78 results in English
Album of Religious Artifacts from the Church Archaeological Museum of Kiev Theological Academy
This book, the first in a series of albums dedicated to the Church Archaeological Museum of Kiev Theological Academy, is about the collection of icons from Mount Sinai and Mount Athos assembled by Bishop Porfiry Uspensky (1804–85). Bishop Porfiry was born in Russia, studied at the Saint Petersburg Theological Academy, and was ordained as a priest in 1829. In 1842 he was sent by the synod of the Russian Orthodox Church to Jerusalem to strengthen relations with the Orthodox Christians of Syria and Palestine. In 1845–46 he made ...
Art of Ancient Rus’-Ukraine
This book is a short history of the art of Ancient Rus’, the medieval polity centered on Kiev, which flourished from the 9th to the 13th centuries, and which formed the basis for much of later Russian and Ukrainian culture. Topics covered include the influences of the Varangians and of Eastern Orthodoxy, the importance of Christianity, wooden architecture, churches and monasteries in Kiev, art and architecture in the historic city of Chernigov, and the arts of enamel and icon painting. Particular attention is paid to Saint Sophia Cathedral in Kiev ...
Album Number 14: Drawings and Sketches by Students of the Kiev-Pechersk Lavra Monastery Workshop
The collection of kuzhbushki (a corrupt form of the German, Kunstbuch, meaning “book of art”) held by the V.I. Vernadsky National Library of Ukraine contains albums of drawings by teachers and students at the Kiev-Pechersk Lavra Monastery icon-painting workshop. Also included in the collection are albums containing examples of West European engravings from the 16th–18th centuries. The Kiev-Pechersk Lavra Monastery workshop was one of the oldest art schools in Eastern Europe. Among the drawings in this album are portraits of prominent church and political figures, sketches on religious ...
Church of the Resurrection, Interior, with Icon Screen, Matigory, Russia
This view of the icon screen of the Church of the Resurrection in the village of Verkhnie Matigory (Arkhangel'sk Oblast) was taken in 1999 by Dr. William Brumfield, American photographer and historian of Russian architecture, as part of the "Meeting of Frontiers" project at the Library of Congress. The Church of the Resurrection was built in 1686-94. Its five-tiered 18th-century icon screen (iconostasis) is one of the best preserved in the Russian north and contains a number of ancient icons. Although part of the second tier (Holy Festivals) is ...
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Church of the Epiphany (1787), Interior, View East with Icon Screen, Oshevensk, Russia
This interior east view of the log Church of the Epiphany at Oshevenskoe (Kargopol' District, Arkhangel'sk Oblast) was taken in 1998 by Dr. William Brumfield, American photographer and historian of Russian architecture, as part of the "Meeting of Frontiers" project at the Library of Congress. Oshevenskoe, located along the right bank of the Chur'iuga River, developed near the Dormition Monastery, which was founded by the monk Alexander Osheven in 1453. This large village consisted of three hamlets, each with its own name. The Church of the Epiphany, built ...
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Church of the Epiphany (1787), Interior, View East with Nebo ("Sky," or Painted Ceiling), Oshevensk, Russia
This interior view of the log Church of the Epiphany at Oshevenskoe (Kargopol' District, Arkhangel'sk Oblast) was taken in 1998 by Dr. William Brumfield, American photographer and historian of Russian architecture, as part of the "Meeting of Frontiers" project at the Library of Congress. Oshevenskoe extends along the right bank of the Chur'iuga River near the Dormition Monastery, founded by the monk Alexander Osheven in 1453. The interior of the Church of the Epiphany, built in 1787, has a remarkable four-tiered iconostasis and painted ceiling. This view includes ...
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Church of the Intercession (1743, 1761), Interior, View East with Upper Tier of Icon Screen and Nebo ("Sky," or Painted Ceiling), Liadiny, Russia
This interior view of the wooden Church of the Intercession of the Mother of God at the village of Liadiny (Kargopol’ District, Arkhangel'sk Oblast) was taken in 1998 by Dr. William Brumfield, American photographer and historian of Russian architecture, as part of the "Meeting of Frontiers" project at the Library of Congress. The main space of the Church of the Intercession of the Mother of God, built around 1762, contains a partially preserved, four-tiered iconostasis and a superb painted panel ceiling known as a nebo (sky). This view includes ...
