40 results
Samarkand. Portion of Shir-Dar Minaret and Its Dome with Tillia-Kari
At the center of Samarkand is the Registan complex, composed of three major monuments of the madrasah (religious school). Seen here is the Shir Dar Madrasah, built in 1619–36 during the Bukhara Ashtrakhanid dynasty. This view shows part of the main facade and imposing entrance arch, or iwan (on right), with a flanking minaret, behind which is a ribbed dome over an instruction hall. Despite structural damage, the ceramic work is relatively well preserved. The minaret displays geometric figures integrated with words in block Kufic script from the Kalima ...
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Tillia Kari from Ulugh Beg. Samarkand
In the center of Samarkand is the Registan complex, consisting of three major examples of the madrasah (religious school). The third of these, the Tillia Kari Madrasah, was built in 1646–60 on the site of a former caravansarai. Its basic plan is formed by a rectangular courtyard, shown here with two stories composed of arcades of pointed arches that frame rooms for scholars. Although much damaged, the facades are profusely decorated with intricate ceramic work in geometric and floral patterns. On the far left is a corner of the ...
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Study in Shah-i Zindah Mosque. Samarkand
The necropolis of Shah-i Zindah (Persian for “living king”) was revered as a memorial to Kusam-ibn-Abbas, a cousin of the Prophet Mohammad. Shown in this photographic detail (what the photographer called an “etude”) is apparently a structure known simply as the Octahedron, in the middle group of mausolea. Ceramic tiles decorate the surface both inside and out. Above the pointed arch are remnants of a floral pattern in faience. Visible through the doorway are red poppies in profuse bloom, which cover the hillside on which the Shah-i Zindah ensemble complex ...
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Mirza Ulugh Beg. Registan. Samarkand
In the center of Samarkand is the Registan complex, consisting of three examples of the madrasah (religious schools). The oldest component is the Ulugh Beg Madrasah, built in 1417–20 by the scholar King Ulugh Beg (1393?–1449; grandson of Timur). Shown here is the main facade with the great iwan arch at the entrance. The facade displays remnants of polychrome ceramic ornamentation, including panels of geometric and botanical motifs, and a vertical Perso-Arabic inscription band. The walls also display monumental geometric tile figures, within which are patterns of block ...
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Inside Shir-Dar Mosque. Samarkand
In the center of Samarkand is the Registan complex, consisting of three madrasah (religious schools). The second madrasah is the Shir-Dar, was built in 1619–36 during the Bukhara Astrakhanid dynasty. Rectangular in plan, the two-story arcaded structure contained scholars’ cells along an interior courtyard. This view shows the northwest corner of the yard, with a ribbed dome over an instruction hall. Despite losses in this active seismic zone, the surface displays profuse ceramic decoration that includes geometric and botanical motifs, as well as a vertical Perso-Arabic inscription band. Visible ...
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Tillia Kari from Registan Square. Samarkand
In the center of Samarkand is the Registan complex, consisting of three madrasah (religious schools). The third of these, the Tillia Kari Madrasah, was built in 1646–60 on the site of a former caravansarai. Its basic plan is formed by a rectangular courtyard, bounded by arcades that contain rooms for scholars. Although much damaged, the facades still show intricate ceramic decoration in geometric and botanical motifs, as well as panels with Perso-Arabic inscriptions above the door of each cell. The corner minaret displays geometric tile patterns with block Kufic ...
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Portion of Entrance Door on Right Side of Tillia-Kari. Samarkand
In the center of Samarkand is the Registan complex, composed of three major examples of the madrasah (religious school). The third Registan component, the Tilla Kari Madrasah, was built in 1646–60 on the site of a former caravansarai. Shown here is the right half of an imposing entrance (on the building’s right side, according to caption), set within a peshtak (entrance arch). The door contains an inscription panel with cursive Perso-Arabic script and two panels of intricate wooden relief carving. The entrance is framed by tiles in a ...
