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15 results
Zeravshan District. City of Samarkand. City Hospital for the Native Population
This photograph is from the ethnographical part of Turkestan Album, a comprehensive visual survey of Central Asia undertaken after imperial Russia assumed control of the region in the 1860s. Commissioned by General Konstantin Petrovich von Kaufman (1818–82), the first governor-general of Russian Turkestan, the album is in four parts spanning six volumes: “Archaeological Part” (two volumes); “Ethnographic Part” (two volumes); “Trades Part” (one volume); and “Historical Part” (one volume). The principal compiler was Russian Orientalist Aleksandr L. Kun, who was assisted by Nikolai V. Bogaevskii. The album contains some ...
Contributed by
Library of Congress
Frontier Folk of the Afghan Border—and Beyond
Frontier Folk of the Afghan Border—and Beyond is a book of photographs, with explanatory text, of people from more than 20 tribes and ethnic groups mainly living in the Northwest Frontier region of British India (present-day Pakistan) or across the border in Afghanistan. A few of the pictures show people or scenes from Kashmir, Tibet, and Russian Turkestan. The photographs depict local costumes, festivals and celebrations, and economic life. Most were taken by Captain L.B. Cane of the Royal Army Medical Corps. The text is by Lilian Agnes ...
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Library of Congress
Sadiky Hospital, Tunis, Tunisia
This photochrome print from around 1899 is from “Views of Architecture and People in Tunisia” in the catalog of the Detroit Photographic Company. It depicts the Sadiky Hospital in the city of Tunis. The Detroit Photographic Company was launched as a photographic publishing firm in the late 1890s by Detroit businessman and publisher William A. Livingstone, Jr. and photographer and photo-publisher Edwin H. Husher. They obtained the exclusive rights to use the Swiss "Photochrom" process for converting black-and-white photographs into color images and printing them by photolithography. This process permitted ...
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Library of Congress
The Y.M.C.A. Service for Relatives of Dangerously Wounded
This 1915 British poster shows a woman visiting a wounded soldier in a hospital, as a doctor and a Red Cross nurse look on. During World War I, the YMCA provided many services to troops at the front, to those on home leave, and to their families. The illustration is by British artist Edgar Wright, who created a series of posters depicting the YMCA’s wartime work. Wright was also one of the main illustrators of the book, The Romance of the Red Triangle: The Story of the Coming of ...
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Library of Congress
Friends Asylum for the Insane near Frankford
This lithograph depicts the first private psychiatric hospital in the United States as it appeared in the early 1830s. Known as the Friends’ Asylum for the Insane, it was founded in 1813 by the Society of Friends (also called the Quakers) and opened to patients in 1817. The institution stood on land that formerly was a 52-acre farm in Oxford Township, near Frankford, six miles (10 kilometers) northeast of the center of Philadelphia. Shown here is an exterior view of the almshouse building as it appeared after two patient wings ...
Contributed by
The Library Company of Philadelphia
View of the Philadelphia Alms House: Blockley
This 1835 lithograph by George Lehman shows the Blockley Alms House in Philadelphia, as seen from Hyde Park on the east bank of the Schuylkill River. The view shows the riverbanks where two men fish and cows graze. A two-masted sailing ship passes by, with other ships on the river and the sprawling city stretched out in the background. William Strickland (1788–1854), a founder of Greek Revival architecture in the United States, designed the quadrangle of four large buildings that formed the almshouse. The original Philadelphia Alms House was ...
Contributed by
The Library Company of Philadelphia
Friends' Asylum for the Insane near Frankford
This circa 1836 lithograph depicts the first private psychiatric hospital in the United States. Known as the Friends’ Asylum for the Insane, it was founded in 1813 by the Society of Friends (also called the Quakers) and opened to patients in 1817. The institution stood on land that formerly was a 52-acre farm in Oxford Township, near Frankford, ten kilometers northeast of the center of Philadelphia. The view here, a pastoral scene with men standing in the foreground and animals grazing, is of the almshouse building as it appeared after ...
Contributed by
The Library Company of Philadelphia
Alms House. Philadelphia
This 1840s print shows the Blockley Alms House in Philadelphia, as seen from the east bank of the Schuylkill River. It includes the Market Street Bridge, Beck’s shot tower (a city landmark since 1808) and, in the far distance, the Eastern State Penitentiary. William Strickland (1788–1854), a founder of Greek Revival architecture in the United States, designed the quadrangle of four large buildings that formed the almshouse. The original Philadelphia Alms House was constructed in the early 1730s and was the first multifunctional government-sponsored institution for the care ...
