38 results
Kuklin House (1790s; after 1817), Governor's Mansion, Study of Nicholas II, who Lived Here with his Family from August 1917 until mid April, 1918, Tobol'sk, Russia
This photograph of the study of Nicholas II at the Governor General's Mansion in Tobol'sk was taken in 1999 by Dr. William Brumfield, American photographer and historian of Russian architecture, as part of the "Meeting of Frontiers" project at the Library of Congress. Tobol'sk was founded in 1587 by the cossack leader Daniel Chulkov near the confluence of the Tobol' and Irtysh rivers. Thereafter, Tobol'sk became the main administrative center of Siberia until the mid-19th century. A factor in its decline was the routing of the ...
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Private Drawing Room, I, Kasr-el-Said, Tunisia
This photochrome print is part of “Views of Architecture and People in Tunisia” from the catalog of the Detroit Photographic Company. It shows a private drawing room in the Kassar-Said Palace in Tunis. Baedeker’s The Mediterranean: Handbook for Travelers (1911) described the palace as “a château of the bey” to which admittance by tourists was not allowed. “Here, in 1881, was concluded the Bardo Treaty, which ended the independence of Tunisia.” Tunisia came under the control of the Ottoman Empire in 1574. Bey was originally the title of the ...
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Bedchamber of the Late Bey of Tunis, Kasr-el-Said, Tunisia
This photochrome print, from circa 1899, is part of “Views of Architecture and People in Tunisia” from the catalog of the Detroit Photographic Company. It shows the chamber of the bey of Tunis in the Kassar-Said Palace in Tunis. Baedeker’s The Mediterranean: Handbook for Travelers (1911) described the palace as “a château of the bey” to which admittance by tourists was not allowed. Muhammad III as-Sadiq (1813–82) ruled Tunisia from September 1859 until his death in October 1882. He was succeeded by Ali Muddat ibn al-Husayn (1817–1902 ...
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Bardo, Tribunal Chamber, Tunis, Tunisia
This photochrome print of the tribunal chamber in the Bardo Palace in Tunis is part of “Views of Architecture and People in Tunisia” from the catalog of the Detroit Photographic Company. Baedeker’s The Mediterranean: Handbook for Travellers (1911) informed its readers that the Bardo, located in the fertile plain to the west of Tunis, was a 13th- century palace that was “the former winter-residence of the beys.” It once “formed a little town by itself” and housed “a treasury, a mosque, baths, barracks, and a prison.” This photo shows ...
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Vitebsk. Iconostasis in the Assumption Cathedral
At the beginning of the 20th century, the Russian photographer Sergei Mikhailovich Prokudin-Gorskii (1863–1944) used a special color photography process to create a visual record of the Russian Empire. Some of Prokudin-Gorskii’s photographs date from about 1905, but the bulk of his work is from between 1909 and 1915, when, with the support of Tsar Nicholas II and the Ministry of Transportation, he undertook extended trips through many different parts of the empire.
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Igoshev House, from Village of Gribany (Mid-19th Century), Interior, Main Room, Khokhlovka, Russia
This interior view of a log house (izba) at the V.I. Igoshev farmstead from the village of Gribany (Uinskoe District, Perm' Region) was taken in 1999 by Dr. William Brumfield, American photographer and historian of Russian architecture, as part of the "Meeting of Frontiers" project at the Library of Congress. Situated on the Teles River (a southern sub-tributary of the Kama River), Gribany was too small to have a church, but the fertile river lands provided a reasonably secure existence for peasant farmers and craftsmen in the mid-19th century ...
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Weighing Section. Chakva Tea Factory
At the beginning of the 20th century, the Russian photographer Sergei Mikhailovich Prokudin-Gorskii (1863–1944) used a special color photography process to create a visual record of the Russian Empire. Some of Prokudin-Gorskii’s photographs date from about 1905, but the bulk of his work is from between 1909 and 1915, when, with the support of Tsar Nicholas II and the Ministry of Transportation, he undertook extended trips through many different parts of the empire.
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Skeleton of Large-Horned Stag in the Museum of the City of Ekaterinburg
At the beginning of the 20th century, the Russian photographer Sergei Mikhailovich Prokudin-Gorskii (1863–1944) used a special color photography process to create a visual record of the Russian Empire. Some of Prokudin-Gorskii’s photographs date from about 1905, but the bulk of his work is from between 1909 and 1915, when, with the support of Tsar Nicholas II and the Ministry of Transportation, he undertook extended trips through many different parts of the empire.
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Molding Shop at the Kasli Plant
At the beginning of the 20th century, the Russian photographer Sergei Mikhailovich Prokudin-Gorskii (1863–1944) used a special color photography process to create a visual record of the Russian Empire. Some of Prokudin-Gorskii’s photographs date from about 1905, but the bulk of his work is from between 1909 and 1915, when, with the support of Tsar Nicholas II and the Ministry of Transportation, he undertook extended trips through many different parts of the empire.
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Molding of an Artistic Casting. Kasli Iron Works
At the beginning of the 20th century, the Russian photographer Sergei Mikhailovich Prokudin-Gorskii (1863–1944) used a special color photography process to create a visual record of the Russian Empire. Some of Prokudin-Gorskii’s photographs date from about 1905, but the bulk of his work is from between 1909 and 1915, when, with the support of Tsar Nicholas II and the Ministry of Transportation, he undertook extended trips through many different parts of the empire.
