13 results
Maps of Shazhou in Jiangyin County
The land on which Shazhou, Jiangyin County, Jiangsu Province (present-day Zhangjiagang) is located was formed by alluvial deposits of the Yangtze River over a period of thousands of years. As the land grew and changed, local people made paintings of the area, which they petitioned the authorities to acquire. Measurements of the narrow strip of land formed by the river deposits differed, and those seeking to obtain land often conspired with officials, resulting in lawsuits and disorder. Two officials, Wu Heng and Xie Cunbin, together with the magistrate of Jiangyin ...
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National Central Library
The Newly Compiled Overall Geographical Survey
The original work on which this compilation is based was completed in 1239, as indicated in its two prefaces, one by Lü Wu (1179–1255), and another at the end by the author Zhu Mu (died 1255). It was reprinted in 1267 by Zhu Mu’s son Zhu Zhu (jin shi 1256). The original work had two parts, part one in 43 juan and part two in seven juan, along with a 20-juan supplement and a one-juan appendix. This reprinted edition has 70 juan. According to Zhu Zhu’s postscript ...
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National Central Library
General Atlas of Xinjiang
This work is a hand-painted atlas of Xinjiang. The atlas is small, with frames of different sizes. There are no prefaces or postscripts, and the identity of the map maker is unknown. The atlas is executed in the traditional landscape-painting style and does not provide degrees of longitude and latitude, nor scales. Towns, rivers, lakes, and mountains are all depicted in their approximate locations. Each map covers one double-page spread. The four directions from the east to the north are marked, but the boundary lines of cities and towns are ...
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National Central Library
Illustrated Atlas of Shanhai, Yongping, Jizhou, Miyun, Gubeikou, Huanghua Zhen and Other Areas
This work is an illustrated military map dating from the Ming dynasty (1368–1644) of the northeastern part of Jingshi (present-day Beijing), along the Great Wall. It is formatted in accordion pleat-like leaves, and is large, measuring 58.8 centimeters high by 21 centimeters wide. The edges of the atlas are broken and frayed. The original collector tied the atlas on a hard board and placed it in a case, taking great care. The map depicts Shanhaiguan (Shanhai Pass) from Bohai Sea in the east, winding westward through Funing Xian ...
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General Atlas Depicting the Conditions of the Yellow River Dykes in Henan Province
This Qing-dynasty atlas painted in color is formatted in accordion pleat-like leaves, in 21 folded sheets. The directions used in the maps are the exact opposite of those commonly used, that is, the south is on the top, the north at the bottom, the west is on the right side, and the east on the left. The maps illustrate the distribution of dykes along the Yellow River within the territory of Henan Province. The atlas starts from the west with Huayin Xian, which borders Shaanxi and Shanxi provinces, and continues ...
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National Central Library
The Complete World Map
The author of this work is unknown. The name of the person who copied the manuscript appears at the end of the work, signed Zhou Yousheng. Some have attributed authorship to Ai Nanying (1583–1646), a late-Ming essayist and literary critic, who wrote a work entitled Yu Gong tu zhu (Explanatory text to the map of the Yu Gong), the central concept of which was the traditional Chinese view on geography. According to that view, Yu of the Xia dynasty (circa 2070–circa 1600 BC) divided the Middle Kingdom into ...
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Abridged Copy of the Geographical Map in the Inner Court of the Qing Dynasty
This work is by Liu Yan, also called Dezhi, a middle- and late-Qing dynasty scholar in history, geography, and astronomy. Liu Yan produced and contributed to a number of works in the field of geography, including Ji yuan bian (Dictionary of reign names), Li dai di li yan ge tu (A historical geographical atlas of dynasties), and Li dai di li zhi yun bian jin shi (Dictionary of geographical names with new explanations). Although most of his works appeared under the name of his teacher, the renowned geographer Li Zhaoluo ...
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National Central Library
The Administrative Maps of the Ming Dynasty (Incomplete Copy)
The author of this work was Chen Zushou (died 1637), a late-Ming literary author. A native of Yanling (present-day Changzhou, Jiangsu Province), Chen Zushou received his jin shi degree in 1634 and became, in the following year, an official at the Bureau of Operations, one of the four bureaus in the Ministry of War. In 1636, while working at the ministry, he wrote this book, based on a large number of earlier works and contemporary local records, including maps. The original edition, very rich in content, had three juan in ...
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Chronicle of Foreign Lands
The Zhifang waiji (Chronicle of foreign lands) is a concise geography of the world, the first of its kind written in Chinese. The Italian Jesuit missionary Matteo Ricci produced a map of the world in Chinese in 1584. The map, which followed Western principles of cartography then unknown in China, underwent several revisions between 1584 and 1602. Ricci’s fellow priests Diego de Pantoja and Sabatino de Ursis were instructed by imperial order to compose a book explaining the map. Pantoja died in 1618 and the work eventually was completed ...
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Library of Congress
Universal Geography for Children
Geography textbooks were very popular as basic education tools during the 19th-century National Revival in Bulgaria. Between 1824 and 1878, some 43 different titles or editions of this genre were published. Universal Geography for Children by Ivan Bogorov, or Bogoev (1818–92), appeared early in this tradition. Bogorov’s book was a translation from the Russian of a work, also entitled Universal Geography, by Vasilii Bardovskii (1804–74), a teacher of geography at a gymnasium in St. Petersburg and the author of several popular Russian geography textbooks. Bogorov’s Mathematical ...
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Central Library of the Bulgarian Academy of Sciences
Complete Map of the Seven Coastal Provinces
The postscript to this work indicates that it was based on an original painting by Zhou Beitang, which was later acquired by a man named Shao Tinglie who had it published, together with two other works, Wusong ko fang yang (Wusong port to the ocean) and Jiang dong xing sheng (Natural frontiers east of the river) in book form in woodblock print. The book depicts the coastal provinces of Fengtian, Zhili, Shandong, Jiangsu, Zhejiang, Fujian and Guangdong; and areas near the port of Wusong, including Baoshan, Shanghai, Huangpu River and ...
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Library of Congress
Annotations to Maps
The original inscription of this work reads: “Compiled by Li Rihua of Jiahe; supplemented by Lu Zhongmin of Qianjiang; and edited by Qian Weiqi of Gulin.” Si ku quan shu zong mu (General catalog of the imperial Siku collection) records three of Li Rihua’s works, but not this title, which leads to the conclusion that Li may not have been its author. However, the prefaces of several other reference works claim that Li Rihua was the author of this work and that it was edited and supplemented by Lu ...
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Library of Congress
Maps of Ancient and Present Times
The three-volume work composed of maps with detailed texts was compiled by Wu Guofu of the Ming dynasty, based on a work done by Shen Dingzhi. The maps are executed in chromatography in red and black. There are two prefaces: one by Wu Guofu, dated 1638, and another by Chen Zilong, dated 1643.
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Library of Congress