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Cathedral of the Annuciation (1560-84), Southwest Panorama with Vychegda River, Sol'vychegodsk, Russia
This southwest view of the Cathedral of the Annunciation at Sol'vychegodsk (Arkhangel'sk Oblast) was taken in 1996 by Dr. William Brumfield, American photographer and historian of Russian architecture, as part of the "Meeting of Frontiers" project at the Library of Congress. Located near the confluence of the Vychegda and Northern Dvina rivers, Sol’vychegodsk (Salt of the Vychegda) is in an area of many salt springs. In the 16th century it became the center of vast trading operations owned by the Stroganovs, whose wealth was based on salt ...
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Church of the Presentation of the Virgin (1688-93), Interior, View East toward Icon Screen, Sol'vychegodsk, Russia
This interior view of the Cathedral of the Presentation of the Virgin in Sol'vychegodsk (Arkhangel'sk Oblast) was taken in 1996 by Dr. William Brumfield, American photographer and historian of Russian architecture, as part of the "Meeting of Frontiers" project at the Library of Congress. This spectacular church was built for the Presentation Monastery, founded in 1565 by the Stroganov family as part of their trading compound at Sol’vychegodsk. Construction began in 1688 with the support of Grigorii Stroganov, soon to become prominent in the reign of Peter ...
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Cathedral of the Annunciation (1560-84), Interior, View East toward Icon Screen (Late 17th Century), Sol'vychegodsk, Russia
This interior view of the Cathedral of the Annunciation at Sol'vychegodsk (Arkhangel'sk Oblast) was taken in 1999 by Dr. William Brumfield, American photographer and historian of Russian architecture, as part of the "Meeting of Frontiers" project at the Library of Congress. Located near the confluence of the Vychegda and Northern Dvina rivers, Sol’vychegodsk (Salt of the Vychegda) became, in the 16th century, the center of vast trading operations owned by the Stroganovs, whose wealth was based on salt. The patriarch of the dynasty, Anika (Ioannikii) Stroganov (1497-1570 ...
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Cathedral of St. Prokopii of Ustiug, Interior, Upper Tiers of Icon Screen, Velikii Ustiug, Russia
This interior view, east toward the iconostasis, of the Cathedral of Saint Prokopii of Ustiug at Velikii Ustiug (Vologda Oblast) was taken in 1999 by Dr. William Brumfield, American photographer and historian of Russian architecture, as part of the "Meeting of Frontiers" project at the Library of Congress. Saint Prokopii was a 13th-century German merchant who converted to Orthodoxy in Novgorod in the 1240s and eventually moved to remote Ustiug, where he undertook a 30-year period of self-abnegation as a iurodivyi (Fool in Christ). Accounts of miracles accumulated after his ...
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Church of the Ascension (1648-49, 1670s, 1742), Interior, East Wall and Icon Screen, Velikii Ustiug, Russia
This view of the iconostasis in the Church of the Ascension in Velikii Ustiug (Vologda Oblast) was taken in 1998 by Dr. William Brumfield, American photographer and historian of Russian architecture, as part of the "Meeting of Frontiers" project at the Library of Congress. Settled by Russians as early as the 12th century, Velikii Ustiug became an important center during the medieval period not only for trade, but also for missionary activity by the Orthodox Church. Of the town's many churches, the most floridly decorated is the Church of ...
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Archangel Michael Monastery, Archangel Cathedral (1653-56), Interior, East View, with Icon Screen (Late 18th Century), Velikii Ustiug, Russia
This interior view of the main church (sobor) of the Archangel Michael Monastery in Velikii Ustiug (Vologda Oblast) was taken in 1996 by Dr. William Brumfield, American photographer and historian of Russian architecture, as part of the "Meeting of Frontiers" project at the Library of Congress. Medieval chronicles state that the Archangel Michael Monastery, one of the oldest in the Russian north, was founded by the venerable monk Kiprian in 1212. In 1653-56 the monastery's cathedral, dedicated to the Archangel Michael, was rebuilt in brick and endowed by the ...
