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26 results
Museum: Entrance Hall, I, Algiers, Algeria
This photochrome print is from “Views of People and Sites in Algeria” in the catalog of the Detroit Photographic Company. It depicts the entrance hall and courtyard of a museum in Algiers--most likely the Musée National des Antiquités Algeriennes, opened in 1897, and described by Baedeker’s The Mediterranean (1911) as “containing the finest collection of the kind in Algeria.” The Detroit Photographic Company was launched as a photographic publishing firm in the late 1890s by Detroit businessman and publisher William A. Livingstone, Jr. and photographer and photo-publisher Edwin H ...
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Skansen, Stockholm, Sweden
This late 19th-century photochrome print offers a bucolic view of the open-air museum of Skansen on Djurgården Island, a royal park situated within Stockholm. Founded in 1891, Skansen is the oldest such heritage museum in Europe, with traditional Swedish culture and wildlife exhibits, as well as log structures such as the house and barn pictured on the other side of the pond. These buildings, most of which date from the 18th and 19th centuries, were intended to display Sweden's regional diversity and rural traditions at a time of rapid ...
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Museum, Prague, Bohemia, Austro-Hungary
The National Museum of what is now the Czech Republic was founded in 1818 by Count Kašpar Maria Sternberg (1761-1838), an early scholar in the field of paleontology. The museum’s collections include millions of objects in the fields of natural history, history, art, and music. The main building, pictured here, was completed in 1891. It is located at the upper end of Wenceslas Square, one of the main squares in the city of Prague. The square is named for Saint Wenceslas, the patron saint of Bohemia.
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The Louvre, Paris, France
This photochrome print of the Louvre is part of “Views of Architecture, Monuments, and Other Sites in France” from the catalog of the Detroit Publishing Company (1905). The 1900 edition of Baedeker's Paris and its Environs, with routes from London to Paris: Handbook for Travellers characterized the Louvre as "the most important public building at Paris, both architecturally and on account of its treasures of art . . . , a palace of vast extent, rising between the Rue de Rivoli and the Seine." Baedeker explained that “it is usually supposed that Philip ...
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Royal Museum, the Court (i.e. Bargello Museum, the Courtyard), Florence, Italy
This photochrome print of the court of the Royal Museum in Florence is part of “Views of Architecture and Other Sites in Italy” from the catalog of the Detroit Publishing Company (1905). Construction of the building, which was intended to be a palace, began in 1255, based on a design by the architect Lapo Tedesco (died circa 1280). From the late 13th century to the early 16th century, the building was known as the Palazzo del Popolo (Palace of the People), and was home to the podestà, or the city ...
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Pitti Palace, Royal Residence, Florence, Italy
This photochrome print of the Palazzo Pitti in Florence is part of “Views of Architecture and Other Sites in Italy” from the catalog of the Detroit Publishing Company (1905). Situated on the south side of the Arno River, the palace was designed by the Renaissance architect Filippo Brunelleschi (1377–1466) around 1458, for Luca Pitti (1398-1472), a friend and servant of the Medici family. The palace was still unfinished when Pitti died. In 1550, nearly 80 years after Pitti's death, Eleonora de Toledo, the wife of Grand Duke Cosimo ...
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Etruscan Vases in the Hermitage in Saint Petersburg
At the beginning of the 20th century, the Russian photographer Sergei Mikhailovich Prokudin-Gorskii (1863–1944) used a special color photography process to create a visual record of the Russian Empire. Some of Prokudin-Gorskii’s photographs date from about 1905, but the bulk of his work is from between 1909 and 1915, when, with the support of Tsar Nicholas II and the Ministry of Transportation, he undertook extended trips through many different parts of the empire.
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Etruscan Vases in the Hermitage in Saint Petersburg
Shown here from behind is an Etruscan vase in the form of a sphinx as portrayed in Greek art: the head of a woman on the body of a lion, with the wings of a giant bird. The item was photograped in the Hermitage Museum, but the date of this photograph is not known. The photographer lived in Saint Petersburg and could have been taken it at any point during his professional career in that city, from 1901 until 1918. The image is by Russian photographer Sergei Mikhailovich Prokudin-Gorskii (1863 ...
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Etruscan Vases in the Hermitage in Saint Petersburg
Produced under the influence of Greek art from the seventh to the fourth ceturies BCE, Etruscan vases occupied one of the most magnificent halls in the New Hermitage, the Hall of Graeco-Etruscan Vases. The bulk of the collection, which numbers some 1,300 items, was purchased in Rome in 1834 and originally displayed at the Imperial Academy of the Arts. With the completion of the New Hermitage in 1851, the collection was transferred to a temple-like setting at the end of the west enfilade. Shown here is a vase in ...
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Etruscan Vases in the Hermitage in Saint Petersburg
Produced under the influence of Greek art from the seventy to the fourth ceturies BCE, Etruscan vases occupied one of the most magnificent halls in the New Hermitage, the Hall of Graeco-Etruscan Vases. The bulk of the collection, which numbers some 1,300 items, was purchased in Rome in 1834 and originally displayed at the Imperial Academy of the Arts. With the completion of the New Hermitage in 1851, the collection was transferred to a temple-like setting at the end of the west enfilade. Shown in this side view is ...
