131 results in English
Art of Ancient Rus’-Ukraine
This book is a short history of the art of Ancient Rus’, the medieval polity centered on Kiev, which flourished from the 9th to the 13th centuries, and which formed the basis for much of later Russian and Ukrainian culture. Topics covered include the influences of the Varangians and of Eastern Orthodoxy, the importance of Christianity, wooden architecture, churches and monasteries in Kiev, art and architecture in the historic city of Chernigov, and the arts of enamel and icon painting. Particular attention is paid to Saint Sophia Cathedral in Kiev ...
Kiev Caves and the Kiev-Pechersk Lavra
This book, published in Kiev in 1864, is a history and description of Kiev-Pechersk Lavra, also called the Monastery of the Kiev Caves (pechera means cave; lavra indicates a monastery of status), a large complex founded in 1051 by a monk named Anthony in caves dug out of the hillside. The monastery soon became the center of Christianity in Russia and played an important part in local cultural development, housing the first printing press in Kiev and famous chroniclers, writers, physicians, scientists, and artists. Kiev-Pechersk Lavra is the most important ...
A Description of Kiev-Pechersk Lavra
This book, published in 1826 at the press of the Kiev-Pechersk Lavra Monastery, is a comprehensive account of the monastery and its establishment. Kiev-Pechersk Lavra, also called the Monastery of the Kiev Caves (pechera means cave; lavra indicates a monastery of status), is a large complex founded in 1051 by a monk named Anthony in caves dug out of the hillside. The monastery soon became central to Christianity in Russia and to local cultural development, supporting writers, physicians, scientists, and artists. After a fire in 1718, most of the lavra ...
Fathers of the Solovetsky Monastery and Their Sufferings
This manuscript was made around 1800 by an often-persecuted group of Russian Christians, the Old Believers. Because books were frequently confiscated from this group and its members were denied the use of printing presses, they continued to write important books such as this one by hand. This text chronicles and illustrates the story of a group of monks at the Solovetsky Monastery who opposed the controversial reforms introduced by Nikon (Patriarch of Moscow, 1652−58) and who endured a siege of eight years (1668−76) before they were finally betrayed ...
Contributed by Walters Art Museum
Monastery, Canal (19th Century), Solovetskii Island, Russia
This photograph of a canal on Large Solovetskii Island was taken in 1998 by Dr. William Brumfield, American photographer and historian of Russian architecture, as part of the "Meeting of Frontiers" project at the Library of Congress. Situated in the southwestern part of the White Sea, the island and its archipelago are the site of the Transfiguration-Solovetskii Monastery, one of the most revered monastic institutions in Russia. Founded as early as 1429 by the monk Savvatii, the monastery experienced its greatest development in the second half of the 16th century ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Monastery, Cathedral of the Transfiguration of the Savior (1558-1566), Northwest View with Gallery (1602), and Church of St. Nicholas (1832-1834) Solovetskii Island, Russia
This photograph of the central ensemble of the Transfiguration-Solovetskii Monastery was taken in 1998 by Dr. William Brumfield, American photographer and historian of Russian architecture, as part of the "Meeting of Frontiers" project at the Library of Congress. Located on Large Solovetskii Island, part of an archipelago in the White Sea, the monastery was founded as early as 1429 by the monk Savvatii. Following his death in 1435, the enterprise was revived by the monk Zosima in 1436. After decades of tenuous existence, the remote monastery greatly expanded in the ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Nativity-St. Ferapont Monastery, Southwest View, Ferapontovo, Russia
This photograph of the main ensemble at the Ferapontov-Nativity of the Virgin Monastery was taken in 1998 by Dr. William Brumfield, American photographer and historian of Russian architecture, as part of the “Meeting of Frontiers" project at the Library of Congress. Located near the Sheksna River in the central part of Vologda Province, the Ferapontov-Nativity Monastery was founded in 1398 on the shores of Lake Borodava by Ferapont, a monk of noble birth from Moscow. The center of the monastery is the Cathedral of the Nativity of the Virgin, built ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Spaso-Evfrosinevskii Monastery for Women, Three Versts from the City of Polotsk. View from the South
At the beginning of the 20th century, the Russian photographer Sergei Mikhailovich Prokudin-Gorskii (1863–1944) used a special color photography process to create a visual record of the Russian Empire. Some of Prokudin-Gorskii’s photographs date from about 1905, but the bulk of his work is from between 1909 and 1915, when, with the support of Tsar Nicholas II and the Ministry of Transportation, he undertook extended trips through many different parts of the empire.
