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The People of Taiwan Parading to a Ritual Sacrifice (for Generals Fan and Xie)
The annual ritual sacrifices for General Fan and Xie at the temple to the city gods in Taipei were especially important to the people of Taiwan during the period of Japanese occupation, which lasted from 1895 to 1945. Extra trains in and out of Taipei were scheduled to accommodate the crowds that came to this event from all over Taiwan.
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National Central Library
Raising Ducks in Taipei Province
Traditionally, raising ducks has been an important enterprise in Taiwan, especially in the northern region. Wherever there is water, families have raised ducks for food.
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National Central Library
The Magnificent Longshan Temple in Taipei
The Longshan Temple is the most famous ancient temple in Taipei. Built in 1738 by settlers from the Chinese mainland who founded a trading post at the site 15 years previously, the temple was where local residents worshipped the Guanyin Bodhisattva and looked to it for protection and the resolution of disputes. In the Sino-French War of 1884-85, the temple became a rallying point for the successful defense of Taiwan against French troops. Earthquakes, storms, and a major termite assault obliged the community to rebuild the temple at various times ...
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National Central Library
View of the Office of the Governor-General of Taiwan
Under Japanese rule between 1895 and 1945, the chief authority in Taiwan was the governor-general, an official appointed by, and sent from, Tokyo. The governor-general wielded supreme executive, legislative, and judicial power. This 1920s photograph shows the office of the governor general, which included bureaus for military and home affairs. Construction of this building, by workers imported from Japan, began in 1912 and was completed in 1919.
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The Public Baths: Which Take Pride in Their Blend of Japanese and Foreign Architecture (Caoshan [J. Sōzan] Hot Springs, Taiwan)
The Taipei Prefecture public baths were built in the late 1920s to commemorate the enthronement of the Showa emperor in Japan, at a site where natural hot springs already were in use. The facilities were considered to be the best in Taiwan. Japanese forces invaded and occupied Taiwan in the Sino-Japanese War of 1895, a conflict between the Chinese and Japanese empires mainly over control of Korea. At the conclusion of the war, China ceded Taiwan to Japan. The occupation lasted until 1945 and the end of World War II.
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National Central Library