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Etruscan Vases in the Hermitage in Saint Petersburg
Produced under the influence of Greek art from the seventh to the fourth centuries BCE, richly colored Etruscan vases occupied one of the most magnificent halls in the New Hermitage, the Hall of Graeco-Etruscan Vases. With the completion of the New Hermitage in 1851, the collection was transferred from the Imperial Academy of the Arts to a temple-like setting at the end of the west enfilade. Seen here is the head and bust of a Maenad, one of the ecstatic female followers of Bacchus, the god of wine. The bust ...
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Skeleton of Large-Horned Stag in the Museum of the City of Ekaterinburg
At the beginning of the 20th century, the Russian photographer Sergei Mikhailovich Prokudin-Gorskii (1863–1944) used a special color photography process to create a visual record of the Russian Empire. Some of Prokudin-Gorskii’s photographs date from about 1905, but the bulk of his work is from between 1909 and 1915, when, with the support of Tsar Nicholas II and the Ministry of Transportation, he undertook extended trips through many different parts of the empire.
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Weapons Cabinet in the Arsenal Museum of the Zlatoust Plant
At the beginning of the 20th century, the Russian photographer Sergei Mikhailovich Prokudin-Gorskii (1863–1944) used a special color photography process to create a visual record of the Russian Empire. Some of Prokudin-Gorskii’s photographs date from about 1905, but the bulk of his work is from between 1909 and 1915, when, with the support of Tsar Nicholas II and the Ministry of Transportation, he undertook extended trips through many different parts of the empire.
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General View of a Hall in the Arsenal Museum of the Zlatoust Plant
At the beginning of the 20th century, the Russian photographer Sergei Mikhailovich Prokudin-Gorskii (1863–1944) used a special color photography process to create a visual record of the Russian Empire. Some of Prokudin-Gorskii’s photographs date from about 1905, but the bulk of his work is from between 1909 and 1915, when, with the support of Tsar Nicholas II and the Ministry of Transportation, he undertook extended trips through many different parts of the empire.
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In the Borodino Museum. Borodino
At the beginning of the 20th century, the Russian photographer Sergei Mikhailovich Prokudin-Gorskii (1863–1944) used a special color photography process to create a visual record of the Russian Empire. Some of Prokudin-Gorskii’s photographs date from about 1905, but the bulk of his work is from between 1909 and 1915, when, with the support of Tsar Nicholas II and the Ministry of Transportation, he undertook extended trips through many different parts of the empire.
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In the Borodino Museum. Borodino
At the beginning of the 20th century, the Russian photographer Sergei Mikhailovich Prokudin-Gorskii (1863–1944) used a special color photography process to create a visual record of the Russian Empire. Some of Prokudin-Gorskii’s photographs date from about 1905, but the bulk of his work is from between 1909 and 1915, when, with the support of Tsar Nicholas II and the Ministry of Transportation, he undertook extended trips through many different parts of the empire.
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Inside the Belaia Palata (White Palace) Museum. Rostov Velikii
At the beginning of the 20th century, the Russian photographer Sergei Mikhailovich Prokudin-Gorskii (1863–1944) used a special color photography process to create a visual record of the Russian Empire. Some of Prokudin-Gorskii’s photographs date from about 1905, but the bulk of his work is from between 1909 and 1915, when, with the support of Tsar Nicholas II and the Ministry of Transportation, he undertook extended trips through many different parts of the empire.
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Museum. Iona's Room. Rostov Velikii
At the beginning of the 20th century, the Russian photographer Sergei Mikhailovich Prokudin-Gorskii (1863–1944) used a special color photography process to create a visual record of the Russian Empire. Some of Prokudin-Gorskii’s photographs date from about 1905, but the bulk of his work is from between 1909 and 1915, when, with the support of Tsar Nicholas II and the Ministry of Transportation, he undertook extended trips through many different parts of the empire.
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Library of Congress
Museum. Iona's Room. Rostov Velikii
At the beginning of the 20th century, the Russian photographer Sergei Mikhailovich Prokudin-Gorskii (1863–1944) used a special color photography process to create a visual record of the Russian Empire. Some of Prokudin-Gorskii’s photographs date from about 1905, but the bulk of his work is from between 1909 and 1915, when, with the support of Tsar Nicholas II and the Ministry of Transportation, he undertook extended trips through many different parts of the empire.
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Library of Congress
Museum of Tobolsk
At the beginning of the 20th century, the Russian photographer Sergei Mikhailovich Prokudin-Gorskii (1863–1944) used a special color photography process to create a visual record of the Russian Empire. Some of Prokudin-Gorskii’s photographs date from about 1905, but the bulk of his work is from between 1909 and 1915, when, with the support of Tsar Nicholas II and the Ministry of Transportation, he undertook extended trips through many different parts of the empire.
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Three Mannequins of Women in Elaborate Dresses, on Wooden Stands
The Tver Museum, located in the region of Tver, an ancient city (first mentioned in the historical record in 1135) on the Volga River to the northwest of Moscow, opened in 1866. The museum displayed natural and archeological items of interest from the area, as well as works of art and crafts. Seen here are three mannequins of women in traditional Russian dress with elaborate embroidery and lacework. In the center is an example of a type of sleeveless dress (sarafan), with a brightly patterned cloak. The mannequins wear elaborate ...
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