Contributed by Library of Congress
The Convent, Cetinje, Montenegro
This late 19th-century photochrome print is part of “Views of Montenegro” from the catalog of the Detroit Publishing Company. It depicts the Cetinje Monastery at the foot of Mount Lovćen in Cetinje. The monastery was built in 1701 by Bishop–Prince Danilo (1670–1735), the founder of the Petrović Njegoš dynasty, following the destruction by Venetian forces of the medieval Cetinje Monastery, a Serb Orthodox monastery built by Ivan the Black in 1484. The monastery has great historical significance for the Montenegrin people. It contains the remains of Saint Peter ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Archangel Michael Monastery, Archangel Cathedral (1653-56), Cupolas (Late 18th Century), West View, with Church of Pentecost (or St. Kiprian) (1710), in Foreground, Velikii Ustiug, Russia
This northwest view of the monastic Cathedral (sobor) of Archangel Michael in Velikii Ustiug (Vologda Oblast) was taken in 1996 by Dr. William Brumfield, American photographer and historian of Russian architecture, as part of the "Meeting of Frontiers" project at the Library of Congress. Settled by Russians as early as the 12th century, Velikii Ustiug rapidly became a center of trade and missionary activity. Medieval chronicles indicate that the Archangel Michael Monastery, one of the oldest in the Russian north, was founded by the venerable monk Kiprian in 1212. In ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Trinity-Gleden Monastery, Church of the Trinity (1659-90s), Northwest View, Velikii Ustiug, Russia
This northwest view of the Church (sobor) of the Trinity of the Trinity-Gleden Monastery (at Morozovitsa, near Velikii Ustiug, Vologda Oblast) was taken in 1998 by Dr. William Brumfield, American photographer and historian of Russian architecture, as part of the "Meeting of Frontiers" project at the Library of Congress. Settled by Russians as early as the 12th century, Velikii Ustiug rapidly became a center of trade and missionary activity. Among the beneficiaries of merchant donations was the Trinity-Gleden Monastery, located south of the town, on the opposite side of the ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Spaso-Sumorin Monastery, Church of the Ascension (1796-1801 and 1825), South Facade, Tot'ma, Russia
This south view of the Church (sobor) of the Ascension at Savior-Sumorin Monastery near Tot'ma (Vologda Oblast) was taken in 1996 by Dr. William Brumfield, American photographer and historian of Russian architecture, as part of the "Meeting of Frontiers" project at the Library of Congress. Located on the Sukhona River, Tot’ma had become a major center of salt refining by the middle of the 16th century. Monasteries in the Vologda region received tax exemptions from Moscow for salt production, and the Savior-Prilutskii Monastery sent one of its monks ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Spaso-Sumorin Monastery, Church of the Ascension (1796-1801 and 1825), Northwest View, Tot'ma, Russia
This northwest winter view of the Church (sobor) of the Ascension at Savior-Sumorin Monastery near Tot'ma (Vologda Oblast) was taken in 1998 by Dr. William Brumfield, American photographer and historian of Russian architecture, as part of the "Meeting of Frontiers" project at the Library of Congress. Located on the Sukhona River, Tot’ma had become a major center of salt refining by the middle of the 16th century. Monasteries in the Vologda area received tax exemptions from Moscow for salt production, and the Savior-Prilutskii Monastery sent one of its ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Spaso-Sumorin Monastery, Church of the Ascension (1796-1801 and 1825), East Facade, Tot'ma, Russia
This east view of the Church (sobor) of the Ascension at Savior-Sumorin Monastery near Tot'ma (Vologda Oblast) was taken in 1999 by Dr. William Brumfield, American photographer and historian of Russian architecture, as part of the "Meeting of Frontiers" project at the Library of Congress. Located on the Sukhona River, Tot’ma had become a major center of salt refining by the middle of the 16th century. Monasteries in the Vologda area received tax exemptions from Moscow for salt production, and the Savior-Prilutskii Monastery sent one of its monks ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
St. Cyril (Kirill)-Belozersk Monastery, Southeast Panorama, with Siverskoe Lake, Kirillov, Russia