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Archangel Michael Monastery, Archangel Cathedral (1653-56), Interior, with Icon Screen, Velikii Ustiug, Russia
This view of the iconostasis of the main church (sobor) of the Archangel Michael Monastery in Velikii Ustiug (Vologda Oblast) was taken in 1996 by Dr. William Brumfield, American photographer and historian of Russian architecture, as part of the "Meeting of Frontiers" project at the Library of Congress. Medieval chronicles state that the Archangel Michael Monastery, one of the oldest in the Russian north, was founded by the venerable monk Kiprian in 1212. In 1653-56 the monastery's cathedral, dedicated to the Archangel Michael, was rebuilt in brick and endowed ...
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Trinity-Gleden Monastery, Church of the Trinity, Interior, View East with Icon Screen, Velikii Ustiug, Russia
This interior view of the Church (sobor) of the Trinity of the Trinity-Gleden Monastery (at Morozovitsa, near Velikii Ustiug, Vologda Oblast) was taken in 1998 by Dr. William Brumfield, American photographer and historian of Russian architecture, as part of the "Meeting of Frontiers" project at the Library of Congress. Settled by Russians as early as the 12th century, Velikii Ustiug rapidly became a center of trade and missionary activity. The wealth of the town's merchants in the 18th century supported donations to churches, including the Trinity-Gleden Monastery, located south ...
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St. Cyril (Kirill)-Belozersk Monastery, Church of the Transfiguration over the Water Gate (1595), Interior, View East with Icon Screen, Kirillov, Russia
This interior view of the Church of the Transfiguration over the Water Gate at Saint Kirill Belozersk Monastery (Vologda Oblast) was taken in 1999 by Dr. William Brumfield, American photographer and historian of Russian architecture, as part of the "Meeting of Frontiers" project at the Library of Congress. Formally dedicated to the Dormition of the Virgin, the monastery was founded in 1397 on the north shore of Lake Siverskoe by Kirill (1337-1427), a Muscovite monk canonized in 1547. The monastery soon acquired significance as a major religious center with connections ...
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Cathedral of St. Sophia (1568-70), Interior, East View, Vologda, Russia
This interior view of the Cathedral of Saint Sophia in Vologda was taken in 1996 by Dr. William Brumfield, American photographer and historian of Russian architecture, as part of the "Meeting of Frontiers" project at the Library of Congress. Before the founding of Saint Petersburg in 1703, Russia depended on a northern route through the White Sea for trade with western Europe. One of the most important centers on this route was Vologda, founded in the 12th century. The significance of Vologda increased during the reign of Ivan IV (the ...
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Church of John the Baptist in Roshchenie (1710-17), Interior, Northwest Corner, with Frescoes, Vologda, Russia
This northwest view of the interior of the Church of the Decapitation of John the Baptist in Roshchen'e (a district in Vologda) was taken in 1999 by Dr. William Brumfield, American photographer and historian of Russian architecture, as part of the "Meeting of Frontiers" project at the Library of Congress. Before the founding of Saint Petersburg in 1703, Russia depended on a northern route through the White Sea for trade with western Europe. One of the most important centers on this route was Vologda, founded in the 12th century ...
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Church of the Intercession (1764), Icon Screen, Kizhi Island, Russia
This interior view of the Church of the Intercession of the Mother of God on Kizhi Island (Karelia) was taken in 1993 by Dr. William Brumfield, American photographer and historian of Russian architecture, as part of the "Meeting of Frontiers" project at the Library of Congress. Located within an archipelago in the southwestern part of Lake Onega, Kizhi Island is one of the most revered sites in the Russian north, with a pogost, or enclosed cemetery, containing a bell tower and two wooden churches, one dedicated to the Transfiguration and ...