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Inside Tillia Kari Courtyard. Detail on Right Side. Samarkand
In the center of Samarkand is the Registan complex, consisting of three madrasah (religious schools). The third of these, the Tillia Kari Madrasah, was built in 1646–60 on the site of a former caravansarai. Its basic plan is formed by a rectangular courtyard, bounded by arcades that contain rooms for scholars. Although much damaged, the facades show profuse ceramic decoration in geometric and botanical motifs, as well as panels with Perso-Arabic inscriptions above the door of each cell. Seen here is a detail of a cell facade inside the ...
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View of Samarkand from Tillia Kari
In the center of Samarkand is the Registan complex, consisting of three madrasah (religious schools). The third of these, the Tillia Kari Madrasah, was built in 1646–60 on the site of a former caravansarai. Its plan is formed by a rectangular courtyard, bounded by arcades that contain rooms for scholars. This view, taken from the two-story main facade, looks in the opposite direction from the square toward the adobe houses in the city. On the left is one of the four iwan arches that define the main axes of ...
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Detail of a Wall in Ulugh Beg (Interior). Samarkand
In the town center in Samarkand is the Registan complex, composed of three major examples of the madrasah (religious school). The oldest madrasah on Registan Square is named after the astronomer king Ulugh Beg (1393?–1449; grandson of Timur), who built it in 1417–20. During Ulugh Beg’s reign some 100 students attended this leading center of Islamic education. The ceramic panels shown here are from the courtyard niche of the great iwan arch. The delicate polychrome work includes faience tiles with intricate botanical figures. These are set within ...
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Detail of Ulugh Beg (to the Right of the Entrance). Samarkand
At the center of Samarkand is the Registan complex, composed of three major madrasahs (religious schools). The oldest madrasah on Registan Square is named after the astronomer king Ulugh Beg (1393?–1449; grandson of Timur), who built it in 1417–20. During his reign some 100 students attended this center of Islamic education. Seen here is the upper part of the interior courtyard facade to the left of the main entrance arch. The courtyard was enclosed with two levels of recessed, arched bays that contained rooms for scholars. This view ...
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Detail of Shir-Dar (inside, to the Right of the Entrance). Samarkand
In the center of Samarkand is the Registan complex, consisting of three madrasah (religious schools). The second madrasah is the Shir-Dar, built in 1619–36 during the Bukhara Astrakhanid dynasty. Rectangular in plan, the two-story arcaded structure contained scholars’ cells along an interior courtyard. This view shows the remarkable ceramic decoration on the courtyard side of the main iwan arch. Panels of Perso-Arabic inscriptions in the cursive Naskh manner are set within strips of floral motifs. Especially notable is the faience mosaic in the center, with a vase supporting the ...
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Right Dome of Shir-Dar Mosque. Samarkand
In the center of Samarkand is the Registan complex, consisting of three madrasah (religious schools). The second of these, the Shir-Dar Madrasah, was built in 1619–36 during the Bukhara Astrakhanid dynasty. This view from the interior courtyard parapet shows the ribbed dome over an instruction hall at the southwest corner. Despite losses in this active seismic zone, the surface displays lavish ceramic decoration that includes geometric and botanical motifs, as well as a horizontal Perso-Arabic inscription band. Uzbek craftsmen restored the ceramic tiles on the dome during the Soviet ...
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Wall and Column above Shir-Dar. Samarkand
In the center of Samarkand is the Registan complex, consisting of three madrasah (religious schools). The second of these, the Shir-Dar Madrasah, was built in 1619–36 during the Bukhara Astrakhanid dynasty. This view from the parapet of the two-story structure shows a section of the side of the main facade, which contains the great iwan arch. The surface seen here is covered in geometric patterns formed by simple azure and blue glazed tiles. The attached column at the left corner displays geometric tile figures within which are patterns of ...