This southeast view across Lake Siverskoe of the Saint Kirill Belozersk Monastery (Vologda Oblast) was taken in 1999 by Dr. William Brumfield, American photographer and historian of Russian architecture, as part of the "Meeting of Frontiers" project at the Library of Congress. Formally dedicated to the Dormition of the Virgin, the monastery was founded in 1397 by Kirill (1337-1427), a monk of noble birth who had served at the Simonov Monastery in Moscow. The monastery's importance as a religious center and as a fortress on Muscovy's northern flank ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
St. Cyril (Kirill)-Belozersk Monastery, West Wall (1654-1680s), with Ferapontov (Moscow) Tower and Kosaia Tower (1662), Kirillov, Russia
This view of the west wall of Saint Kirill Belozersk Monastery (Vologda Oblast) was taken in 1995 by Dr. William Brumfield, American photographer and historian of Russian architecture, as part of the "Meeting of Frontiers" project at the Library of Congress. Formally dedicated to the Dormition of the Virgin, the monastery was founded in 1397 by Kirill (1337-1427), a monk of noble birth who had served at the Simonov Monastery in Moscow. The monastery's importance as a religious center and as a fortress on Muscovy's expanding northern flank ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
St. Cyril (Kirill)-Belozersk Monastery, Southwest Panorama, with Siverskoe Lake, Kirillov, Russia
This southwest view across Lake Siverskoe of the Saint Kirill Belozersk Monastery (Vologda Oblast) was taken in 1999 by Dr. William Brumfield, American photographer and historian of Russian architecture, as part of the "Meeting of Frontiers" project at the Library of Congress. Formally dedicated to the Dormition of the Virgin, the monastery was founded in 1397 by Kirill (1337-1427), a monk of noble birth who had served at the Simonov Monastery in Moscow. The monastery's importance as a religious center and as a fortress on Muscovy's northern flank ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
St. Cyril (Kirill)-Belozersk Monastery, Dormition Cathedral (1497), with Church of St. Cyril (1780s) (Left), Church of St. Vladimir (1554) (Right), and Church of St. Epiphanius (1645), East View, Kirillov, Russia
This east view of the Cathedral (sobor) of the Dormition and attached structures at the Saint Kirill Belozersk Monastery (Vologda Oblast) was taken in 1999 by Dr. William Brumfield, American photographer and historian of Russian architecture, as part of the "Meeting of Frontiers" project at the Library of Congress. Formally dedicated to the Dormition of the Virgin, the monastery was founded in 1397 by Kirill (1337-1427), a monk of noble birth from Moscow. The monastery's importance as a religious center and as a fortress on Muscovy's northern flank ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
St. Cyril (Kirill)-Belozersk Monastery, West Wall (1654-1680s), Interior View, Kirillov, Russia
This interior (east) view of the west wall of Saint Kirill Belozersk Monastery (Vologda Oblast) was taken in 1991 by Dr. William Brumfield, American photographer and historian of Russian architecture, as part of the "Meeting of Frontiers" project at the Library of Congress. Formally dedicated to the Dormition of the Virgin, the monastery was founded in 1397 by Kirill (1337-1427), a Muscovite monk canonized in 1547. The monastery had dual significance, as a major religious center and as a fortress on Muscovy's expanding northern flank. Its present brick walls ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
St. Cyril (Kirill)-Belozersk Monastery, Holy Gates (1523), with Church of St. John Climacus (1572), South View, Kirillov, Russia
This south view of the Gate Church of Saint John Climacus at Saint Kirill Belozersk Monastery (Vologda Oblast) was taken in 1993 by Dr. William Brumfield, American photographer and historian of Russian architecture, as part of the "Meeting of Frontiers" project at the Library of Congress. Formally dedicated to the Dormition of the Virgin, the monastery was founded in 1397 by Kirill (1337-1427), a Muscovite monk canonized in 1547. The monastery soon acquired significance as a major religious center with connections to the Muscovite court and as a fortress on ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
St. Cyril (Kirill)-Belozersk Monastery, Church of the Transfiguration over the Water Gate (1595), Northeast View, Kirillov, Russia