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Church of the Intercession (1764), Icon Screen, Kizhi Island, Russia
This interior view of the Church of the Intercession of the Mother of God on Kizhi Island (Karelia) was taken in 1993 by Dr. William Brumfield, American photographer and historian of Russian architecture, as part of the "Meeting of Frontiers" project at the Library of Congress. Located within an archipelago in the southwestern part of Lake Onega, Kizhi Island is one of the most revered sites in the Russian north, with a pogost, or enclosed cemetery, containing two wooden churches, one dedicated to the Transfiguration (1714) and the other to ...
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Polish Victims' Relief Fund. Most Holy Virgin of Częstochowa Help Us
This World War I poster, published in Britain in 1915, shows refugees outside a devastated town, gazing up at an apparition of Our Lady of Częstochowa. The text appeals for donations to help victims of the fighting in Poland. When the war broke out, Poland was part of the Russian Empire. Russia, at war with Germany, invaded the German enclave of East Prussia from Polish territory in August 1914, but after initial successes, was defeated at the August 26–30 Battle of Tannenberg. Germany and its ally Austria-Hungary launched an ...
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Wall Paintings in the Church of Saint George. Staraia Ladoga, Russian Empire
At the beginning of the 20th century, the Russian photographer Sergei Mikhailovich Prokudin-Gorskii (1863–1944) used a special color photography process to create a visual record of the Russian Empire. Some of Prokudin-Gorskii’s photographs date from about 1905, but the bulk of his work is from between 1909 and 1915, when, with the support of Tsar Nicholas II and the Ministry of Transportation, he undertook extended trips through many different parts of the empire.
Contributed by Library of Congress
Wall Paintings in the Church of Saint George. Staraia Ladoga, Russian Empire
At the beginning of the 20th century, the Russian photographer Sergei Mikhailovich Prokudin-Gorskii (1863–1944) used a special color photography process to create a visual record of the Russian Empire. Some of Prokudin-Gorskii’s photographs date from about 1905, but the bulk of his work is from between 1909 and 1915, when, with the support of Tsar Nicholas II and the Ministry of Transportation, he undertook extended trips through many different parts of the empire.
Contributed by Library of Congress
Wall Paintings in the Church of Saint George. Staraia Ladoga, Russian Empire
At the beginning of the 20th century, the Russian photographer Sergei Mikhailovich Prokudin-Gorskii (1863–1944) used a special color photography process to create a visual record of the Russian Empire. Some of Prokudin-Gorskii’s photographs date from about 1905, but the bulk of his work is from between 1909 and 1915, when, with the support of Tsar Nicholas II and the Ministry of Transportation, he undertook extended trips through many different parts of the empire.
Contributed by Library of Congress
Icon of the Last Judgement. Village of Pidma. Russian Empire
At the beginning of the 20th century, the Russian photographer Sergei Mikhailovich Prokudin-Gorskii (1863–1944) used a special color photography process to create a visual record of the Russian Empire. Some of Prokudin-Gorskii’s photographs date from about 1905, but the bulk of his work is from between 1909 and 1915, when, with the support of Tsar Nicholas II and the Ministry of Transportation, he undertook extended trips through many different parts of the empire.
Contributed by Library of Congress
Altar Cross and Icon in the Church of the Transfiguration. Pidma, Russian Empire
At the beginning of the 20th century, the Russian photographer Sergei Mikhailovich Prokudin-Gorskii (1863–1944) used a special color photography process to create a visual record of the Russian Empire. Some of Prokudin-Gorskii’s photographs date from about 1905, but the bulk of his work is from between 1909 and 1915, when, with the support of Tsar Nicholas II and the Ministry of Transportation, he undertook extended trips through many different parts of the empire.
Contributed by Library of Congress
Old Royal Gates in the Church of the Assumption of the Mother of God. Deviatiny. Russian Empire
At the beginning of the 20th century, the Russian photographer Sergei Mikhailovich Prokudin-Gorskii (1863–1944) used a special color photography process to create a visual record of the Russian Empire. Some of Prokudin-Gorskii’s photographs date from about 1905, but the bulk of his work is from between 1909 and 1915, when, with the support of Tsar Nicholas II and the Ministry of Transportation, he undertook extended trips through many different parts of the empire.
