14 results
Saldobosh'. Hut
This image is part of an album probably published in about 1920 that contains 20 photographs of scenes in Carpathian Ruthenia, a mountainous region, most of which was part of the Austria-Hungary before World War I, but which became part of the new Czechoslovak state in 1919. Today the largest portion of it forms Zakarpattia Oblast in western Ukraine, with smaller parts in Slovakia and Poland. This image is from the village of Saldobosh (present-day Steblivka) in the Khust region of south-central Zakarpattia Oblast. The roof of the thatched hut ...
Contributed by
National Parliamentary Library of Ukraine
Jewish Customs. Holiday Gathering
This photograph is from the ethnographical part of Turkestan Album, a comprehensive visual survey of Central Asia undertaken after imperial Russia assumed control of the region in the 1860s. Commissioned by General Konstantin Petrovich von Kaufman (1818–82), the first governor-general of Russian Turkestan, the album is in four parts spanning six volumes: “Archaeological Part” (two volumes); “Ethnographic Part” (two volumes); “Trades Part” (one volume); and “Historical Part” (one volume). The principal compiler was Russian Orientalist Aleksandr L. Kun, who was assisted by Nikolai V. Bogaevskii. The album contains some ...
Contributed by
Library of Congress
Jewish Customs. External View of a Holiday Tent
This photograph is from the ethnographical part of Turkestan Album, a comprehensive visual survey of Central Asia undertaken after imperial Russia assumed control of the region in the 1860s. Commissioned by General Konstantin Petrovich von Kaufman (1818–82), the first governor-general of Russian Turkestan, the album is in four parts spanning six volumes: “Archaeological Part” (two volumes); “Ethnographic Part” (two volumes); “Trades Part” (one volume); and “Historical Part” (one volume). The principal compiler was Russian Orientalist Aleksandr L. Kun, who was assisted by Nikolai V. Bogaevskii. The album contains some ...
Contributed by
Library of Congress
Zulu Chief, South Africa
This 1895 photo of a Zulu chief in native dress standing in front of a thatched hut is from the Frank and Frances Carpenter Collection at the Library of Congress. Frank G. Carpenter (1855-1924) was an American writer of books on travel and world geography whose works helped to popularize cultural anthropology and geography in the United States in the early years of the 20th century. The Zulu are southern Africa’s largest ethnic group. Zululand, where this photograph was taken, was absorbed into the British colony of Natal following ...
Contributed by
Library of Congress
Barbados, Native Huts
This photograph is from the Frank and Frances Carpenter Collection at the Library of Congress. Frank G. Carpenter (1855–1924) was an American writer of books on travel and world geography, whose works helped to popularize cultural anthropology and geography in the United States in the early years of the 20th century. Consisting of photographs taken and gathered by Carpenter and his daughter Frances (1890–1972) to illustrate his writings, the collection includes an estimated 16,800 photographs and 7,000 glass and film negatives. The easternmost island in the ...
Contributed by
Library of Congress
Rural Scene
This photograph from Suriname shows traditional thatched huts in a small village. The photograph is from the collection of the Columbus Memorial Library of the Organization of American States (OAS), which includes 45,000 photographs illustrative of life and culture in the Americas. Many of the photographs were taken by prominent photographers on OAS missions to member countries. The OAS was established in April 1948 when 21 countries of the western hemisphere adopted the OAS Charter, in which they reaffirmed their commitment to the pursuit of common goals and respect ...
Contributed by
Columbus Memorial Library, Organization of American States
Blacks on Tobacco Plantation, Jamaica
This photograph depicting a scene in Jamaica is from the Frank and Frances Carpenter Collection at the Library of Congress. Frank G. Carpenter (1855–1924) was an American writer of books on travel and world geography. whose works helped to popularize cultural anthropology and geography in the United States in the early years of the 20th century. Consisting of photographs taken and gathered by Carpenter and his daughter Frances (1890–1972) to illustrate his writings, the collection includes an estimated 16,800 photographs and 7,000 glass and film negatives ...
