church of Saint Andrew was built close to the castle by the village inhabitants. They provided it with ornaments, books, and liturgical objects, and supplied it with houses and lands for its upkeep. The bishop of Vic, called Gotmar, consecrated the church in 888 and gave to it a nearby house ...
Barcelona Songbook
The musical sources that have come down to us from the Renaissance are mostly collections of polyphonic songs, works that collect the repertoire of the time and that bear witness to the confluence of several cultures. Well-known songbooks include those associated with the Palacio, with the Duke of Calabria (also called the Uppsala Songbook), with Montecasino, and, in this case, with Barcelona. Cançoner de Barcelona (Songbook of Barcelona), manuscript M 454 in the Biblioteca de Catalunya, is the most important Renaissance musical source from the court of Aragon and one ...
Selections from "Suite Iberia"
Isaac Albéniz (1860−1909) was the first composer to value and promote Spanish music as universal music beyond the national sphere. Iberia, a set of 12 compositions for piano published in four books, is Albéniz’s most representative work. Its earlier title was Espagne, and it sometimes is called Suite Iberia, based on the fact that the orchestration of these pieces was gathered in four suites. The series for piano was composed in Paris and Nice, where the Albéniz family lived between December 1905 and January 1908. The work was ...
Music for the Feast of Saint George
During the 1432 session of the General Court of the Principality of Catalonia, held in Barcelona, it was decided that a chapel to Saint George should be constructed at the Palau de la Diputació del General (Palace of the Principality of Catalonia, now called Palau de Generalitat de Catalunya, or Palace of Government of Catalonia). Saint George is the patron saint of the Diputació del General. At the end of the 16th century, the new chapel—today known as Saint George’s Hall—was built in order to accommodate the ...
Antiphonary
This document is a fragment of an antiphonary of unknown provenance, dating from the 12th century. It is written in Caroline minuscule. The initial letter “S” is an example of Romanesque codex painting. The scribe and the illuminator are unknown. The script is stylized into a band of palmette decoration. It is difficult to determine precisely the  historical context of the fragment, which could either have been produced in the Rhineland (Cologne) or the Danube River valley (Salzburg). The musical notation represents the German neume notation of the Salzburg circle ...
Contributed by Slovak National Library
Antiphonarium Bratislaviense
This illuminated folio with Metz Gothic musical notation comes from the liturgical codex of Canon Jan Han, who was a client of the Bratislava Chapter and the purchaser of this antiphonary. The illuminated initial “S” (Sanctum) with the first two martyrs of the Christian Church, Saint Stephen and Saint Lawrence, accompanied by Saint Vitus, is supplemented by the label Illorum effusus nos in patientia firmet (Their patience enabled us to stream forth), which dates the fragment to 1487. The bottom part of the acanthus decoration on the left margin contains ...
Contributed by Slovak National Library
Passional of the Venerable Lord for the Convent of Žilina (The Passional of Žilina)
Passionale Domini Venerabilis Conventvs Solnensis (Passional of the venerable lord for the Convent of Žilina), commonly known as the Passional of Žilina, contains a number of manuscript musical works. Included here are two compendia. In the first, Harmonia pastoralis (Shepherd's harmony), are two Latin-Slovak Christmas masses with Slovak folk pastorales and carols, and the Latin antiphon "Tota pulchra" (All beautiful). In the second, Prosae pastorales (Pastor's songs), are carols and pastorales for Christmas, New Year, and Epiphany, including the well-known carol “Do lesa, do hory valasi” (Into the ...
Contributed by Slovak National Library
Haydn’s Symphony in C, Number 48 (Maria Theresia Symphony)
Presented here is a manuscript transcription of the Symphony Number 48, commonly known as the Maria Theresia Symphony, by Joseph Haydn (1732−1809). The original of the composition was not preserved in Haydn’s own hand, but this manuscript was created by the composer’s most important copyist, Joseph Elssler (died 1782). It dates from 1769 and is the oldest known manuscript of this composition. The date of the document proves that Haydn did not compose this work on the occasion of the visit of Empress Maria Theresia to the ...
Contributed by Slovak National Library
Choral Collection with Masses from the Josquin des Prez Period
This choir book with masses from the Low Countries and Burgundy—including a mass by Josquin des Prez (circa 1440−1521)—was made for the Count Palatine, later Elector Palatine, Ottheinrich. The contents are a selection from the repertoire of the Munich court music under its first great music director and reorganizer, Ludwig Senfl (circa 1486−1542 or 43), a pupil of Heinrich Isaak. On folio 1 are the arms of Ottheinrich; on folios 2 verso and 124 verso are initials with portraits of the count and his wife Susanna ...
Contributed by Bavarian State Library
Montreal Organ Book
The Livre d’orgue de Montréal (Montreal organ book) is the largest extant manuscript of French organ music of the period of Louis XIV (reigned 1643−1715). Labeled “Pièces d’orgue” (Organ pieces) on the spine, the 540-page book is comprised of 40 separate quires, or collections of leaves. The book has no table of contents or indication of composer, but 16 of its 398 pieces have been attributed to Nicolas Lebègue (1631–1702), organist to the king in France. Among Lebègue’s pieces in the manuscript are the “Tierces ...
Traditional Bajan Music
This photograph shows drummers and flute players in a local band playing traditional folk music in a parade in Barbados, with a large crowd in the background. The parade is part of the five-week summer Crop Over festival, the most popular and colorful festival in Barbados. Its origins can be traced to the 1780s, when Barbados was a prolific sugar producer. At the end of each season, there was a huge celebration to mark the culmination of another successful sugar cane harvest, the “crop over” celebration. The photograph is from ...