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On the Registan. Samarkand
In the center of Samarkand is the Registan complex, consisting of three madrasah (religious schools). The second of these, the Shir-Dar Madrasah, was built in 1619–36. This view from Registan Square shows a group of turbaned mullahs and youths on the steps in front of the main facade, which contains the great iwan arch. (The left flank of the arch is brightly lit.) In the center is a large niche containing a partially blocked lattice window, with decorative panels containing floral and geometric figures on either side. Above the ...
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Rear of Shah-i Zindah Mosque. Samarkand
The Shah-i Zindah Necropolis is located at the outskirts of Samarkand (present-day Uzbekistan). Placed on an ancient burial ground, Shah-i Zindah (Persian for “living king”) is revered as a memorial to Kusam-ibn-Abbas, a cousin of the Prophet Mohammad. Shown here is the back facade of the domed Khodzha Akhmad Mausoleum built in the mid 14th century for a local spiritual leader. Located at the end of the necropolis in the northern cluster of shrines, this damaged monument contains bright ceramic work with floral, geometric, and inscriptional patterns. The walls of ...
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Outside View of the Passage of the Dead, from the Left. Samarkand
The Shah-i Zindah (Persian for “living king”) necropolis is located at the outskirts of Samarkand. Situated on an ancient burial ground, it is revered as a memorial to Kusam-ibn-Abbas, a cousin of the Prophet Muhammad. Although the photographer’s caption is imprecise, this view appears to show the northeast corner of a small madrasah built in 1812–13 by Davlat Kushbegi on the east side of the darvozakhana (main entrance) to Shah-i Zindah. The adobe brick wall on the left has glazed inserted ornaments. The corner is covered with polychrome ...
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Mosaics on the Shah-i Zindah Walls. Samarkand
The Shah-i Zindah (Persian for “living king”) necropolis is located at the outskirts of Samarkand. Situated on an ancient burial ground, it is revered as a memorial to Kusam-ibn-Abbas, a cousin of the Prophet Muhammad. Shown here is the facade of the peshtak (entrance arch) of the Shirin Bika Aga Mausoleum, built in 1385—86 for the younger sister of Timur (Tamerlane). Despite significant damage, the surface displays profuse ceramic ornamentation with Persian influence, including early examples of composite mosaics. Above the portal is an inscriptional panel in Thuluth cursive ...
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Mosaics on the Shah-i Zindah Walls. Samarkand
The Shah-i Zindah (Persian for “living king”) necropolis is located at the outskirts of Samarkand. Situated on an ancient burial ground, it is revered as a memorial to Kusam-ibn-Abbas, a cousin of the Prophet Muhammad. Shown here is the facade within the portal arch of the Tuman-Aka khanaka, built in 1405 near the Kusam-ibn-Abbas shrine as part of a memorial to the youngest wife of Timur (Tamerlane). The facade is distinguished by lively ceramic ornamentation with interlocking geometric patterns. At the center is a ten-pointed radiating star motif in faience ...
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Mosaics on the Shah-i Zindah Walls. Samarkand
Among the greatest examples of Islamic art in Samarkand is the Gur-Emir ("tomb of the ruler") complex. The shrine was begun by Timur (Tamerlane) in 1403 in memory of his grandson Muhammad Sultan. Following Timur's own death in 1405, his body was placed in the structure, which became the Timurid Mausoleum. It was completed by another of Timur's grandsons, the astronomer-king Ulugh Beg. Shown here is a facade detail within the arch of the main entrance structure. The rich polychrome ceramic work in a Persian style includes geometric ...
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Mosaics on the Shah-i Zindah Walls. Samarkand
The Shah-i Zindah (Persian for “living king”) necropolis is located at the outskirts of Samarkand. Situated on an ancient burial ground, it is revered as a memorial to Kusam-ibn-Abbas, a cousin of the Prophet Muhammad. Shown here is the portal of the mausoleum of Shadi-Mulk Aga, built in 1372 for the burial of Uldjai Shadi-Mulk, daughter of Tamerlane's elder sister Kutlug-Turkan-aga. The portal is set within a peshtak  (entrance arch), the facades of which display a remarkable array of ceramic work, including majolica tiles and rosettes, as well as ...
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