Contributed by Library of Congress
Two Icons - Saints Peter and Paul. From the Chapel of Peter the Great in the Village of Petrovskoe. Russian Empire
The Mariinsky Canal System (now known as the Volga-Baltic Waterway) links Saint Petersburg with the Volga River basin. A critical component in the construction of the system was an 18th-century canal linking the Vytegra River (flowing into Lake Onega toward Saint Petersburg) and the Kovzha River (flowing south into White Lake). This photograph shows icons of Saints Peter (right) and Paul from the chapel in the village of Petrovskoe, located on the canal in the Vytegra region (present-day Vologda Oblast). The chapel, presumably built at the turn of the 19th-century ...
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Icon in the Church of the Prophet Elijah. Belozersk, Russian Empire
At the beginning of the 20th century, the Russian photographer Sergei Mikhailovich Prokudin-Gorskii (1863–1944) used a special color photography process to create a visual record of the Russian Empire. Some of Prokudin-Gorskii’s photographs date from about 1905, but the bulk of his work is from between 1909 and 1915, when, with the support of Tsar Nicholas II and the Ministry of Transportation, he undertook extended trips through many different parts of the empire.
Contributed by Library of Congress
Icon in the Church of the Prophet Elijah. Belozersk, Russian Empire
At the beginning of the 20th century, the Russian photographer Sergei Mikhailovich Prokudin-Gorskii (1863–1944) used a special color photography process to create a visual record of the Russian Empire. Some of Prokudin-Gorskii’s photographs date from about 1905, but the bulk of his work is from between 1909 and 1915, when, with the support of Tsar Nicholas II and the Ministry of Transportation, he undertook extended trips through many different parts of the empire.
Contributed by Library of Congress
Two Icons in the Church of the Prophet Elijah. Belozersk, Russian Empire
The Mariinsky Canal System (now known as the Volga-Baltic Waterway) links Saint Petersburg with the Volga River basin. Among the major components of the waterway is White Lake (Beloe ozero) in the Vologda territory. The town of Belozersk is located on the south shore of White Lake and became the main point on the White Lake Canal. Seen here are two icons from the town’s wooden tower church dedicated to the Prophet Elijah and erected in the 1690s. The icons, painted in an 18th-century academic style, depict two scenes ...
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Gospel and the Tabernacle in the Church of the Nativity of Christ. Krokhino, Russian Empire
At the beginning of the 20th century, the Russian photographer Sergei Mikhailovich Prokudin-Gorskii (1863–1944) used a special color photography process to create a visual record of the Russian Empire. Some of Prokudin-Gorskii’s photographs date from about 1905, but the bulk of his work is from between 1909 and 1915, when, with the support of Tsar Nicholas II and the Ministry of Transportation, he undertook extended trips through many different parts of the empire.
Contributed by Library of Congress
Wall Paintings in the Cathedral. Goritskii Monastery, Russian Empire
At the beginning of the 20th century, the Russian photographer Sergei Mikhailovich Prokudin-Gorskii (1863–1944) used a special color photography process to create a visual record of the Russian Empire. Some of Prokudin-Gorskii’s photographs date from about 1905, but the bulk of his work is from between 1909 and 1915, when, with the support of Tsar Nicholas II and the Ministry of Transportation, he undertook extended trips through many different parts of the empire.
Contributed by Library of Congress
Icon of the Mother of God. Goritskii Monastery, Russian Empire
At the beginning of the 20th century, the Russian photographer Sergei Mikhailovich Prokudin-Gorskii (1863–1944) used a special color photography process to create a visual record of the Russian Empire. Some of Prokudin-Gorskii’s photographs date from about 1905, but the bulk of his work is from between 1909 and 1915, when, with the support of Tsar Nicholas II and the Ministry of Transportation, he undertook extended trips through many different parts of the empire.
Contributed by Library of Congress
Icon of Our Savior. Goritskii Monastery, Russian Empire
At the beginning of the 20th century, the Russian photographer Sergei Mikhailovich Prokudin-Gorskii (1863–1944) used a special color photography process to create a visual record of the Russian Empire. Some of Prokudin-Gorskii’s photographs date from about 1905, but the bulk of his work is from between 1909 and 1915, when, with the support of Tsar Nicholas II and the Ministry of Transportation, he undertook extended trips through many different parts of the empire.