Playing the Marimba
This photograph from Costa Rica shows a marimba player accompanied by two guitarists. The marimba, believed to have originated in southern Africa, was brought to South America in the early 16th century by Africans taken there as slaves. In the 1890s, the Guatemalan marimba builder Sebastian Hurtado made an instrument with a wooden resonator pipe instead of a gourd, an innovation that formed the basis of the modern marimba. The photograph is from the collection of the Columbus Memorial Library of the Organization of American States (OAS), which includes 45 ...
Conga Drums at Carnival Time
This photograph from Cuba shows a group of male revelers in traditional costumes and large sombreros, with various types of drums and other musical instruments, in a Conga line. The conga is a dance that originated in Cuba, and in which the participants form a winding line, take three steps forwards or backwards, and then kick. The photograph is from the collection of the Columbus Memorial Library of the Organization of American States (OAS), which includes 45,000 photographs illustrative of life and culture in the Americas. Many of the ...
Musicians Playing the Marimba
This photograph from Guatemala shows a group of indigenous musicians playing a marimba. The marimba, believed to have originated in southern Africa, was brought to South America in the early 16th century by Africans taken there as slaves. In the 1890s, the Guatemalan marimba builder Sebastian Hurtado made an instrument with a wooden resonator pipe instead of a gourd, an innovation that formed the basis of the modern marimba. The photograph is from the collection of the Columbus Memorial Library of the Organization of American States (OAS), which includes 45 ...
Playing the Marimba
This photograph from Guatemala shows an indigenous musician playing a marimba made from gourds of different sizes. Two young girls are holding the instrument. The marimba, believed to have originated in southern Africa, was brought to South America in the early 16th century by Africans taken there as slaves. In the 1890s, the Guatemalan marimba builder Sebastian Hurtado made an instrument with a wooden resonator pipe instead of a gourd, an innovation that formed the basis of the modern marimba. The photograph is from the collection of the Columbus Memorial ...
Native Orchestra, Marimba
This photograph from Guatemala shows indigenous musicians playing two different types of marimbas, drums, a violin, and a harmonica. The photograph is from the collection of the Columbus Memorial Library of the Organization of American States (OAS), which includes 45,000 photographs illustrative of life and culture in the Americas. Many of the photographs were taken by prominent photographers on OAS missions to member countries. The OAS was established in April 1948 when 21 countries of the western hemisphere adopted the OAS Charter, in which they reaffirmed their commitment to ...
Native Drummers
This photograph from Haiti shows two drummers playing on elaborately-decorated drums. The photograph is from the collection of the Columbus Memorial Library of the Organization of American States (OAS), which includes 45,000 photographs illustrative of life and culture in the Americas. Many of the photographs were taken by prominent photographers on OAS missions to member countries. The OAS was established in April 1948 when 21 countries of the western hemisphere adopted the OAS Charter, in which they reaffirmed their commitment to the pursuit of common goals and respect for ...
Marimba: One of the Favorites
This photograph from Honduras shows three marimba players playing one marimba, on which are painted the words "Mi Farolito," presumably the name of the instrument. The marimba, believed to have originated in southern Africa, was brought to South America in the early 16th century by Africans taken there as slaves. In the 1890s, the Guatemalan marimba builder Sebastian Hurtado made an instrument with a wooden resonator pipe instead of a gourd, an innovation that formed the basis of the modern marimba. The photograph is from the collection of the Columbus ...
Creation of the Fifth Sun Festival
The creation of the fifth sun is an important element in Aztec mythology about the origins of the world. This photograph from Mexico of a festival celebrating the creation of the fifth sun shows musicians in costume wearing distinctive headdresses. The photograph is from the collection of the Columbus Memorial Library of the Organization of American States (OAS), which includes 45,000 photographs illustrative of life and culture in the Americas. Many of the photographs were taken by prominent photographers on OAS missions to member countries. The OAS was established ...
Aucaner Signal on Apintie
This photograph from Suriname shows a Maroon in a seated position beating an apintie, a drum made out of wood and wild boar skins. Maroon refers to fugitive slaves from the West Indies and the northern part of South America, and their descendants. The Maroon community was especially numerous in Suriname, a former Dutch colony in which many slaves managed to escape to the jungle. The photograph is from the collection of the Columbus Memorial Library of the Organization of American States (OAS), which includes 45,000 photographs illustrative of ...
Steelband Playing on the Beach
This photograph from Trinidad and Tobago shows the Old Oak Starlift Steel Orchestra playing on a beach. The musicians are known as pannists. Steel pan music originated in Trinidad and Tobago. Steel pans are percussion instruments that are made of 55-gallon oil drums and tuned chromatically. The photograph is from the collection of the Columbus Memorial Library of the Organization of American States (OAS), which includes 45,000 photographs illustrative of life and culture in the Americas. Many of the photographs were taken by prominent photographers on OAS missions to ...
Polynesian Prayer
This photograph of a young Polynesian woman engaged in traditional prayer is from the state of Hawaii in the United States. The Polynesians came to Hawaii about 2,000 years ago and were the first people to inhabit the islands. The photograph is from the collection of the Columbus Memorial Library of the Organization of American States (OAS), which includes 45,000 photographs illustrative of life and culture in the Americas. Many of the photographs were taken by prominent photographers on OAS missions to member countries. The OAS was established ...
Marseillaise
Claude-Joseph Rouget de Lisle (1760-1836), a French army engineer, wrote the words and music to the “Marseillaise,” the national anthem of France, in the course of a single night in April 1792. He intended the song to be used as a marching song by the French Army as it entered the Rhineland, following the outbreak of war between France and Austria and Russia. This recording, made circa 1898-1900, is one of the earliest recordings made of the song. In 1893, Henri Lioret (1848-1938), a watchmaker by trade, developed a conical ...