This northeast view of the Church of the Transfiguration over the Water Gate at Saint Kirill Belozersk Monastery (Vologda Oblast) was taken in 1991 by Dr. William Brumfield, American photographer and historian of Russian architecture, as part of the "Meeting of Frontiers" project at the Library of Congress. Formally dedicated to the Dormition of the Virgin, the monastery was founded in 1397 on the north shore of Lake Siverskoe by Kirill (1337-1427), a Muscovite monk canonized in 1547. The monastery soon acquired significance as a major religious center with connections ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
St. Cyril (Kirill)-Belozersk Monastery, Ferapontov (Moscow) Tower (1660s), Kirillov, Russia
This south view of the Ferapontov (Moscow) Tower of Saint Kirill Belozersk Monastery (Vologda Oblast) was taken in 1993 by Dr. William Brumfield, American photographer and historian of Russian architecture, as part of the "Meeting of Frontiers" project at the Library of Congress. Formally dedicated to the Dormition of the Virgin, the monastery was founded in 1397 by Kirill (1337-1427), a Muscovite monk canonized in 1547. The monastery rapidly acquired dual significance as a religious center with connections to the Muscovite court and as a fortress on Muscovy's northern ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
St. Cyril (Kirill)-Belozersk Monastery, Southeast Wall with Svitochnaia Tower (1660s), Kirillov, Russia
This east view of the Svitochnaia Tower at Saint Kirill Belozersk Monastery (Vologda Oblast) was taken in 1998 by Dr. William Brumfield, American photographer and historian of Russian architecture, as part of the "Meeting of Frontiers" project at the Library of Congress. Formally dedicated to the Dormition of the Virgin, the monastery was founded in 1397 on the north shore of Lake Siverskoe by Kirill (1337-1427), a monk of noble birth from Moscow who was canonized in 1547. The monastery served both as a religious center and as a fortress ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
St. Cyril (Kirill)-Belozersk Monastery, Church of Archangel Gabriel (1531-34), with Bell Tower (1761), Southeast View, Kirillov, Russia
This southeast view of the Church of Archangel Gabriel and the bell tower at Saint Kirill Belozersk Monastery (Vologda Oblast) was taken in 1998 by Dr. William Brumfield, American photographer and historian of Russian architecture, as part of the "Meeting of Frontiers" project at the Library of Congress. Formally dedicated to the Dormition of the Virgin, the monastery was founded in 1397 on the north shore of Lake Siverskoe by Kirill (1337-1427), a monk of noble birth from Moscow who was canonized in 1547. The monastery served as a religious ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Savior-Prilutskii Monastery, Southeast Panorama, with Vologda River, Vologda, Russia
This southeast view of the Savior-Prilutskii Monastery on the outskirts of Vologda was taken in 1998 by Dr. William Brumfield, American photographer and historian of Russian architecture, as part of the "Meeting of Frontiers" project at the Library of Congress. Before the founding of Saint Petersburg in 1703, Russia depended on a northern route through the White Sea for trade with western Europe. One of the important centers on this route was Vologda, founded in the 12th century. Vologda’s significance was reaffirmed with the establishment in 1371 of the ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Savior-Prilutskii Monastery, South Panorama, Winter, Vologda, Russia
This south view of the Savior-Prilutskii Monastery on the outskirts of Vologda was taken in 2000 by Dr. William Brumfield, American photographer and historian of Russian architecture, as part of the "Meeting of Frontiers" project at the Library of Congress. Before the founding of Saint Petersburg in 1703, Russia depended on a northern route through the White Sea for trade with western Europe. One of the important centers on this route was Vologda, founded in the 12th century. Vologda’s significance was reaffirmed with the establishment in 1371 of the ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Old Cross in the Assumption Monastery for Women. Staraia Ladoga, Russian Empire
At the beginning of the 20th century, the Russian photographer Sergei Mikhailovich Prokudin-Gorskii (1863–1944) used a special color photography process to create a visual record of the Russian Empire. Some of Prokudin-Gorskii’s photographs date from about 1905, but the bulk of his work is from between 1909 and 1915, when, with the support of Tsar Nicholas II and the Ministry of Transportation, he undertook extended trips through many different parts of the empire.