Contributed by
Library of Congress
Native Woman and Five Children in front of Huts near Bulawayo, Rhodesia, Africa
This photograph of a woman and children near Bulaway, Rhodesia (present-day Zimbabwe), is from the Frank and Frances Carpenter Collection at the Library of Congress. Frank G. Carpenter (1855–1924) was an American writer of books on travel and world geography, whose works helped to popularize cultural anthropology and geography in the United States in the early years of the 20th century. Consisting of photographs taken and gathered by Carpenter and his daughter Frances (1890–1972) to illustrate his writings, the collection includes an estimated 16,800 photographs and 7 ...
Contributed by
Library of Congress
Hut of Settler Artemii, Nicknamed Kota, Who Has Lived at This Place More than 40 Years
At the beginning of the 20th century, the Russian photographer Sergei Mikhailovich Prokudin-Gorskii (1863–1944) used a special color photography process to create a visual record of the Russian Empire. Some of Prokudin-Gorskii’s photographs date from about 1905, but the bulk of his work is from between 1909 and 1915, when, with the support of Tsar Nicholas II and the Ministry of Transportation, he undertook extended trips through many different parts of the empire.
Contributed by
Library of Congress
Interior of an Indian Hut, Province of Chocó
This watercolor by Manuel María Paz (1820−1902) shows an Amerindian family at home in the Province of Chocó (present-day Department of Chocó), in the Pacific lowlands of western Colombia. The scene shows a mother nursing her baby while the father looks on; another adult is seated on the right. In the background are palm trees, mountains, and a sky with billowing clouds. Chocó is one of the wettest places in the world, with an annual average rainfall of more than 10 meters. The watercolor is typical of Paz’s ...
Contributed by
National Library of Colombia
Liquor Shop in the Village of Lloró, Province of Chocó
This watercolor by Manuel María Paz (1820−1902) shows two men buying and consuming liquor at a shop in the village of Lloró. The drink most likely was locally made from cane sugar. Located in the Province of Chocó (present-day Department of Chocó) in western Colombia, the municipality of Lloró has the distinction of being the wettest place in the world, with an average annual rainfall of 13,300 millimeters. The watercolor is typical of Paz’s work, which captured the diversity of the population of New Granada and depicted ...
Contributed by
National Library of Colombia
View from a Street in Nóvita, Chocó Province
In this watercolor, Manuel María Paz (1820−1902) shows the small village of Nóvita in Chocó Province (present-day Department of Chocó), western Colombia. This region was home to many such villages inhabited by people of African origin. It became economically important in the early 18th century when gold was found in the area. The watercolor is typical of Paz’s work, which captured the diversity of the population of New Granada and depicted the daily activities and traditional customs of the country’s different ethnic, racial, and social groups. Paz ...
Contributed by
National Library of Colombia
The Village of Tebada, Chocó Province
This watercolor by Manuel María Paz (1820−1902) shows a scene from a small village on the banks of the Tebada River in Chocó Province (present-day Department of Chocó) in western Colombia. Fishermen are seen on the river, while a man watches from the shore. A woman carries water up from the river. Chocó was mainly inhabited by Afro-Colombians and Amerindians who supported themselves by farming, fishing, and some mining. The watercolor is typical of Paz’s work, which captured the diversity of the population of New Granada and depicted ...
Contributed by
National Library of Colombia
The Village of Sipí or San Agustín, Chocó Province
This watercolor by Manuel María Paz (1820−1902) shows the village of Sipí or San Agustín in Chocó Province (present-day Department of Chocó), western Colombia. The houses are on raised platforms, and parts of tree trunks with notches are used as steps. At the house in the foreground a man leans out from the steps, while a woman passes by in the street. The watercolor is typical of Paz’s work, which captured the diversity of the population of New Granada and depicted the daily activities and traditional customs of ...
Contributed by
National Library of Colombia