Contributed by Library of Congress
Interior Showing Exposed Brick and Column with Murals
At the beginning of the 20th century, the Russian photographer Sergei Mikhailovich Prokudin-Gorskii (1863–1944) used a special color photography process to create a visual record of the Russian Empire. Some of Prokudin-Gorskii’s photographs date from about 1905, but the bulk of his work is from between 1909 and 1915, when, with the support of Tsar Nicholas II and the Ministry of Transportation, he undertook extended trips through many different parts of the empire.
Contributed by Library of Congress
Frescoes in the Window Niches and a Copy of the Icon of Saint Nicholas the Wonder Worker in the Church. Nyrob
At the beginning of the 20th century, the Russian photographer Sergei Mikhailovich Prokudin-Gorskii (1863–1944) used a special color photography process to create a visual record of the Russian Empire. Some of Prokudin-Gorskii’s photographs date from about 1905, but the bulk of his work is from between 1909 and 1915, when, with the support of Tsar Nicholas II and the Ministry of Transportation, he undertook extended trips through many different parts of the empire.
Contributed by Library of Congress
Miraculous Icon of Saint Nicholas the Wonder Worker. Church of Saint Nicholas the Wonder Worker, Nyrob
The historic settlement of Nyrob in the northern Urals is located 40 kilometers north of the regional center of Cherdyn. Mentioned in written sources as early as 1579, Nyrob became known as a place of exile. It was there, in 1601, that Tsar Boris Godunov exiled Mikhail Nikitich Romanov, uncle of Mikhail Fedorovich Romanov, who in 1613 became the first tsar of the Romanov dynasty. The death of the elder Romanov in 1602, caused by harsh treatment while in captivity, endowed the site with special significance for the Romanovs, who ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Icon of Saint Nicholas the Wonder Worker Painted at the Same Time as the Miraculous Icon. Nyrob
At the beginning of the 20th century, the Russian photographer Sergei Mikhailovich Prokudin-Gorskii (1863–1944) used a special color photography process to create a visual record of the Russian Empire. Some of Prokudin-Gorskii’s photographs date from about 1905, but the bulk of his work is from between 1909 and 1915, when, with the support of Tsar Nicholas II and the Ministry of Transportation, he undertook extended trips through many different parts of the empire.
Contributed by Library of Congress
Entrance into the Church of Simon Kanonit. Novyi Afon Monastery
At the beginning of the 20th century, the Russian photographer Sergei Mikhailovich Prokudin-Gorskii (1863–1944) used a special color photography process to create a visual record of the Russian Empire. Some of Prokudin-Gorskii’s photographs date from about 1905, but the bulk of his work is from between 1909 and 1915, when, with the support of Tsar Nicholas II and the Ministry of Transportation, he undertook extended trips through many different parts of the empire.
Contributed by Library of Congress
Icon of the Mother of God of Smolensk, Belonging to Bagration. Borodino
At the beginning of the 20th century, the Russian photographer Sergei Mikhailovich Prokudin-Gorskii (1863–1944) used a special color photography process to create a visual record of the Russian Empire. Some of Prokudin-Gorskii’s photographs date from about 1905, but the bulk of his work is from between 1909 and 1915, when, with the support of Tsar Nicholas II and the Ministry of Transportation, he undertook extended trips through many different parts of the empire.
Contributed by Library of Congress
Miraculous Icon of Mother of God-Odigitriia in the Assumption Cathedral. Smolensk
This 1912 photograph of the iconostasis in the main Cathedral of the Dormition in Smolensk shows one of Russia’s most revered icons, the Smolensk Hodegetria Icon of the Mother of God, popularly thought to have been brought from Byzantium to the Kiev lands in the 11th century and transferred to Smolensk in 1097. Russian icons traditionally are painted on wood, but they were often covered with elaborate silver overlays that left visible only the heads and hands of the holy figures. This practice is displayed here, with the Hodegetria ...
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