Contributed by Library of Congress
Corner Tower of the Trinity Cathedral in the Solovetskii Monastery. Solovetski Islands
At the beginning of the 20th century, the Russian photographer Sergei Mikhailovich Prokudin-Gorskii (1863–1944) used a special color photography process to create a visual record of the Russian Empire. Some of Prokudin-Gorskii’s photographs date from about 1905, but the bulk of his work is from between 1909 and 1915, when, with the support of Tsar Nicholas II and the Ministry of Transportation, he undertook extended trips through many different parts of the empire.
Contributed by Library of Congress
Catholic Monastery, Italy
At the beginning of the 20th century, the Russian photographer Sergei Mikhailovich Prokudin-Gorskii (1863–1944) used a special color photography process to create a visual record of the Russian Empire. Some of Prokudin-Gorskii’s photographs date from about 1905, but the bulk of his work is from between 1909 and 1915, when, with the support of Tsar Nicholas II and the Ministry of Transportation, he undertook extended trips through many different parts of the empire.
Contributed by Library of Congress
General View of Goritskii Monastery. Russian Empire
At the beginning of the 20th century, the Russian photographer Sergei Mikhailovich Prokudin-Gorskii (1863–1944) used a special color photography process to create a visual record of the Russian Empire. Some of Prokudin-Gorskii’s photographs date from about 1905, but the bulk of his work is from between 1909 and 1915, when, with the support of Tsar Nicholas II and the Ministry of Transportation, he undertook extended trips through many different parts of the empire.
Contributed by Library of Congress
Goritskii Monastery from Maurova Hill. Russian Empire
At the beginning of the 20th century, the Russian photographer Sergei Mikhailovich Prokudin-Gorskii (1863–1944) used a special color photography process to create a visual record of the Russian Empire. Some of Prokudin-Gorskii’s photographs date from about 1905, but the bulk of his work is from between 1909 and 1915, when, with the support of Tsar Nicholas II and the Ministry of Transportation, he undertook extended trips through many different parts of the empire.
Contributed by Library of Congress
Kirillo-Belozerskii Monastery. Russian Empire
At the beginning of the 20th century, the Russian photographer Sergei Mikhailovich Prokudin-Gorskii (1863–1944) used a special color photography process to create a visual record of the Russian Empire. Some of Prokudin-Gorskii’s photographs date from about 1905, but the bulk of his work is from between 1909 and 1915, when, with the support of Tsar Nicholas II and the Ministry of Transportation, he undertook extended trips through many different parts of the empire.
Contributed by Library of Congress
Holy Gates from the Inner Side of the Kirillo-Belozerskii Monastery, Russian Empire
A major component of the Volga-Baltic Waterway (formerly called the Mariinsk Canal System), linking Saint Petersburg with the Volga River basin, is the Sheksna River, which drains the southeastern part of White Lake (Beloe ozero). One of the most important settlements near the Sheksna is Kirillov, founded in 1397 by the monk Kirill (Cyril) as part of his Dormition Monastery, subsequently named the Kirillo-Belozersky Monastery. Seen in this 1909 photograph is the south facade of the Holy Gates, built in 1523 as the north entrance to the main monastery compound ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Holy Gates of the Kirillo-Belozerskii Monastery, Russian Empire
A major component of the Volga-Baltic Waterway (formerly called the Mariinsk Canal System), linking Saint Petersburg with the Volga River basin, is the Sheksna River, which drains the southeastern part of White Lake (Beloe ozero). One of the most important settlements near the Sheksna is Kirillov, founded in 1397 by the monk Kirill (Cyril) as part of his Dormition Monastery, subsequently named the Kirillo-Belozersky Monastery. Seen in this 1909 photograph is the north facade of the Holy Gates, built in 1523 at the entrance to the main monastery compound. The ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Entrance to the Grounds of Leushinskii Monastery for Women. Leushino, Russian Empire
A major component of the Volga-Baltic Waterway (formerly called the Mariinsk Canal System), linking Saint Petersburg with the Volga River basin, is the Sheksna River, which drains the southeastern part of White Lake (Beloe ozero). The original length of the Sheksna was 395 kilometers, from White Lake to the Sheksna’s confluence with the Volga at the town of Rybinsk. Resevoirs created in the mid-20th century submerged the land along the river. A notable lost landmark was the John the Baptist Convent at the village of Leushino, located on the ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Residence for the Sisters of the Leushinskii Monastery. Leushino, Russian Empire