Contributed by
The Library Company of Philadelphia
Pennsylvania Hospital
This print shows an exterior view from the southeast of the Pennsylvania Hospital, located on Pine Street between 8th and 9th Streets in Philadelphia. The street scene in the foreground includes a carriage, a wagon, riders on horseback including a woman riding sidesaddle, pedestrians, and a watchman's guardhouse. Benjamin Franklin helped raise funds for the first Pennsylvania Hospital building, the east wing, which was designed by Samuel Rhoads and constructed in 1755 on a site that was then far from the smells and noise of the city center. Rhoads ...
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The Library Company of Philadelphia
Citizens Volunteer Hospital. Corner of Broad Street and Washington Avenue
This Civil War fundraising certificate contains views of the exterior and interior of the volunteer hospital opposite the Philadelphia, Wilmington, & Baltimore Railroad depot in Philadelphia. The hospital opened on September 5, 1862, and closed on August 11, 1865. During the American Civil War, the hospital provided care to the most seriously wounded before their reassignment to other hospitals. The exterior view shows civilians and a troop of Union soldiers standing in front of the hospital as a train arrives. The interior view shows rows of beds lining a central hallway. Women volunteers attend to bed-ridden soldiers and set a long table for a meal. The illustrations are framed by decorative motifs that include the seal of the city of Philadelphia; angels hovering above an able-bodied and an injured soldier in front of columns inscribed "The Glory of the Volunteer"; American flags; and floral elements. The work is by James Fuller Queen, a Philadelphia lithographer and pioneer chromolithographer. Queen served in the militia in 1862–63 and created several lithographs with Civil War subjects, including contribution certificates for the city's relief institutions.
Contributed by
The Library Company of Philadelphia
Panorama of Philadelphia from the State House Steeple. South
This print is a panoramic view of Philadelphia as seen looking south toward the Delaware River from the State House (Independence Hall) steeple. The area of the city shown is mainly between Independence Square, the river, and about 8th Street. The numbered key indicates seven landmarks visible in the print: (1) the Navy Yard at Southwark; (2) Shot Tower; (3) Philadelphia Prison, i.e., Moyamensing Prison; (4) Albert Barnes Church, i.e., First Presbyterian Church; (5) Pennsylvania Hospital; (6) Washington Square, between Sixth, Eighth, Walnut, and Spruce Streets; and (7 ...
Contributed by
The Library Company of Philadelphia
Union Volunteer Refreshment Saloon, of Philadelphia
This print is a lively scene from November 1863 containing a view of the two hospitals, refreshment stand, and other buildings of the Union Volunteer Refreshment Saloon located near the Navy Yard at Swanson and Washington Avenues in Philadelphia during the American Civil War. Situated at the transportation hub between the North and the South on land leased for free from the Philadelphia, Wilmington & Baltimore Railroad, the saloon was a volunteer relief agency that provided meals, hospital care, washing, sleeping, and writing facilities to military personnel, refugees, and freedmen. It ...
Contributed by
The Library Company of Philadelphia
In Commemoration of the Great Parade of the Philadelphia Fire Department, October 16th, 1865
This tinted print commemorates the great parade of the Philadelphia Fire Department on October 16, 1865, and is dedicated to the Philadelphia firemen and their “visiting brethren.” The text at the bottom lists the fire companies participating in the parade, mainly from Pennsylvania, New Jersey, and New York, but some from as far away as Massachusetts and the District of Columbia. The print is based on an illustration by Francis H. Schell (1834–1909), an artist, illustrator, and lithographer in Philadelphia, who later worked in New York for Frank Leslie ...
Contributed by
The Library Company of Philadelphia
Citizens Volunteer Hospital Association of Philadelphia. Instituted September 5th, 1862
This contribution certificate for the Citizens Volunteer Hospital Association shows a view of a street scene near the hospital, which was situated opposite the Philadelphia, Wilmington, & Baltimore Railroad depot at the corner of Broad Street and Washington Avenue in Philadelphia. On the sidewalk, American Civil War soldiers are seen conversing, pedestrians stroll, and a female peddler and vendor sell their goods and wares, including to a group of Zouaves. In the street, medical personnel and doctors accompany injured soldiers, by stretcher, foot, and on crutches toward the hospital. Horse-drawn carriages ...
Contributed by
The Library Company of Philadelphia
Mower U.S.A. General Hospital, Chestnut Hill, Philadelphia
This print is a bird's eye view of the Mower General Hospital, operated by the U.S. Army during the American Civil War. Built in 1862 after the designs of Philadelphia architect John McArthur, Jr., the hospital was located opposite the Chestnut Hill track of the Philadelphia and Reading Railroad. The hospital received injured soldiers transported directly from the battlefield between January 1863 and May 1865. Designed as a pavilion to control the spread of infection, it consisted of hospital wards radiating from a central enclosed complex of administrative ...
Contributed by
The Library Company of Philadelphia