10 results in English
Samarkand Bazaar and Its Types of Vendors. Doctor Selling Medicine
This photograph is from the ethnographical part of Turkestan Album, a comprehensive visual survey of Central Asia undertaken after imperial Russia assumed control of the region in the 1860s. Commissioned by General Konstantin Petrovich von Kaufman (1818–82), the first governor-general of Russian Turkestan, the album is in four parts spanning six volumes: “Archaeological Part” (two volumes); “Ethnographic Part” (two volumes); “Trades Part” (one volume); and “Historical Part” (one volume). The principal compiler was Russian Orientalist Aleksandr L. Kun, who was assisted by Nikolai V. Bogaevskii. The album contains some ...
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The New Chemical Medicine Invented by Paracelsus
Philippus Aureolus Theophrastus Bombastus von Hohenheim, known as Paracelsus (died September 24, 1541), was a Swiss-German Renaissance-era alchemist, physician, and medical reformer. Al-Ṭibb al-jadīd al-kīmiyāʼī alladhī ikhtaraʻahu Barākalsūs (The new chemical medicine invented by Paracelsus) is an anthology of alchemical works from Europe. The first part consists of an Arabic translation of Paracelsus including an introduction, and four chapters (each divided further into sections). The introduction is an overview by Hermes Trismegistus, called “the Egyptian,” of the invention of alchemy, its subsequent transfer to the Hellenistic and Islamic worlds ...
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Recovery from Diseases and Remedy for Pains
The full name of the author of Shifāʼ al-asqām wa dawāʼ al-ālām (Recovery from diseases and remedy for pains) is Khidr ibn ʻAli ibn Marwan ibnʿAli ibn Husam al-Din, originally called al-Qunawi, also known as Hajji Pasha al-Aidini and al-Misri, thus identifying his provenance as Konya, Turkey. In his introduction to Shifāʼ al-asqām wa dawāʼ al-ālām, the author describes his extended stay in Egypt where he practiced as a physician at the celebrated Maristan al-Mansuri as well as at other hospitals, thus validating the appellation al-Misri (the Egyptian). He also ...
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Capsula Eburnea: Epistle from Hippocrates's Tomb
This short work consists of a collection of 25 maxims attributed to Hippocrates (circa 460−circa 377 BC). The maxims are exclusively concerned with the prognosis of patients who are terminally ill. The standard form for the maxim consists of a symptom, followed by the time (in days) to the patient's death, followed by a secondary symptom affirming the case. The 14th maxim, for instance, reads as follows: “If there appears behind the left ear a black pustule, then the patient will die in 24 days as counted from ...
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The New Chemical Medicine Invented by Paracelsus
Philippus Aureolus Theophrastus Bombastus von Hohenheim, known as Paracelsus (died September 24, 1541), was a Swiss-German Renaissance-era alchemist, physician, and medical reformer. Al-Ṭibb al-jadīd al-kīmiyāʼī alladhī ikhtaraʻahu Barākalsūs (The new chemical medicine invented by Paracelsus) is an anthology of alchemical works from Europe. The first part consists of an Arabic translation of Paracelsus including an introduction, and four chapters (each divided further into sections). The introduction is an overview by Hermes Trismegistus, called “the Egyptian,” of the invention of alchemy, its subsequent transfer to the Hellenistic and Islamic worlds ...
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The Book of Instant Recovery
Kitāb burʼ al-sāʻa (The book of instant recovery) is a short medical tract by the famous Islamic scientist and physician Abu Bakr Muhammad ibn Zakariya Razi (died circa 925). The work consists of 24 short sections, which list the remedies for common afflictions. The work includes sections on al-udāʻ (headaches), wajʻ al-asnān (toothache), and al-iʻyā wa al-taʻab (exhaustion). The colophon lists the scribe’s name as Ghulam Muhammad Pursururi and the completion date for the manuscript as Dhu Qa’da 17, 1173 AH (July 1, 1760). Based on ...
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The Book of the New Chemical Medicine
This important text presents a detailed exposition of the harmony-based non-Galenic medicinal system of Paracelsus, i.e., Phillip von Hohenheim (1493-1541), the famous Renaissance author who advocated a new approach to the use of chemicals and minerals in medicine. The treatise, comprising more than 100 folio sheets, is divided into an introduction and several chapters. In the introduction, the author derives the word kīmīyā from the Greek χημεία. He attributes the foundation of the discipline to Hermes, but credits Paracelsus with shifting the discipline toward the art of medicine and ...
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Doctors. Samarkand
Shown here are two doctors wearing skullcaps and padded robes. Arrayed on the carpet between them are medicinal preparations in stoppered vials, as well as an assortment of powders. The steps lead to the shadowy space of a cavernous entrance arch to a sacred building—perhaps the Gur Emir, mausoleum of the Timurids. The lower walls are covered with carved stone tablets, while fragments of ceramic tiles are dimly visible above. The figure in the background appears to be a mullah in white turban and patterned robe. The image is ...
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The Book of the Interpreter
This 16th-century manuscript is an old copy of the classified Syriac–Garshuni glossary by  Elias of Nisibis (975–1046). Elias was an eastern Syriac scholar and monk, who was later a bishop and from 1008–46 metropolitan of Nisibis in northern Mesopotamia (present-day Nusaybin in southeastern Turkey). He was an important figure in Syriac and Christian Arabic literature and an early grammarian. In addition to this glossary, his literary output included a bilingual (Syriac–Arabic) chronicle, liturgical poetry, and letters. This work is prefaced by Eliya's address to the ...
John Horn, Drugs and Chemical Store. Northeast Corner of Third and Brown Streets, Philadelphia
This advertising print from 1846 shows the drugs and chemical store of John Horn, located at 801 North Third Street in Philadelphia, where he operated from 1829 to 1871. A large banner above the main entrances to the building reads "J. Horn Drugs & Chemical Store. City & county physicians can always be supplied with medicines & chemicals of the purest kind prepared with the greatest care from the latest French, English, German, & American journals." A customer is seen entering the establishment, while another looks at the wares displayed in the window. A ...