A major component of the Volga-Baltic Waterway (formerly called the Mariinsk Canal System), linking Saint Petersburg with the Volga River basin, is the Sheksna River, which drains the southeastern part of White Lake (Beloe ozero). The original length of the Sheksna was 395 kilometers, from White Lake to the Sheksna’s confluence with the Volga at the town of Rybinsk. Resevoirs created in the mid-20th century submerged much of the land along the river. A notable lost landmark was the John the Baptist Convent at the village of Leushino, located ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Residence of the Mother Superior. Leushinskii Monastery, Leushino, Russian Empire
A major component of the Volga-Baltic Waterway (formerly called the Mariinsk Canal System), linking Saint Petersburg with the Volga River basin, is the Sheksna River, which drains the southeastern part of White Lake (Beloe ozero). The original length of the Sheksna was 395 kilometers, from White Lake to the Sheksna’s confluence with the Volga at the town of Rybinsk. Resevoirs created in the mid-20th century submerged much of the land along the river. A notable lost landmark was the John the Baptist Convent at the village of Leushino, located ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
View of the Solovetskii Monastery from the Inn. Solovetski Islands
The Murmansk Railroad was built by the Russian government during World War I to connect Petrograd (Saint Petersburg) to the ice-free port of Romanov-on-Murman (now Murmansk). Construction lasted from 1914 to the spring of 1917 when the line was completed. Near the route was the monumental Transfiguration Monastery, located on Great Solovetskii Island. This photograph, showing the monastery’s west wall, was taken from a large hotel next to the pier at the Harbor of Blessedness. The massive walls of the monastery were constructed primarily of granite boulders, and were ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
View of the Solovetskii Monastery from Land. Solovetski Islands
The Murmansk Railroad was built by the Russian government during World War I to connect Petrograd (Saint Petersburg) to the ice-free port of Romanov-on-Murman (now Murmansk). Construction lasted from 1914 to the spring of 1917 when the line was completed. Near the route was the Transfiguration Monastery, located on Great Solovetskii Island. This view of the monastery’s east wall was taken from the northeast. The massive walls of the monastery were constructed primarily of granite boulders, and were built between 1582 and 1621. In the foreground, with a small ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Solovetskii Monastery from the Lake. Solovetski Islands
The Murmansk Railroad was built by the Russian government during World War I to connect Petrograd (Saint Petersburg) to the ice-free port of Romanov-on-Murman (now Murmansk). Construction lasted from 1914 to the spring of 1917 when the line was completed. Near the route was the Transfiguration Monastery, located on Great Solovetskii Island. This view shows the Saint Nicholas Tower and gate, located at the northeast corner of the monastery. The massive walls of the monastery were constructed primarily of granite boulders, and were built between 1582 and 1621, with the ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Trinity Cathedral and the Electric Station. A Side View. Solovetskii Monastery. Solovetski Islands
The Murmansk Railroad was built by the Russian government during World War I to connect Petrograd (Saint Petersburg) to the ice-free port of Romanov-on-Murman (now Murmansk). Construction lasted from 1914 to the spring of 1917 when the line was completed. Near the route was the Transfiguration Monastery, located on Great Solovetskii Island. Seen here is the brick building of the electric station for the monastery, completed in 1912 and equipped by the Saint Petersburg affiliate of the Siemens Company. Behind the electric station is the south wall of the monastery ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Ekaterinburg. Entrance into the Tikhvinskii Monastery for Women
Founded in the early 18th century, Ekaterinburg was home to several monastic institutions, including the New Tikhvin Convent, formally established in 1809. By the beginning of the 20th century it was one of the largest convents in Russia, with its capacious Cathedral of Saint Alexander Nevsky (1838-52; not extant). This view shows three churches along the east wall:  the Church of Saint Feodosii (far left); the Church of the Presentation, located over the convent’s east gate; and the Church of the Icon of the Mother of God “Joy to ...
Contributed by Library of Congress