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Inside the Conservatory. Yellow Plums. Blizhniaia Dacha, Kyshtym
At the beginning of the 20th century, the Russian photographer Sergei Mikhailovich Prokudin-Gorskii (1863–1944) used a special color photography process to create a visual record of the Russian Empire. Some of Prokudin-Gorskii’s photographs date from about 1905, but the bulk of his work is from between 1909 and 1915, when, with the support of Tsar Nicholas II and the Ministry of Transportation, he undertook extended trips through many different parts of the empire.
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Tomb of Boyar Mikhail Nikitich Romanov in the Winter Church in the Village of Nyrob. Church of Saint Nicholas the Wonder Worker
At the beginning of the 20th century, the Russian photographer Sergei Mikhailovich Prokudin-Gorskii (1863–1944) used a special color photography process to create a visual record of the Russian Empire. Some of Prokudin-Gorskii’s photographs date from about 1905, but the bulk of his work is from between 1909 and 1915, when, with the support of Tsar Nicholas II and the Ministry of Transportation, he undertook extended trips through many different parts of the empire.
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Drying Ovens for Tea. Tea Factory in Chakva
At the beginning of the 20th century, the Russian photographer Sergei Mikhailovich Prokudin-Gorskii (1863–1944) used a special color photography process to create a visual record of the Russian Empire. Some of Prokudin-Gorskii’s photographs date from about 1905, but the bulk of his work is from between 1909 and 1915, when, with the support of Tsar Nicholas II and the Ministry of Transportation, he undertook extended trips through many different parts of the empire.
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Steam Room for Treatment of Bamboo. Chakva
At the beginning of the 20th century, the Russian photographer Sergei Mikhailovich Prokudin-Gorskii (1863–1944) used a special color photography process to create a visual record of the Russian Empire. Some of Prokudin-Gorskii’s photographs date from about 1905, but the bulk of his work is from between 1909 and 1915, when, with the support of Tsar Nicholas II and the Ministry of Transportation, he undertook extended trips through many different parts of the empire.
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Packaging Department. Borzhom
At the beginning of the 20th century, the Russian photographer Sergei Mikhailovich Prokudin-Gorskii (1863–1944) used a special color photography process to create a visual record of the Russian Empire. Some of Prokudin-Gorskii’s photographs date from about 1905, but the bulk of his work is from between 1909 and 1915, when, with the support of Tsar Nicholas II and the Ministry of Transportation, he undertook extended trips through many different parts of the empire.
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Mosque in Vladikavkaz
At the beginning of the 20th century, the Russian photographer Sergei Mikhailovich Prokudin-Gorskii (1863–1944) used a special color photography process to create a visual record of the Russian Empire. Some of Prokudin-Gorskii’s photographs date from about 1905, but the bulk of his work is from between 1909 and 1915, when, with the support of Tsar Nicholas II and the Ministry of Transportation, he undertook extended trips through many different parts of the empire.
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In the Borodino Museum. Borodino
At the beginning of the 20th century, the Russian photographer Sergei Mikhailovich Prokudin-Gorskii (1863–1944) used a special color photography process to create a visual record of the Russian Empire. Some of Prokudin-Gorskii’s photographs date from about 1905, but the bulk of his work is from between 1909 and 1915, when, with the support of Tsar Nicholas II and the Ministry of Transportation, he undertook extended trips through many different parts of the empire.
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Pulpit in Nikolaevskii Cathedral, Dating Back to the Time When It Was a Polish Roman Catholic Church. Polotsk
At the beginning of the 20th century, the Russian photographer Sergei Mikhailovich Prokudin-Gorskii (1863–1944) used a special color photography process to create a visual record of the Russian Empire. Some of Prokudin-Gorskii’s photographs date from about 1905, but the bulk of his work is from between 1909 and 1915, when, with the support of Tsar Nicholas II and the Ministry of Transportation, he undertook extended trips through many different parts of the empire.
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Example of Mosaics on the Walls in the Home of a Wealthy Sart. On the Outskirts of Samarkand
According to the caption, this decorated interior is in a suburban house belonging to a wealthy Sart. In the late 19th century the term “Sart” referred not only to town dwellers, but also to the inhabitants of this area from before the coming of Uzbek tribes in the 16th century. The lavish decorative work displays floral bouquets, as well as botanical motifs and astral patterns formed by a complex system of intersecting lines. The owner of such a richly decorated house presumably belonged to a member of the local elite ...
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In the Country Palace of the Bukhara Emir. Bukhara
Between 1785 and 1920, eight emirs of the Manghit dynasty ruled Buhkara (in present-day Uzbekistan). After the Russian occupation of Samarkand (1868), the Emirate of Bukhara became a Russian protectorate. The last emir of Bukhara was Said Mir Mohammed Alim Khan. Shown here is the throne room of the emir’s suburban residence at Shir-Budun near Bukhara. The design shows the often fanciful use of traditional decorative motifs within a European interior, including the bentwood chairs along the wall. The ceiling cornice displays a decorative application of suspended vaulting elements ...
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Detail inside the Baian-Kuli-Khan Tomb. Bukhara
This photograph shows a corner vault beneath the dome of the 16th-century mausoleum of the Chagatai Khan Bayan Qulï in the Faisakhan area on the outskirts of Bukhara. In 1348 Bayan Qulï was made titular ruler of Bukhara by Emir Qazaghan, who had seized power in the area in 1346. In 1358 the emir was assassinated. Power passed to his son Abdullah, who then had the Bayan Qulï executed. Abdullah was himself killed the same year, and Bayan Qulï was buried next to the mausoleum of his revered teacher, Sheikh ...
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